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SIR OFFLEY WAKEMAN, BART, 
Provincial Grand Master of Shropshire. 



HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 



IN THE 



Province of Shropshire, 



THE SALOPIAN LODGE, 262, 
With an Introduction by Beg. W. J. Hughan, 



PAST GRAND DEACON OF ENGLAND, 



BY 



ALEXANDER GRAHAM, J.D., 262. 

(Published by permission of the R.W.P.G.M.) 



Sbrewsburg : 

ADNITT & NAUNTON, BOOKSELLERS & PUBLISHEES, THE SQUARE. 



1892. 



UU. 



5"? 7 



.73 



Preface. 



My original intention was to write only the history of 
my Mother Lodge, the "Salopian," No. 262. From time to 
time, however, during the course of my investigations, much in- 
formation about the Craft in the Province came to hand, and I 
have thought it best, while, in the main, preserving my original 
intention, to incorporate this information in its present shape. 

I cannot hope to have avoided making many mistakes, 
and much that ought to be included may be found wanting ; for 
such blemishes I can only ask the indulgence of my readers on 
the ground of my inexperience, and from the fact that I was 
traversing an almost unknown country, with few landmarks to 
guide me on my way. 

I gladly take this opportunity of tendering to the many 
brethren, too numerous to mention separately by name, who have 
assisted me in my task, my most sincere thanks for their kindness 
and courtesy ; without their valuable help even the measure of 
success I have achieved would have been impossible. Out of my 
large band of helpers I must content myself with naming and 
specifically thanking three. To Bro. W. J. Hughan, I, in com- 
mon with all Masonic Students, owe a debt of gratitude which it 
is impossible to repay. His great knowledge, always at the ser- 
vice of the veriest tyro in Masonic work, has, I hope, enabled me 
to steer clear of gross errors, whilst his kind advice has in many 
respects lightened my labours. The introduction he has so kindly 
written for me adds greatly to the value of my book, and will, I 
am sure, be much appreciated. He desires me to add to the in- 
formation therein contained the result of his inquiries with 



respect to the " Opperative Lodge," No. 184, mentioned on 
page 149 of my book. The Lodge m question was the " Opera- 
tive Lodge,'' Dumfries, Warranted on 5th Feb., 1776, and now 
No. 140. 

To Bro. H. Sadler, Grand Tyler of England, I am in- 
debted for much reliable and valuable information ; his services, 
notwithstanding the many calls upon his time, were always placed 
most ungrudgingly at my disposal for purposes of reference to 
the authorities in the Grand Lodge Library. 

To Bro. Wyndham Deedes, I.P.M., 262, I also tender my 
grateful acknowledgment of the sympathy and help he so kindly 
and constantly gave ; without it I might have abandoned a task 
which seemed beyond my powers. 

A. GRAHAM. 
DoGPOLE Chambers, 

Sheewsbuey, 

April 17th, 1892. 




Introduction. 



The precise origin of Provincial Grand Lodges has not 
yet been elucidated ; for the evidence of the Rev. James 
Anderson, important as it is, is neither exact nor complete, if 
the " Returns " of Chester Lodges are to be trusted, of the 
year 1725. 

It has been the custom to accept Dr. Anderson's account 
in the "Book of Constitutions, A.D. 1738, without question, 
wherein we read that "on 10 May, 1727, Inchiquin Grand 
Master granted a Deputation to Hugh War burton, Esq., to be 
Provincial Grand Master of North Wales at Chester," and that 
"on 24 June, 1727, to Sir Edward Mansel, Bart, to be Provincial 
Grand Master of South Wales at Caermarthen." 

These are the earliest appointments of the kind noted in 
that volume ; immediately followed by " Lovel, Grand Master 
granted a Deputation to Sir Edward Matthews to be Provincial 
Grand Master of Shropshire." 

Singular to state, however, on looking through the Minute 
Book of the Grand Lodge of England, which begins in 1723, I 
found to my surprise, that the name of " Col. Era Columbine, 
Provincial Grand Master" was not only returned in that form 
by the Old Lodge, meeting at the "Sun," Chester, in 1725, but 
is entered accordingly in the Records of Grand Lodge, as also 
the names of his Deputy and two Wardens, the J.G.W. being 
" Cap. Hugh Warburton," whose appointment as Prov. G. M in 
1727 has already been noted. 



A letter also was read to tlie Grand Lodge later on, dated 
15th April, 1727, signed by the then Prov. G. M., (Captain 
Warburton) ; his Deputy being the same as his predecessor had 
in 1725, but two new Prov. G. Wardens being mentioned. This 
brother signed as Prov. G. M., though prior to the date of the 
first appointment cited by Anderson, which is certainly remark- 
able, there being thus two Prov. G. Masters before the period 
noted in the " Book of Constitutions," published by authority.* 
Subsequent issues of the Laws of the Grand Lodge, such as 1756, 
and 1767 are less reliable on these points than the 2nd edition 
of 1738. 

In the Ofiicial Calendar there are no Prov. G. Masters 
recorded for Durham between 1734 and 1787, but the Minute 
Books of the " Industry " Lodge, No. 48, Gateshead, (so Bro. 
W. Logan, P.P.G.R.O. informs me) contain the names of nine 
brethren from 1747 to 1763, who held that office for Durham, 
all P.M's of that Lodge ; and under 1781 it is stated that in 
accordance with the Charter of 1734 "authorizing us to appoint 
a Provincial Grand Master, we have elected our Worshipful 
Master, David Richardson to that most Honble. Office during 
his life." The change in 1788 was brought about by the spirited 
action of the " Marquis of Granby " Lodge, supported by the 
other Lodges in the Province. 

Nothing has transpired to invalidate the claim of Shrop- 
shire to be considered the premier Province of England, though, 
as Bro. Graham states, we are left in the dark as to what use 
was made of the privilege ; and during a portion of the time, at 
least, there was not even a single Lodge to give the Prov. G.M. 
any work to do. A Prov. G.M. without any Lodges was an 
experience even of later times as considerable latitude prevailed 
as to such matters down to the end of last century. 

Soon after the formation of the Grand Lodge of England 
(the first organization of its kind in the world), the Grand Master 

*Vide ''Freemason," June 12, 1886, Article on "Early Chester Masonry." by Bro. H. 
Sadler, and another by W. J, Hughan, entitled " A Curious I'raud." 



Vll 

began to regularize Lodges by " Constituting " them, but not by 
Warrants, as subsequently. The first of these, apparently, and 
still on the Roll, was the present No. 6, the " Lodge of Friend- 
ship," London, duly constituted on 17th Jan., 1721. A few- 
years later. Lodges were started in the Provinces, and by 1736, 
when a Lodge was opened at Shrewsbury on 16th April — the 
first in Shropshire, — in many Counties of England numbers of 
Lodges were at work, and the Craft was rapidly extending abroad. 

For some reason or other. Freemasonry did not flourish in 
Salop, as in most other Provinces ; and hence this Lodge of 1736, 
had but a fitful existence, finally expiring in 1768. In the first 
edition of the Official Engraved List for 1736, No. 142, Shrews- 
bury (without day of meeting, or date of Constitution) numbered 
142, and the last on the Roll, is duly inserted. This unique little 
gem is owned by my old friend, Bro. E. T. Carson, of Cincinnati, 
U.S.A., who has had it reproduced, by my desire, and thus kindly 
gratifying many of his attached brethren. 

The advent of the Salopian Lodge, No. 262, and the re- 
vival of the Provincial Grand Lodge, occurred in the same decade 
of last century ; the Shropshire Craft having secured a permanent 
footing about the year 1788. 

The particulars of Masonic activity during the first portion 
of this period, especially in connection with the zealous Brother, 
Major Charles Shirreff, have been most interestingly narrated by 
Bro. Graham, who has done justice to the subject, and left noth- 
ing more to be said. 

It will be well to remember, however, that whilst there 
are different views as to the orgin of the " Great Schism," there 
is no question as to the year when the rival Grand Lodge in 
London started. 

The "Ancients" formed their organization in 1751, and 
on uniting with the "Moderns," in 1813, all rivalry and sepa- 
rate establishments were happily ended. 



Prior to this date, when the blessed Union was consum- 
mated, the Royal Arch Degree was recognized and worked by 
the " Ancient " Lodges without distinct Warrants, but the 
" Moderns " had an independent Grand Chapter to control that 
ceremony, there being separate Chapters with special Charters 
and quite a different set of numbers. The first Chapters formed 
under such auspices, not officially, but practically, recognised by 
the regular Brethren, was in 1769, and, at the time of the Union, 
there were some 150 of these subordinates under the wing of the 
Supreme Grand Chapter, located mostly in the country, but many 
were in a very comatose state. 

Preliminaries for the union of the two Grand Chapters — 
" Moderns '' and " Ancients " — were arranged on Nov. 30th, 
1813, and on March 18th, 1817, the " United Grand Chapter of 
Royal Arch Masons of England,'' was formally constituted. 

The only Chapter in Shropshire, with a separate Warrant, 
prior to the Union, was No. 118, " Agenorian,'' Bridgnorth; 
doubtless promoted by the members of the " Lodge of Industry," 
No 578, and was formed in 1801. It was taken under the pro- 
tection of that Lodge, in due course, and became No. 597, 
retaining the same name as previously, but collapsed when the 
Lodge did. 

Notwithstanding the publication of the Royal Arch Regu- 
lations of 1823, and later editions, many companions continued 
to work the ceremony without any lawful authority, just as the 
members of the "Salopian" Lodge (No. 262,) as recorded by 
Bro. Graham ; some by virtue of the Warrants granted under the 
old regime, and others without even a shadow of justification. 

The Charter for No. 262 (then 328) was agreed to on 17th 
May, 1843, M.E. Comp. The Earl of Zetland, Pro. G.Z., being in 
the Chair. Soon after, the Chapter paid the fees for its Con- 
stitution (five guineas) and £11 12s. 6d. for eight certificates 
and twenty-two exaltations, so the Companions began well. No 
returns were made between 1844 and 1855, when the sum pf 



£1 7s. 6d. was paid, and, in 1858-9, twelve Companions were 
registered and £9 10s. Od. remitted, another payment being 
made in 1862-3 of £1 15s. Od. Since then its progress has been 
steady, if not brilliant. 

Bro. Graham has managed to obtain so many facts con- 
cerning Freemasonry in Shropshire, and, moreover, has arranged 
them so well, that he has left nothing for me to do ; so that my 
Introduction is of necessity both brief and bald. I most warmly 
congratulate him on his successful debut, as the historian of his 
Province, and especially of his Lodge, No. 262. Beyond question 
his work is both valuable and readable, its importance being such 
as to abundantly justify its publication, and the Records thus 
preserved are of special interest to a large circle of Masonic 
Students far beyond the confines of Shropshire. 

W. J. HUGHAN. 

dunscoee, 

Torquay, 
April 11th, 1892. 




LIST OF SUBSCRIBERS. 



Acton, Capt. E. F. W., 1621. 

Adams, W., P.M. 117, W.M. 2311, P.G.A.D. of C. 

Ashdown, Rev. G. M., 262, P.G.C. 

Austin, W., Sec. 2311. 

Avery, John, P.M. 262, P.P.G.W. (2 copies). 

Bain, G. W., P.M. 949, P.P.G.R. (Durham). 

Baxter, W. E., W.M. 117. 

Belton, W., P.M. 117, 2311, P.P.G.D. 

Bennion, S., P.M. 293, 1575, P.P.G.D. 

Benson, 0. K., P.M. 1124, 1336, P.G.W. (N. Wales). 

Berkeley, P. M., P.M. 262, P.G.D. (2 copies). 

Bethell, A., 1621. 

Blower, B., I.P.M. 117. 

Bodenham, J., P.M. 1896, P.P.G.W. 

Bratton, J.A., S.W. 262, P.G.O. 

Bromwich, T., I.P.M. 1621, P.G. Steward. 

Burd, E., P.M. 117, P.P.G.A.D. of C. 

Carson, J. L., 891 (I.C.) 

Carson, E. T., 34 (Ohio) 33° N.S.C. 

Chittey, E. J., P.M. & J.D. 1621, P.P.G.A.D. of C. 

Clarke, H. C, P.M. 262, P.P.G.R. 

Collins, T., P.M. 1896, P.P.G.W. 

Cooksey, J. H., P.M. &. Treas. 1621, P.P.G.R. (2 copies). 

Cooper, C. J., J.W. 1621. 

CowHng, C. H., S.W. 117. 

Craig, R. A., P.M. 262, P.P.G.R. (3 copies). 

Crump, V. C. L., P.M. 117, 2311, P.G. Treas. (2 copies). 



Davis, A. T., 262 

Deakin, A. B., P.M. 117, P.P.G.S.B. 

Deakin, T. P., P.M. 117, P.G.A. Sec. 

Deedes, W., I.P.M. 263, P.G. Steward (3 copies). 

Deighton, C. H., I.G. 1621. 

Eddowes, W., P.M. 262. 

Emson, Rev. P. E. A, Chaplain 262. 

Elliot, Rev. W., P.M. 262. 

Francis, T., P.P.G.D. Sussex, P.P.G.W. (Hants, k I. of W.) 

Freeman, Captain G. W., P.M. 1068, 262, Hon. S.G.W. 
(N.G.L. Egypt.) 

Genge, Rev. R. S. 

Giles, H. R., P.M. 2131, P.G.R. 

Glassow, C. J., 2131. 

Gore, J. R. Ormsby, J.W. 2131. 

Gray, J., 262 

Hamilton, J. 

Harding, W. E., P.M. & Treas. 262, P.P.G.W. (2 copies). 

Horton, T. R., J.D. 1120, 601. 

Hughan, W. J., P.S.G.D. (Eng.) P.P.G.W. & P.P.G. Sec. 
(Cornwall.) 

Hughes, H. W., Org. 117. 

Hurley, C, 117. 

Hutchison, Rev. E. A. 

Hyslop, W. C, 262. 

KUvert, J. M., P.M. 601, 262. 
King, Roff, P.M. 601, P.P.G.W. 

Lane, J., P.M. U02, P.P.G.R. (Devon) 
Leighton, Stanley, P.M. 1124, P.P.G.W. 
Lewis, R., P.M. 117, P.P.G.R. 
Lister, J. C. W., P.M. 1120, P.P.G.A.D. of C. 
Litt, W. E., P.M. 117. 



McLeod, J. M., P.G.W. (Derbyshire), Sec. R.M.I, for Boys. 

Mead, Colonel J. 

MiUington, R., P.M. 601, P.P.G.D. 

Morris, H., P.M. 1124. 

Morris, J. H., 117. 

Morris, W. B., P.M. 117. 

Newman, H. P., J.D. 117 (2 copies). 
Nicholson, A. C, 1432. 

Ogg, W. J., 2131, P.P.G.S. of W. 

Oswell, A. E. LI., P.M. 262, P.G.S. of W. (3 copies). 

Oxley, L. J. R., 117. 

Packer, H., J.W. 1120, 262. 
Parsons, J. H., P.M. 1432, P.P.G.D. 
Patchett, W., P.M. 117, 262 (2 copies). 
Peele, Cecil, P.M. 262 (2 copies). 
Peele, R. De C, Steward, 611. 
Peele, W. C. C, I.G. 262 (2 copies). 
Pigott, F. K., 262. 

Redman, J. H., P.M. 262, P.P.G.W. 
Roberts, T., P.M. 611, P.P.G.R. 
Royle, T. C, P.M. 117, P.P.G.S.B. 

SaHsbury, F. 262 (2 copies). 

Salter, K. G., 2131, P.P.G.W. 

Salwey, T. J., J.W. 611. 

Sewell, J., 1621 P.P.G.O. 

Smith, Bryce, P.M. 117, 1120, P.P.G.D. 

Smith, H. P., S.W. 1896. 

Smith, J. E., W.M. 262. 

Smith, W. T., W.M. 1621. 

Southam, J. D., J.W. 262 (2 copies). 

Southam, S. C, S.D. 262. 

Southwell, E. M., 1621. 

Southwell, H. B., P.M. 1621, P.P.G.O. 



Southwell, W. L., P.M. 1621, 262, P.P.G.W. (6 copies). 
SpauU, W. H., P.M. 1124, P.O. Sec, P.A.G.D. of C. 
Smallman, C. W., 1896. 

Taylor, John, I.P.M. & Sec. 1402, J.W. 328. 
Townsend, P.M. 117, 2311, P.P.G.S. of W. 
Tredinnick, E., 262. 
Trevor, A. S., P.M. 1621, P.P.G. Standard B. 

Urry, R., 1884. 

Venables, R. G., D.P.G.M. 

Vine, J., P.M. 117, P.P.G.S. of W. 

Wace, H. T., P.M. 262, P.P.G.S. of W. 

Wakeman, E. M., P.M. 262, P.P.G.W., P.P.G.S. of W. (Oxford) 

Wakeman, Sir 0., Bart., R.W.P.G.M. (14 copies). 

Walker, W. B., 117. 

Warren, G. Gordon, P.M. 1575, P.P.G.W. (Shrops.), P.P.G.R. 
(Staffs.) 

Watkiss, E., 1120. 

Watson, W., P.M. 61, 2069 P.P.G.S. of W. (West Yorks.) 

Watton, J., P.M. 117, 262. 

Webber, F., P.M. Sec. G.S.C.S.J. 33°. 

Westcott, W., P.M. 1621, P.P.G.A.D. of C. 

Whitefoot, T., Junr., P.M. & Sec. 1621, P.P.G.W. 

Williams, C. E., 1432. 

Williams, J., 117. 

Williams, R., J.W. 1896. 

Williams, T., 892. 

Withers, R. W. 0., 262. 

The Salopian Lodge, 262 (20 copies) 

The Salopian Chapter, 262 (2 copies). 

The Salopian Lodge of Charity, 117 (2 copies). 

St. John's Lodge, 601 (2 copies). 

The Lodge of the Marches, 611. 

The Lodge of St. Milburga, 1120. 



The Lodge of St. Oswald, 1124. 

The Fitzalan Lodge, 1432. 

The Olive Lodge, 1575. 

The Castle Lodge, 1621 (2 copies). 

The Audley Lodge, 1896. 

The Brownlow Lodge, 2131. 

The Lodge of St. Alkmund, 2311. 

Library Lodge Quatuor Ooronatorum (2 copies). 




CONTENTS. 



Preface ... 

Introduction by Bro. W. J. Hughan 

List of Subscribers 



PAGE 
iii 



History of Freemasonry in the Pro\'ince of Shropshire 

List of Existing Lodges 

List of Existing Chapters 

List of Extinct Lodges 

List of ProTiucial Grand Officers 

Lodge of St. Alkmund, Whitchurch, 2-311 

Grand Lodge Register of Wliitchurch Lodge, 388 ... 

Grand Lodge Register of Egerton Lodge, 445 ... 

BrowTilow Lodge, Ellesmere, 2131 

Audley Lodge, Newport, 1896 

Castle Lodge, Bridgnorth, 1621 ... 

Grand Lodge Register of Lodge of Industry, Bridgnorth, 578 

Grand Chapter Register of Agenorian Chapter, 118 

Clive Lodge, Market Drayton, 1 575 ... 

Grand Lodge Register of Anchor & Hope Lodge, Woore, 644 

Fitzalan Lodge, Oswestry, 1432 

Lodge of St. Oswald, Oswestry, 1124 

Lodge of St. Milburga, Ironbridge, 1120 

Lodge of the Marches, Ludlow, 611 

Grand Lodge Register of Mercian Lodge, Ludlow, 528 

Lodge of St. John, WelUngton, 601 

Grand Lodge Register of Wrekin Lodge, 445 ... 

Eyton Chapter, Wellington, 601 ... ... • 

Salopian Lodge of Charity, 117 
Salopian Lodge, 262, Section 1 (1788-1813) 
„ 2(1814-32) 

„ „ 3 (1836-92) 

Warrant of Salopian Lodge (Appendix A) 

Centenary Warrant of Salopian Lodge (Appendix B) 

Bye Laws (1788) (Appendix C) 

List of Members of Salopian Lodge (1788-1891) (Appendix D) 



1 

49 

50 

51 

52 

62 

63 

64 

66 

67 

68 

72 

76 

78 

79 

80 

81 

84 

85 

89 

90 

93 

94 

96 

104 

144 

168 

210 

212 

214 

219 



THE 

HISTORY OF FREEMASONRY 

IN THE 

Province of Shropshire. 
— •^-*<-» — 

have no intention of attempting to write a complete history 
of the Province of Shropshire. The materials necessary 
for the successful compilation of such a work, even if I possessed 
the special knowledge and ability requisite to use them properly, 
are not in my possession. Indeed, so far as I can ascertain, 
such materials, except with reference to comparatively recent 
times, are non-existent. None of the minute-books of any of the 
Lodges founded in this County during the last century are now 
available for reference, with the single exception of those 
belonging to the Salopian Lodge, 262.(1) Any knowledge of 
these Lodges must therefore be chiefly derived from Grand 
Lodge records, which are meagre in the extreme, and consist 
mainly, until the re-establishment of the Register of Members in 
1768, of the mere dates of the foundation and formal erasure of 
the several Lodges, together with a list of their several places of 
meeting. It is evident that such information, accurate though 
it be, can tell us nothing of lodge life, and give us little but the 
dry bones of the real history of the Province. 

The entire loss of the old lodge records necessarily 
involves also the loss of all knowledge of Provincial Grand Lodge 
Meetings, if any were in fact held ; for. Provincial Grand Lodges 
being in early times held only in Craft Lodges, it is to the 
records of the latter w-e must look, and look in vain, for 
information about Provincial transactions. 

(1) Some of those belonging to the Old Lodge of Industry at Bridgnorth are supposed 
to he in existence, but cannot yet be produced, A 



FREEMASONRY IN 



The obscurity that wraps up as with a veil the history of 
the Craft in the Province during the last century extends also to 
the first half of the present century, though not, perhaps, to such 
a marked degree. The records of the two Shrewsbury Lodges, 
dating from 1788 and 1815 respectively, d) cover between them 
this entire period (in no instance is there a hiatus in the 
minutes of both Lodges at the same time) and, as details of the 
Provincial history are slightly and occasionally noticed therein, 
some little light is thereby cast upon the general darkness. At 
best however, this light is but a flickering ray. 

I am however, convinced that Masonry, did not until 
about the year 1850 find a very secure footing in this County, 
and the complete annals of the Province in the last Century, 
and the early years of the present Century, if they ever are or can 
be written, would, in my opinion, show little of interest to the 
Craft in general. The Shropshire Lodges appear to have been 
throughout this period composed mainly of brethren of low social 
standing, who were content to discharge their Masonic duties 
quietly and unostentatiously, their path lying for the most part 
far aside, from the stream of conflict between "Ancients" and 
"Moderns, "(2) which was then the most notable feature of 
Masonic history. I must therefore necessarily content myself 
with such a slight outline of the history of the Province as the 
materials before me supply, and express the hope that it will 
prove sufficiently interesting to Salopian Masons to warrant its 
being written. 

The office of Provincial Grand Master was first created 
in the year 1726, and five years later, as is recorded by the 
Freemason's Calendar, Sir Edward Matthews was appointed to 
that dignity over the Province of Shropshire. Who Sir Edward 
Matthews was I have been unable to discover. His name does 
not appear in any of the " Histories of Shropshire," and he does 

(1) The Salopian Lod^e oE Charity 117, founded in 1810, did not settle in Shrewsbury 

till 1815, 80 that its earlier minutes do not apply to Shropshire. 

(2) A short sketch of the origin of these rival bodies, to which constant reference is 

hereafter made, will be found in the Salopian Lodge history under the year 1813, 
and should be read at once by those who are unacquainted with its details. 



THE PROVINCE OF SHKOPSHIEE. 



not seem to have been a member of any of our Shropshire County 
families. For five years he could have had no duties to discharge 
as the first lodge in the Province was not founded till 1736. It 
is impossible to say for what length of time he remained in ojffice, 
but assuming that he did so until the date of the next recorded 
appointment, he must have had at one time two lodges under 
his jurisdiction, the one at Shrewsbury already referred to as 
founded in 1736, and the other founded in 1744 at Oswestry. 
Of these Lodges we know nothing except the dates of their 
foundation, and their places of meeting ; and there is no reason 
to suppose that their existence was in any way due to the 
exertions of the P.G.M. 

It seems, on the contrary, far more probable that they 
were due to the presence of Brethren from Chester, in which 
city Masonry was early established on a firm basis, and which, 
as a Province, was the first in England to possess a Provincial 
Grand Master. It is also not improbable that some of the trav- 
elling bands of masons mentioned in Dr. Plott's Natural History 
of Staffordshire had early crossed the border into Shropshire. 
The following extract taken from the Much Wenlock Church 
Register, and included in the report of the Historical M.SS. 
Commission, seems to relate to a member of such a band. 

"Walter Hancox, freemason, was buryed the 16 day of 
" September [1599]. This man was a very skilfuU man in the 
" art of Masonry, in settinge of plottes for buildinges and 
" performinge of the same, ingravinge in alebaster and other 
" stone or playster, and in divers other giftes that belong to that 
" art, as dothe appeare by his workes whiche may be seene 
"in divers partes of England and Walles, most sompteouse 
" buildings, most stately tombes, most curyous pictures. And to 
" conclude in all workes he tooke in hand he hathe left behinde him 
" longe lastinge monuments of skilfull workmanship, and besides 
" these quaHtyes, he had others which passed these, he was a most 
" honest man, devout and zelouse in religion, pittifull to the poore, 
" and had the love and good-will of all his honeste neighbours." 



FREEMASONRY IN 



I must not be understood as asserting that Hancox was a 
speculative mason. I use the passage merely to show that the 
elements out of which speculative masonry developed, were, at 
an early date, present in Shropshire as well as in the bordering 
counties. 

Whatever may have been the chief factor in the founda- 
tion of the early Shropshire Lodges, it is abundantly evident that 
the period of their existence was but short, that they never were 
established on a secure foundation, and that there is no trace of 
a Provincial Grand Lodge in the modern sense of the phrase 
under the rule of Sir Edward Matthews, or for many years 
afterwards. 

The next name in the list of Provincial Grand Masters 
contained in the Freemasons' Calendar is that of George Durant 
(1774-1779). In the year 1753 it would, however, appear that 
Lord' Oarysfort, then Grand Ma3ter, appointed Sir Robert de 
Cornwall, Provincial Grand Master for the Counties of Worcester' 
Gloucester, Salop, Monmouth, and Hereford. Commenting on 
this appointment, especially with reference to the County of 
Gloucester, Bro. Sadler in his most interesting work " Thomas 
Dunckerley, his Life, Labours, and Letters," remarks, (i) that 
" Sir Robert was one of the more ornamental than useful sort, a 
merely nominal head of the Craft in the County, selected 
probably from motives of friendship, rather than from any 
special qualification for the post. With the exception of having 
attended a meeting of the Grand Lodge when his patron was 
present, (2) the records throw no light on whatever services he 
may have rendered to the Craft to merit this great distinction. 
The Book of Constitutions, published in 1767, contains a list of 
all the Provincial Grand Masters that had been appointed since 
the office was created (1726). This list was revised in 1769 with 
a view of printing the names of such as were still in existence, 
with the List of Lodges for 1770. Those who had not already 



(1) Pases 198-109. 

(2) " ~ 



Held at the Devil Tavern, Temple Bar, Nov. 23rd, 1753. 



THE PnOVINCE OP SHROPSHIllE. 



been superseded, were accordingly written to by the Grand 

Secretary, to ascertain whether they were dead or alive. He 

apparently acted under instructions, for against the name of Sir 

Robert de Cornwall is written 'Take no notice of him.' It is 

not therefore a matter of surprise that the name of this highly 

favoured brother should not be found in ' A List of the present 

acting Provincial Grand Masters' for 1770, nor does it appear in 

any subsequent list." His name is, however, now inserted 

in the Freemason's Calendar as P.G.M. for Gloucester, Hereford, 

Monmouth, and Worcester, and also for North Wales, and its 

omission from the Ust of P.G.M.'s for Shropshire I cannot account 

for. If it is properly included in the former lists, it ought also 

to be in the latter. Durant seems to have been of the same 

stamp as Sir Robert de Cornwall, and the remarks applied 

by Bro. Sadler to the latter might with equal justice be applied 

to the former, so far at all events as Shropshire Masonry is 

concerned. His jurisdiction, even if he exercised all that rightly 

belonged to his office, only extended over a nameless Lodge in 

Shrewsbury, 227, which was extinct in 1775, and the Lodge of 

Friendship at Bridgnorth, 413, which ceased to work before 1783, 

its number in that year being 322. He was a member of that 

old Shropshire family, which until quite recently had its seat at 

Tong Castle, near Shifnal, and was Member of Parliament for 

Evesham in Worcester in or about the year 1777.(i) A few facts 

about his Masonic career are also known. He was a member of 

the Somerset House Lodge No. 4,(2) prior to 1768, and was Grand 

Steward from May 1773 to May 1774, but he never attended 

Grand Lodge as a P.G.M., nor paid his fee on his appointment to 

that office. Except as above stated I do not think his name 

occurs in the records of the Craft, and his services to Shropshire 

Masonry may be considered as absolutely nil. We have no 

evidence that he was ever even a member of a Shropshire Lodge. 

From the fact that Shropshire is not mentioned as a Province in 

the Book of Constitutions published in 1784, it may be inferred 

(1) Hulbert's History of Shrewsbury, Appendix p. 17. 

(2) The junior o£ the four Lodges which united in 1717 to found the premier Grand 

Lodge of the world. 



FREEMASONRY IN 



that on the death or resignation of Durant, in 1779, no fresh 
appointment to the office of P.G.M. was made. Such an 
appointment would in fact have been almost objectless, as 
Masonry was tlien practically extinct in the County. From 
1783-1785 not a single Lodge was in existence. The latter year 
may be taken as the date of the revival of the Craft in the 
the Province. The chief actor in the revival, was a half-pay 
officer named Major Charles Shirreff, who in 1784 had retired 
from active service, and settled down at Whitchurch. 

A considerable number of his letters are still in existence, 
and from them some interesting information can be extracted. 
Some of them are quoted.^' by Bro. Sadler in his "Masonic Facts 
and Fictions," for the purpose of showing that letters intended 
for one of the rival Grand Lodges " Ancient and Modern," often 
got into the possession of the wrong faction, and were answered 
by the actual recipients as if the writers really belonged to their 
Constitution. These letters are most valuable for our purpose 
as they deal with Shropshire Masonry, but of such of them as 
are quoted by Bro. Sadler, I propose only to give a summary ; 
The first was addressed to Dr. Robert Bath, No. 399, Oxford 
Street, London, and is dated the 23rd April, 1785. It begins 
by stating that the writer was " An Antient Mason of 27 years 
standing," had " been Master of sev'l Lodges, and constituted 
one in the Island of Jersey," and not finding in Shropshire or 
Cheshire a Grand Lodge from whom he could obtain a deputa- 
tion to constitute a Lodge in Whitchurch, he wished to know 
the expense of obtaining one in London, and also desired to be 
put into communication with the Grand Secretary. In a post- 
script he adds " Please to remember that I keep up to Antient 
Masonry and will adhei-e to none other." His next letter 
addressed to " The Secretary of the Grand Lodge of London," ' 
was evidently enclosed under cover to Dr, Bath, and was by him 
handed to the Grand Secretary of the " Moderns " instead 
of to the Grand Secretary of the "Antients," for whom it 



(1) At pages 150-155, 



THE PROVINCE OF SHROPSHIRE. 



was doubtless intended. It is dated the 1st May, 1785, and 
reiterates his desire to form a Lodge at Whitchurch, though he 
"did not purpose working in the lower degrees of Masonry any 
more" after having retired from the Army. The next letter, 
dated the 27th June, 1785, is addressed to Mr. William White, 
Free Masons Hall, Great Queen Street, Lincolns Inn Fields, 
London, then the Grand Secretary of the "Moderns." It con- 
tains chiefly the writer's proofs of his being an "Antient" 
Mason. Curious though it may seem, some understanding was 
eventually arrived at between the "Antient" Mason, and the 
Grand Secretary of the "Moderns," for the Warrant for a 
Lodge at Whitchurch was ultimately granted to Major Shirreff. 
The delay of nearly seven months before the matter was finally 
completed, was, however, a great source of annoyance to him. 
Having arrived at the " Ne plus ultra" or 25th degree, as he 
himself repeatedly tells us, and " holding also a patent from the 
King of Prussia, through one of the Deputy Grand Inspectors in 
North America," he considered that more prompt attention 
should have been paid by Grand Lodge to any expression of his 
wishes, and this annoyance finds frequent expression in his 
letters. He had also a rather warm dispute with the Provincial 
Grand Lodge of Chester over a trifling mistake. Having 
obtained the promise of the Warrant from Grand Lodge, he 
wrote to Sir Robert Cotton, P.G.M. for that Province for his 
assistance in constituting the Lodge. This, so far as I can 
understand the matter, was regarded by the Provincial Grand 
Secretary of Chester, as an application for a Warrant, but he 
was speedily undeceived by Major Shirreff, who promptly 
asserted his independence of all authority except that of Grand 
Lodge. The Whitchurch Lodge was eventually constituted on 
the 15th November, 1785, and on the 17th of the same month 
the old soldier wrote to Mr. White as follows : — " On the 15th 
Inst., with the assistance of three Masters from Chester and two 
besides myself here,(i) I opened the Lodge in the usual way, and 

(1) In another letter he had stated that the only Mason besides himself in Whitchurch 
was a Fellow Craft. This was probably his Junior Warden Wm. L. Brookes who had 
been initiated whilst resident at the University of Cambridge at the age of 13 years. 



PEEEMASONRT IN 



haveing one above the number that can constitute ; it was 
accordingly done and named the Whitchurch Lodge No. 1, to 
be held at the White Lion Inn, in s'd town. * * * Agreeable 
to your desire I now send you a list of the Members that com- 
pose the Body, viz., C. Shirreff, Master ; Revd. Francis Henry 
Egerton, S.W. ; Wm. L. Brookes, J.W. ; Arthur Blaney, S.D. ; 
Wm. Turner, J.D. ; James Turner Meakin, Stew'd ; Revd. 
Godfrey Wooley, Treasurer ; Revd. John ColUer, Secretary ; 
Peter Newton and Richard Bentley, Tylers." 

Of Shirreff's methods of work in the Lodge thus created, 
we know nothing. Bro. Sadler remarks that " whether he 
continued to ' work in the Antient way ' or became modernized 
in his old age is not quite clear. I have carefully read his 
numerous letters, and they do not indicate any change in this 
respect, indeed I am inclined to believe that he was hardly 
the sort of person to be easily convinced that he had been 
wrong during the whole of his Masonic career." In December, 
1785, he again wrote to White, " I have the pleasure to acquaint 
you that every one seems determined to observe the Antient 
Custom of Masonry," " This," says Bro. Sadler, " coupled with 
the appointment of Deacons, seems to support my idea that 
he did not alter his mode of working." The early customs of 
my own Lodge No. 262, to which I shall hereafter have 
occasion to refer, <i' and the adoption of which was doubtless 
due to a great extent to his influence, will, I thinlc, materially 
strengthen the evidence upon this point, and show that Bro. 
Sadler's conclusion is probably correct. 

Having thus founded a lodge, Shirreff's next step was to 
obtain the re-establishment of Shropshire as a Province, and he 
at once intimated his intention of applying for the post of 
P.G.M. " provided," as he puts it, " it is within the reach of my 
Finances." As however, his income was at this time only 2/6 
per diem, being that of a half-pay officer, it was evident he 

(1) See Salopian Lodge History for the year 1788. 



THE PROVINCE OP SHROPSHIRE. 9 



could not undertake the expenses of such an office, and 
eventually he relinquished his intention in favour of his Senior 
Warden, as we shall presently see. 

The rest of Major Shirreff's correspondence with the Grand 
Secretary has, I believe, never been either published or quoted 
from, and I venture here to extract from it all passages that may 
interest Salopians. These extracts are of considerable length, 
but they convey information not to be otherwise obtained, and 
I believe they will afford in themselves a truer picture of the 
man and his work in the Province than any history I could 
concoct from them would present. I regret that much of interest 
must be omitted. Major Shirreff was accustomed to write freely 
of his knowledge of the so called "Higher Degrees," and the 
superiority of his method of imparting that knowledge ; his 
letters, too, show that he succeeded in infecting the Grand 
Secretary and other prominent Masons in London with his ideas 
upon this subject ; but such topics lie outside the scope of my 
present purpose, and cannot now be dealt with. It is evident 
that he was a constant sufferer from rheumatism and gout, and 
the length and legibility of his numerous epistles, are, considering 
the difficulties with which he had to contend, amazing. They 
are all dated from "Whitchurch in Shropshire,'' and are 
addressed to William White, the Grand Secretary. 



1. 

3Ist October, 17£5. 
" I shall observe the same Rules in this Lodge as I always did to admit none 
but Gentlemen, and as this is the first instance of one ever known here, 
in all probability as I will not admit the 2nd class, they may form a 
Hody, if so I hope their Warrent will express that tliey are to Look on 
our Lodge as the Head, &c., ic." 



This letter of course refers to the Whitchurch Lodge, 
which at this date had not been constituted. As will be seen 
hereafter another Lodge was subsequently founded in Whitchurch 



10 VREEMASONEY IN 



by Major Shirreff, and the implied superiority of the Lodge first 
in date, has an important bearing on the question hereafter 
discussed — Was there or was there not a real Provincial Grand 
Lodge in Shropshire during any part of the last century ? 



2. 

30th November, 1785. 

' The prospects I have in Establishing a Lodge of Respectability in this Town 
gives me pleasure, as I am the Founder of it, and as none of Its present 
members know nothing of its Progress ; and wishing that they should 
find what I have said is by no means to arrogate to myself any Merit 
but is my Due, you will "much oblige me to Let me know for their 
guidance what respect is Customary to be shown to the Founder of a 
Lodge : and the Past Master : as I do not mean always to be a Hack ; 
and at the same time when I resign the Chair, I do not give up my 
authority in that Lodge, being in the Superior Degrees which ihey 
have not attain'd to, I beg you will according to the English Constitu- 
tion draw this Line, as I have some who have been made in France, 
and as that Nation are too fond of intrigueing, their making of masons 
was not altogether to my way of thinking." 



From a letter dated the 17th December, 1785, we learn 
that five initiations had taken in the Whitchurch Lodge within 
a month of its being constituted. The names of the candidates 
were — Samuel Hodson, Peter Gregory, John Gregory, James 
Simpson, and Charles Gibbons. George Watson, who had been 
initiated at Chester, joined the lodge in the following month. 



3. 

6th February, 1786. 

'My S.W. the Kevd. Mr. Egerton, son of the Bishop of Durham's, and our 
Rector here left us ou the 3rd Inst., and from the Conversation that 
pass'd between us respecting the Fraternity, altho' he knows but very 
Little of it, yet as he will be advis'd by me, and appoint me his 
D.G.Mr., I have advis'd him as he is known to Ld. Effingham, to get 
appointed for the County, he being a man of family & fortune it will 
be the means of promoteing the Craft in this County, and wherein that 
is concern'd I always Yield, and espesially so when the person who tills 
the Chair, is ready to receive advice, in this case it is of Little moment 
who is in it, further on my own part I have never fiU'd any chair yet 
as a Mason, that I found any one Could talk to me ; but his answer 
was ready for him." 



THE PEOVINCE OF SHROPSHIRE. 11 

The recommendation contained in this letter was promptly- 
attended to as the Revd. F. H. Egerton was duly appointed 
P.G.M. for Shropshire shortly afterwards, and was installed by 
Shirreff in August, as we learn from the following extract. 



4. 

IstOctr., 1786. 
' Oil my return I forwarded your letter to the Wynnstay Lodge agreeable to 
your address, and wrote the Mastr. two letters myself : but not a Line in 
answer to any one of them, which makes me Conclude they have Either 
Ceased to meet, or Else removed the lodge out of this County. The 
Revd Mr. Egerton I had the Honour of Installing him our P.G.M. on 
the 10th of August, who appointed me his Deputy ; this was Inserted 
in this County's & also in Chester papers for the Guidance of those 
Conoern'd. As yet I have heard nothing from the Brethren at Bridg- 
north, now under the displeasure of the Gd. Lodge ; I should be 
happy they would put it in my power through you to Effect a 
Reconciliation. " 



The Wynnstay, was a Lodge at Oswestry, first founded 
in 1785, but not, so far as I can ascertain, originally established 
in Shropshire. Some further account of it will be found in 
connection with an extract from a later letter dated 2nd Febry., 
1789. With respect to the Bridgnorth Lodge, I conclude that 
the displeasure of Grand Lodge here referred to, arose from its 
neglect to furnish its proper yearly returns. It is stated by 
Bro. Lane to have been erased in 1783, yet it is curious, if that 
statement be correct, to find the Grand Secretary writing to its 
Master in 1786. Probably the Lodge ceased to work in 1783, 
and its erasure was ante-dated to suit that fact. The letter of 
the 2nd Febry., 1789, already referred to, shows that Shirreff 
was still in communication with the Grand Secretary about it in 
that year. The succeeding extracts refer principally to the 
Salopian Lodge. 

5. 

2nd June, 1788. 
" I have just received a letter from the Revd. Bro. Egerton, inclosing me a 
petition from several persons at Shrewsbury praying him as P.G.M. 
for the Coiiuty to grant them a Warrants as some luformatiou 



12 FEEEMASONEY IN 



is further Necessary previous to Its being made out, have accordingly 
written to them at Shrewsbury to be particular in answering my Letter, 
in the Interim will be much Oblig'd to you if you will be pleas'd to 
make out for me a Rough Form how these P.G. Warts, are made out, 
Leaving the Blanks to fill up, against I have the pleasure of seeing you, 
which will be soon after the 12th Inst, as t Leave this on that day for 
Town, and any other Information you can give me for the Conduct of 
P.G. Lodges, be so kind as to minute them down for me." * * * 



6. 

1st July, 1788. 

' I am now to acquaint you that in Consequence of my writeing to Shrews- 
bury the intended Master with two of the Officers of the new Lodge to 
be Formed waited on me, and I have granted him a Dispensation to act 
&c. till their Warrent of Constitution is made out, which that you 
may be enabled to do, I transmit you the following particulars about 
it, viz. — Their Petition for a Wart, was dated 1.3th May last. 
AVilliam Neal, Master; Thomas Barkley, Sour. Warden; William 
Cotton, (1) Junr. Warden ; John Beck, Tresr. ; John Brackley Prichard, 
Secty. ; John Hall, Senr. Deacon ; Edward Inis,(2) Junr. Deacon ; and 
Michael Kavanagh, Tyler. The Lodge to be called the Salopian Lodge 
No. 1, and to be held at the sign of the Fox, in the town of Shrews- 
bury, County of Salop, and their time of meeting to be on the first 
Tuesday in every mouth. As I expect Kevd. Mr. Egerton here very 
shortly, I beg you will have the Warrent made out in the same form 
as that of ours here for No. 1 Whitchurch, & send it as soon as you 
can, that I may have it ready for the P.G. Mr. to sign on his joining us, 
as his stay will not be long here ; vhere it is to be sigu'd mark with 
your Pencil, & in your note please inform me whether any one is to 
sign it besides the P.G. P. {sic) as he means to sign it himself. * * 
When you make out this Warrent, I hope you Avill give it the No. as 
you said you would. I want a neat Lodge Bible about 2 gu., or a 
little more, and buch a Book of Constitutions as you sent to the Barry 
Lodge, both books to be bound alike, and Embellished in a Decent 
planner. I beg leave to observe to you that the Form at the beginning 
of the Wart, may run thus (instead of We Francis Henry Egerton as 
Mr. Sweetenborg's copy is) We the Kevd. Francis Henry Egerton, &o., , 
ke., kc, P.G.Mr, for the County of Salop, & so on &c. 



From the copy of the Warrant given in Appendix A, it 
■will be seen that the P.G.M. never signed it. Shirreff, however, 
signed it both as D. P.G.M. and also as P.G. Secretary. The 
number was not given to the Lodge until some time afterwards. 
The Barry Lodge is again mentioned in these letters, a short 
account of it will be found in the Salopian Lodge History under 
the year 1788. 

(1) This sViouia be Cottom, but it is correctly spelled in the Warrant. 

B) Also spelled in this manner in the Warrant; the name reaUy is " Innya." 



THE PROVINCE OF SHUOPSIIIEE. 13 



7. 

30tli July, 17SS. 
'This is to request yon will have made for me six- wliite collars & send 
them add ress'd to me here. When fiuish'd they are intended for the 
Salopian Lodge. I am in hopes tliis may catch you in time to send 
them with the Bihle &o., hat the Warrent I do not care how soon you 
sent it for reasons already told yon, & the Expense Attending the 
whole I shall take proper Steps to have you repaid." 



ledi August, 1788. 
' I rec'd yonrs of the 5th Inst , and in a few days after the Paper Parcel safe 
& in good order, and as I was to see the JIastcr and some of the 
Officers of the Lodge on the lith (our Lodge Night) was my reason for 
not answering y'r favor sooner ; they came as expected, and I 
presented them with their IJible, &c., they were much pleas'd with 
everything sent, & particularly desired me to return you their kind 
thanks, ami that they were much oblig'd to you. I have set them 
agoing, & doubt not they will be a most Respectable Lodge ; & I 
purpose as D. P.G. M. now and then to visit them and to see how they 
come on. You signified to me in a former Lor. the expense of a \Vt. 
would be £i lis. 6d. * * and our P.G.II. Wt. says that for 
every Wt. of Constitution we grant we shall send to the G.T. of the 
Society in London £5 5s. Od. 1 apprehend this is a mistake by half- 
a gu. too much, however, agreeable to the sum Specified in the P.G.M. 
Wt. I now remit you for the purpo.ses therein mention'd five gnineasd) 
& also to repay your acc't £i 2s. 8d., making the sum of £9 7s. 8d. 
as above mention'd. * * * Masonry I have much at Heart, and I 
am in hopes ere long to send you a list of names for a fresh Wt. I 
shall ever be happy in promoting the Welfare of the Society, and I may 
venture to tell yon, there is but lew on the List (Considering Situa- 
tions) That's done more for its prosperity than I have. * * * 



17th Sep., 1788. 

' I am just return'd from visiting the Barry and Salopian Lodges, and it 
gives me much Satisfaction to inform you I approve of there [sic) Con- 
duct in all respects, the Latter Lodge has as yet rec'd no Qnaterly {sic) 
Communication, and I again request you will give me the No. of their 
Lodge." 



(11 The Salopian Lodge doly repaid the D.P.G.M. five guineas for the Warrant, so that 
the mistake, if any, was never rectified. The Si 2s. 8d. was for the Bible, &c., 
pmohased for the Lodge as mentioned in an earlier letter. 



14 FBEEMASONRY IN 



10. 

2nd Febry., 1789. 

" I observe what you say ab't D.P.G.M. Jewel amounting to ab't 30/- which 
I shall leave intirely to your Taste as far as two Guineas will go, & a 
proper Ribbon to wear with it, if I am within Compass for a Neat one 
so far good, but I shall not mind a few shillings more, as I think I 
can't be turn'd out of olBce (unless I act not in character), is my motive 
for being at this Expence willing to add to the Dignity of Masonry all 
in my power. Every Inquiry has been made by me Respecting the 
Lodj^e held in Oswestry ; none I am told has been held there for some 
years past, the Wynnstay Lodge No. •S24 formerly did Assemble there 
have left this county, & I am inform'd meet in Wales, so that is not 
in our District ; the Lodge No. 322, formerly held at Bridgnorth (now 
erased) have heard nothing of them, & I now acquaint you that there 
are no more Lodges held to my knowledge in this district than you 
have already been inform'd of by me. * * * in all probability 
more Lodges will soon be in this County, & it is ray intentions to do 
the business as concisely as possible, so that the Craft shall flourish, 
and the orders of the Grand Lodge punctually observ'd, & if the 
Lodges are once made acquainted from you that in all business of 
Jlasonry must come to you through us, this matter will be Adjusted to 
the Satisfaction of us both. I with pleasure inform you that another 
Lodge is agoing to be fix'd here w'ch is approv'd of by the P.G. Jlr., 
it will Cost me much trouble, as I must Constantly attend (they being 
Young in the business) to act as ilr. is my reason for now desireing 
you will Leave a space for one to be inserted by us whenever we can find 
one that is fit for the office, but as I shall keep them close at it, hope 
shortly to Effect it, as I spare no pains for the good of iVIasonry — there 
petition to us was dated on 25th Deer. Last. Oificers to wit — 



.Master (this for us to fill up). 



JOHN PERRY, SW., age 34. Profession— Waiter. 

"WALTER THOMAS, J.W., do. 24 , Clock & Watch Maker 

HENJAMIN LAKIN, Tleasr. do. 34 ,, Cabinet Maker. 

WILLIAM DODD, Secty., do. 30 „ Grocer. 

JOHN HROOKES, S.D., do. 27 ,, Shoemaker. 

JOHN HINTON, J.D., do. 24 „ Shoemaker. 

PETER WRIGHT, Tyler, do. 43 „ Inn Holder. 

The Lodge to he called the Egerton Lodge No. 2 at Whitchurch, to be 
held in this Town at the sign of the Coach & Horses, & to assemble 
on the last Monday in each Month, so that you will please make out 
the Wart. Sevl. others will join us in a few days, haveing Granted 
leave for that purpose • * * P. S. In order to bring a Bror. on to 
fill the chair as soon as possible, its my intention, that myself or one 
of our Past Mr. do always attend them when they meet (or to adjust 
the business, w'ch will not be long in doing, as two of the members 
were Master Masons in Chester, and are now Remov'd to this town to 
reside." 



It is somewhat curious to observe that none of the officers 
of the Egerton Lodge mentioned in this letter were registered in 
Grand Lodge. 



THE PROVINCE OP SHROPSHIRE. 15 

As will be seen hereafter Shirreff miscalculated the length 
of his tenure of the office of D.P.G.M., so that his purchase of 
the jewel mentioned in this letter proved a bad investment. 
The Wynnstay Lodge appears to have been founded at Wynn- 
stay, in Denbighshire, in 1771, by the grandfather of the late 
R.W.P.G.M., and to have removed to Oswestry in 1785, without 
the knowledge of Grand Lodge. If Shirreff's account of its 
movements be correct, it seems to have returned over the border 
into Wales shortly afterwards, such removal being likewise with- 
out permission. Its erasure is dated 1789, and probably took 
place as an immediate consequence of this letter. The case of 
the Bridgnorth Lodge, called the Lodge of Friendship, has been 
already referred to in connection with Shirreff's fourth letter. 
The establishment of the Egerton Lodge, brought the number of 
Lodges in the Province at this date up to three, not including 
the Barry Lodge, a military Lodge in the 34th Regiment, then 
stationed at Shrewsbury. The usual Book of Constitutions, . 
Bible, Collars, and other lodge requisites, were purchased by 
Shirreff from the Grand Secretary for the Egerton Lodge. 

11. 

June 3rd, 1789. 
" I am just return'd from visiting my friends (at Newport, Shefnal, Welling- 
ton, Shrewsbury, Ellesmere, Wrexham, and Namptwich) * • * 
bein" in hopes Ere Long to receive Applications to set 3 or 4 more 
Lodges agoing, so you will see Masonry I have much at heart as well 
abroad as at home. * * * I have dated the Wart, the day of their 
Petition, viz., 1st Janry., 1789, and appointed their olBcers as follows— 
ISro. Walter Thomas to be Master, Bro. Robt. Barrow Jones, S.W., 
and Bro. Benjamin Lakin J. W. * * * I inspected the Lodges 
when in Shrewsbury, & found everything going on Right. The 
Ensuing Festival of St. John being our Triennial return, that Masons 
generally observe in the Country, Its my intentions that the Lodges in 
this County do attend me on that day, in order to proceed to Church 
and Dine together. The Barry Lodge on acct. of the militia being 
Embodied are remov'd from Shrewsbury, wh'ch prevents them from 
attending us, and I am inform'd they mean to apply for leave to go in 
procession on their Return. As the day will have been observ'd 
a<Jreeable to Antient Custom, I shall not be fond of bringing up new 
Precedents, but should they apply, refer them to the P.G.M. & give 
him my opinion, for I think going too often in procession looks more 
like Parade, &c., therefore once in three years is suflicieut, I hoije you 
will agree with me," * « « * 

The Warrant here referred to was that of the Egerton 
Lodo-e. The 34th Regiment in which the Barry Lodge was 



16 FREEMASONRY IN 



formed, was moved to Oswestry from Shrewsbury during the 
training of the militia ; the same thing took place in 1788, as may 
be seen from the files of the Shrewsbury Chronicle (June 28th. 
1788). The Salopian Lodge History for 1789 contains a fuller 
account of the procession thus arranged by ShirreiF. The 
inclusion of Wrexham and Nantwich in the list of visits paid by 
the D.P.G.M. is a proof that he had indeed " Masonry much at 
heart," for those towns lie outside the Province of Shropshire. 
Shortly after that date, viz., in 1793, a Lodge, No. 520, was 
founded at Nantwich, which survives to the present day, and is 
now No. 293 on the roll. Another Lodge was also constituted 
in the same town in 1794, No. 543, but it did not long survive, 
and in 1810 its warrant was assigned to a Lodge in the Cornwall 
Militia, with the new number 618. No lodge was founded in 
Wrexham exactly at this period, but in 1802 the Warrant of the 
Lodge of Peace and Good Neighbourhood, 548, originally consti- 
tuted at Wynnstay, in Denbighshire (1795), (i) was re-issued to a 
Lodge in that town. Curiously enough in the year I&IO the 
Warrant thus re-issued to a Wrexham Lodge, was assigned to a 
Lodge at Truro, with the new number 620. This re-issuiag and 
assignment of warrants of extinct Lodges, will be considered 
more fully at a future page in connection with the history of the 
Lodge of the Marches 611, and the Salopian Lodge of Charity 
117. It may be sufficient here to notice that the re-issues of the 
Warrants above referred to, were diiferent from the examples 
of similar practices to be noted in connection with the last men- 
tioned Lodges, inasmuch as new numbers were given to the new 
Lodges, the Warrants were retained by Grand Lodge, and fresh 
ones were issued containing recitals referring to the old Lodges. 
The advantage of this method was that full fees, as for the con- 
stitution of a new Lodge, were exacted in each instance. I am 
informed by Bro. H. Claud Lisle, Secretary of the Nantwich 
Lodge 293, that, unfortunately, the first minute book of that 
Lodge is not now in existence, so that we cannot definitely 
ascertain if Shirreff took any active part in its foundation. 

(1) This Lodge must not be confounded with the older one founded in the same place 
in 1771, removed to Oswestry in 1785, and ei"ased in 1789 as before mentioned. 



THE PROVINCE OP SHROPSHIEE. 17 



12. 

In this letter the Grand Secretary is asked for informa- 

on three doubtful points. 

6th July, 1789. 

" 1st Myself as founder of the Lo. & of Course P.SI., whether or not in the 
absence of the Mr. as P.M. & all P.M. have not a Right to the Chair 
& to do the business in Preference to the S. W. as it but too often 
happens they are Ignorant and know not how to Conduct matters, & 
for P.M. to be GoveruVl by Novices appears to me not Masonic. 

2nd— In my official Capacity as D.P.G.M. have I not a Right to the Chair 
when I chuse it on any meeting of Masons to open and close the Lo. 
& to do the business, but particularly so in the Lo. I am a P.M. & 
member of. 

3rd— Whenever the Lo. meet & the Mr. is present and the P.G.M. or his 
Depty. are there, & do not chuse to take the Chair that Evg. 
should not the M. previous to opening & Closeing pay the Compt. to 
the Gd. Mr. or Depty. to know their pleasure, this was the mode I 
ever saw in America. ... ... ... I wish to do right, & 

what is now mention to you & Bro. H. is in confidence. Last 
Saturday I initiated Sir RichJ. Hill ; John Hill, Esqre. ; Revd. Brian 
Hill ; & Mr. John Hill, Junr. who join'd our body as Members, the 
Latter being rather nnder Age, a Dispensation was granted for his 
Introduction ; at the Proper time you shall have a Regular Acc't of all 
our proceedings & balances &c. from our Lodges sent you." * * * 

The ideas of Major Shirreff as to the conduct of Lodge 
business seem to have been peculiar. With respect to his first 
question, he was clearly in the wrong, as the point seems to have 
been expressly provided for on page 395 of the Constitutions of 
1784. Bro. H. here referred to was James Heseltine, G.S. till 
1784, and S.G.W. and G.T. in the following year. He seems to 
have been especially struck with Shirreff's " ne plus ultra " 
notions. John Hill was M.P. for Shrewsbury at this time, and 
W.M. of the Egerton Lodge in the following year. 

13. 

26th Septr., 1789. 

* » * * "On the 14th Inst, a Petition from Sevl. Brethren at 
Wellington to the Revd. Francis Henry Egerton, P.G.M. , praying for 
a Warrent &c. was approv'd of by him, so that you will be pleased to 
have a Warrent drawn out Nominateing Bro. Thomas Jukes Collier, 
Master; Bro. William Emery, S.W. ; and Bro. Richard Phillips, J. W., 
thereof to be named the Wrekin Lodge, And to meet on the last Friday 
in each Month previous to the full Moon at the Talbot Inn, in the Town 
of Wellington County of Salop. There are a number of Candidates to 
join them, and I doubt not they will be a good Society, and at the 

C 



18 TREEMASONRY IN 



usual time I shall send you a particular Ace't of tliem with all arrears 
&c. from every Lodge in the County. * * * Please put the No. of 
the Lodge to the Wart., and I hope this will he in time to insert the 
New Lodge in the next F. M. Kalendar for the Eiisuiug year. We have 
had no Quarterly Communication for a Long while— the Wart, may be 
dated, if you think proper, on the 4th Inst., the day they made 
application." » * * 

The usual order for a neat Bible and neat Book of Con- 
stitutions, and six white collars follows in due course ; the 
D.P.G'.M. seems to have regarded the furnishing of the Lodge as 
part of his official duty. As in the case of the Egerton Lodge 
already noticed, the names of the first officers of the Wrekin 
Lodge were not registered in Grand Lodge. 

14. 

21st Deer., 1789. 

" I rec'J your. favour of the 24th Octr. in Answer to which am to Acquaint 
you, that as soon after the 28th Inst., It is in my power, I will Collect 
ifrom the dilft. Lodges there arrears to that Period, & transmit you a 
regular Acct. & send you an order for the Cash as usual. * » * 
Tlie Wait. &c. for the Wellington Lodge, I beg may be forwarded as 
soon as possible, that the P.G.M. may sign it previous to his leaving 
us abt. the Middle of next month. * * * 
This morning I sent you ofif by waggon for the blossoms Inn, 
Lawrence Lane address'd for you as this le'r. a turkey kill'd yesterday, 
it is in Its feathers & undrawn ; hope it will get safe and prove 
acceptable to your good woman. * * You will much oblige 
us to send three proper candles for the Lodge, and the price, which I 
will repay you with thanks." 

15. 

14th Septr., 1790. 

* * * "I have the pleasure to inform you that JIasonry flourishes 
in this County, and that all disputes with the S, Lodge are happily 
terminated, and the Different Bodies assembled at Shrewsbury on the 
31st Augt., went in procession to Church, din'd together, 88 of us, 
Clos'd the Lodge at 6 o'clock, & I was off directly afier for Home ; 
everything was conducted to give satisfaction, and would have been 
completely so had it not been for the Officiousness of a Brother, whom 
I was Obliged to call to order several times ; he was a visitor & the 
most troublesome one I ever had to manage, the Brethren tho't I was 
too mild with him, but Lenity I think at all times is best. He is by 
his own Acct. a very great Mason, now Master of three Lodges, and 
S. W. of a fourth Lodge in London, & pretends to have a thorongh 
knowledge of you & my wortliy Hro. Hesseltine, & I am since 
inform'd he disapproves of my Conduct, & means to relate it to you, 
if so, you will know the Man, and that is my reason for not Announce- 
ing his Name in this, in hopes he may think better of it ; he talks 
much of his power, and if Justice is not done him, he can have you 
& I turn'd out of office ; this is just intended for your Information, 



THE PROVINCE OP SHEOPSHIRE. 19 



that should this Genins heave in sight, j'ou may be prepar'J to answer 
him, for had he had his desert, it would have been to quit us, not 
above 5, if so many, in the room but would have been glad of it, but 
talcing him altogether to be not right in his head, I tho't it best to act 
as I did, for he had such an opinion of himself plainly indicated to me 
I could not reform him, and happy was your friend when he quitted 
hira. In due time you shall have sent you by me the returns of the 
Difft. Lodges & the Cash from each, &c. I beg to know whether you 
have done anything respecting our Lodge chairs. Mr. Egerton I 
expect soon to be with us." » « * 

Some further account of this great meeting at Shrewsbury 
will be found in the Salopian Lodge History for 1790. Nothing 
in connection with the dispute with the S(alopian) Lodge appears 
upon its minute books, but we learn its nature from a letter of 
the P.G.M. dated the 5th July, 1790, which has been preserved 
in Grand Lodge. It appears that in Febry. the Salopian Lodge 
applied for a Dispensation to walk in procession on St. John's 
Day. This was refused by the P.G.M. as it would have inter- 
fered with the other Lodges in the county. Thereupon the 
Lodge appealed to Grand Lodge. The issue of that appeal we 
do not know, but evidently some compromise was arrived at, for 
the Lodge did not go in procession on St. John's Day, though 
they had previously advertised their intention so to do, but joined 
with the other Lodges in the county in the procession of the 31st 
August, to which Major Shirreff's letter refers. Egerton's letter 
is too long to be quoted here, but in appealing to the Grand 
Secretary for advice, he shows a large mindedness and sense of 
fairness very different from the more arbitrary spirit of his 
Deputy. 

16. 

11th Jan., 1791. 

* * * * " Should anything happen to prevent my recg. their 
accounts (wch. I can't think will be the case) so as not to be in time 
for their Insertion in the next Q.C., I beg you will for the Whitchurch 
Lodge Insert for Eegistg. Fees 5/- ; Grand Charity, two guineas ; & 
for the Cumberland School one guinea (which I request you'll pay to 
the Secty. of that Society) for the Egerton Lodge Kegisreiing Fees 
£1 2s. 6d. & for the Grand Charity, half-a-gninea. * * * The 
name you wish to know — shall inform you, but it must rest with your 
self, I take him to be a very Eccentric Man. Look at your Alphabet 
in the 7th Degree, and observe the follg.— will tell you his name (here 
follows the name in cypher.) * • * 'Pwo letters have 
paas'd between me & Captain Bridgewators at Ludlow, wanting tha 



20 FREEMASONRY IN 



r.G.M. to let liim act under the Old AVart. Granted to the Sion Lodge 
in 1772, in New York, & sign'd Peter Middleton, Esqre., D.l'.G.M., 
under Sir John Johnson, Bart., P.G.M. My answer is as there is no 
one Bro. but himself present belonging to that Lodge, lie can't act as 
an Individual by that Wart., & of course a new one is Necessary for 
the Establishing of one in Ludlow, w'ch he seems to Acquiesce in, so 
that I expect shortly to send to you on their business. Harmony at 
present prevails among the Lodges, & I shall do all iu my power for 
its Continuance." 



The name given in this letter in cypher is evidently that 
of the " Officious Brother " mentioned in the previous letter. I 
cannot interpret the cypher of the 7th or any other degree, but 
I believe the person referred to was Thomas Dunckerley, of whom 
I will have something further to say hereafter in connection with 
the resignation of the D.P.G.M. 

The expectation of founding a Lodge at Ludlow was never 
realized by Shirreff, as no Lodge was constituted there until the 
year 1805. 

17. 

29th June, 1791. 
* f * * "The P.G.M. has made me acquainted that His Patent 
is made out for four more Counties, which he Names, and offers to 
appoint me as His Deputy to Each on Condition of Vacateingit, in either 
or all of the counties of Stafford, Flint, Denbigh, & Montgnmery, 
in case he should think it expedient or Necessary to appoint a Depty. 
Avho shall be Resident in the County for wch. he is D. P. G. Mr. — My 
answer — " Well knowing that much ease as well as pleasure must 
accrue to the P.G.M. provided his choice of an Assistant to act in the 
above mentioned Counties turn'd out favourable was my only motive 
for Tendering you my services 'Till such time as you can meet with 
Deputy Provincial Gd. Masters to your Approbation, that will Discharge 
their Duty as such, agreeable to the Book of Constitutions in each 
County. I am willing to act as such, and shall always be happy to 
have it in my power to render anything you undertake Propitious." 
The Last Q.C. I reed, from you and sent off to the Diift. Lodges in 
the County were dated Febry., 1791, so that those in Arrear will I hope 
E're long with my Books Heave in sight." » * « 

Egerton is stated in the Free Masons Calendar to have 
been appointed P.G.M. for the County of Stafford in the year 
1786. As I have now in my possession a letter from him dated 



THE PROVINCE OF SHEOPSHIEE. 21 



the 13th April, 1791, addressed to the Grand Secretary, in which 
he states that he would " consider it as an honor and an obliga- 
tion to be appointed Provincial Grand Master" for the four 
counties mentioned in Shirreii's btter, it is clear that the Calen- 
dar has ante-dated his appointment by at least five years. 

18. 

27 til Octr., 1791. 
" My last to you bears date 22iul ultimo. Acknowledging the receipt of my 
Books and the Q.G. and I then aequainted you that I had by Hie 
P.G.M. desire forwarded a Circular Ler. to the Lichfield, Wolver- 
hampton, and Denbigh Lodges, dated 12th Septr., but no answer as 
yet come to either of them w'ch I am surpris'd at." * * * 

This letter is interesting as showing the strength of the 
Craft in two of the new Counties committed to the care of the 
P.G.M. for Shropshire. None of these Lodges written to by 
Shirreff have survived to the present time. 

19. 

22nd April, 1792. 
"Yesterday I forwarded a Petition to the Revd. Mr. Egerton from one Bro. 
Innys a member of the Salopian Lo. Setting forth his unhappy Situa- 
tion w'ch was corroborated by the Mr. Wardns., & most of the inembeis 
Craving relief from the Gd. Lo. previous to which he wrote mo for the 
Necessary Mode of Application my answr. was through the P.G.II. for 
the County & from him to the G. L., instead of which it seems as if 
No. 525 did not wisli to have anything to do with the P.G.M. or his 
Depty. , as they have address'd his Petition to His Royal Highness the 
Prince of Wales, & I have given them to understand for want of the 
Necessary Formalities, I should not be surpris'd if it was returned back 
to be corrected, had they sent it in time as they might have done 
Mr. Egerton was here present ; & then it would have been settled by 
him. Our Last Regular Lodge being on the 5th Inst, and the Ensuing 
St. John's day being the Triennial return for the Brethren to go in 
procession to Church, the P.G.II. being present gave his Consent, & as 
he will not be here on that day the whole will Lay upon me, and there 
being at pre.sent no P. G. Lodge as yet appointed I beg for the 
satisfaction of myself, as there are many opinions, k I wish to act 
light, whether there being no P.G. L. it is not still in my power to 
Summons the Jl asters and Officers of the Difft. Lo. in the County to 
attend me as D. P.G.M. to Church on that day, & if I am not to nom- 
inate whose is to Preach. * » * ijijg jjjgj thing I want to 
know is the Order of Precedency in the Procession to & from Ch. ,*,, 
Lately I had an acct. from the Denbigh Lodge by a friend of mine that 
they had sent there arrears, so that when I receive them you shall hear 
from me, as for the Wolverhampton Lodge I have never heard from 
them yec in Answer to many Lers. I wrote to thein but this must be 
settled by the P.G.M." • » * 



22 PEEEMASONEY IN 



The Petition of Bro. Innys was, notwithstanding the 
want of the "Necessary Formalities,'' successful; his case is 
fully treated of in the Salopian Lodge History. The procession 
here referred to never took place, but it is curious to note how 
much importance our brethren of long ago attached to the 
successful carrying out of such ceremonies. This letter is 
especially valuable for the reference it makes to the non- 
existence of a Provincial Grand Lodge. 



20. 

22ud Septr., 1792. 

" My best wishes to ray friend Bror. Heseltine, I am glad to find he is much 
better, there is such good pickings, as also Tit-bits in the eating way, 
& good Liquors to Moisten the Clay, in tlie Vicinity of Doctor's 
Commons that I am not surpris'd at Esquire Gout Calling on him and 
I should be fearful he would visit also my friend the G.S. was there 
many Gd. Feast days in the Year. I know this gentleman well and 
when any signs of his calling appears, I drink a Glass of Genuine Wine 
which drives him from the Head, and Stomach into tlie feet, where ho 
takes up his_'abode, and then iu a Little while he is off." * * * 

This extract is hardly of Masonic interest, but the cure 
for the Gout mentioned in it is probably unique, and is, like the 
present of the Turkey, inserted to complete, as far as possible, 
the picture of the D.P.G.M. as a man. 

21. 

1st June, 1793. 

" I wrote j-ou on the lOtli of April last for a Warrant for the Friendly 
Jirothcrs to Hold a Lodge at Newcastle, & on the 19th ultimo I 
reminded you about it, & my now again doing it is in Consequence of 
my receiveing a Ler. from them this morning, wishing me to attend for 
to Constitute their Lodge on Wednesday 5th Instant, but not having 
reod. their Warrant -this cannot be done, and have accordingly signified 
the same to them, and I again beg you will be pleas'd to forward it to 
me. In my letter of the 19th May I made you acquainted of my visit 
to the Lodges in Staffordshire." * * « 



This letter of the 19th May is not in my possession, so 
that I cannot give any information, as I would wish to do, about 
this visit to Staffordshire, 



THE PEOVINCE OP SHROPSHIRE. 23 



22. 

nth June, 1793. 

* * . * "As mattera have tnrn'J out -n-hich I am persuaded 
■was owing to youi' kind inteiference it was judged Right in you not to 
deliver my Ler. to ISior. D. and ffom what you relate I am satisfied, 
it is never my intentions to wound the feelings of any Man Especially 
one in Years, but when complaints aie piefer'd which Afl'eiits me, you 
must join with me, that it is reasonable for me to vindicate myself in 
such cases." 



I imagine this letter refers to the old quarrel between 

Shirreff and Dunckerley, but at best this can only be a matter of 

conjecture. 

23. 

3rd Jan., 1795. 

"I am much oblig'd to you for your very kind favour of the 28th Nov., and 
am sorry to find by yonr Ler. that there is no remedying the Evil I 
complain of & that any Power should be plac'd in the hands of any 
One who cares not a farthing for Masonry, this I know for a fact, and 
I now shall observe the Old Maxim vizt. — Meddle with Dirt & it will 
stick to your fingers— as I have now done with him for ever. * * * 
As Mr. E. gave it as his opinion that I had not in general given Satis- 
faction to the Lodges under his Jurisdiction without specefying from 
whence Originated any Complaint, for my own Justification I wrote 
each. of them a Ler. dated 10th Novr. last, from No. Hi and No. 434 
their answers have been very satisfactory, but very much so from our 
own Lodge No. 388 : who dined together on St. John's day and I had 
been Master for two years together, & was for giving up the Chair, but 
they would not Listen to it, but re-elected me Mr. for this year, & 
order'd my Ler. A their Sentiments on it, to be recorded in the Lodge 
Books— the other Lodges have not as yet taken any notice of my Ler. 
which surprises me. * * * Yon may depend upon it, so long as 
the Present person acts. Masonry will dwindle, for he is despised by 
lis all. * • * There was a Wart, wanted for a Lodge at Tam- 
worth in Staffordshire and another at Holywell in Flintshire, what ho 
has done abt. it I know not, & as for a Deputy he will find it a 
dithcult matter to find one after his treatment of me." « * * 

This letter indicates a serious quarrel between the P.G.M. 
and his Deputy, and one which was never made up. Four or 
five other subsequent letters of Shirreff carry the mat'ter no 
further, and we have no definite knowledge of the cause of the 
dispute. One thing is clear, that Shirreff took the action of the 
P.Gr.M. in dismissing him from his office of Deputy with a very 
bad grace, and, from the Chair of the Whitchurch Lodge, did his 
best to prove his independence of the P.G.M. by communicating 
directly with the Grand Lodge about matters which, whilst 



24 TREEMASONRY IN 



Deputy, he had always instructed the Lodges to communicate 
through the Provincial Officials. If I might hazard a suggestion, 
I would say that most probably this dispute arose from Shirreff's 
continued practice of "Ancient" Customs in Lodges established 
'under the "Modern" constitution. If I am correct in supposing 
that the " Officious Brother " mentioned in his fifteenth letter 
was Thomas Dunckerley, this theory attains a higher degree o£ 
probability. Dunckerley, commonly believed to have been an 
illigitimate son of George II., was an ardent and enthusiastic 
adherent of the " Moderns," and was undoubtedly possessed of 
considerable influence in their Grand Lodge Councils, (i) He 
was in 1790 P.G.M. for Hereford, as well as several other of the 
Western Counties, and his presence in Shrewsbury in that year 
was a not improbable event, as Provincial Grand Lodges, in 
early times, were often attended by Lodges not within their 
jurisdiction. His officiousness probably consisted of protests 
against some of Shirreff's "Ancient" methods of working, and 
these protests if carried to Grand Lodge as was threatened, 
would in due course have led to Egerton's interference with his 
Deputy. From Shirreff's 22nd letter, written in June, 1793, it 
is evident that the occurences of 1790 had by no means been 
forgiven or forgotten, and it is easily to be imagined that the 
dispute continued until the following year, and so the quarrel 
with Dunckerley led directly to the quarrel with Egerton. The 
discontinuance of the appointment of Deacons as Officers of 262 
from the year 1791, and the cessation of the practice of installing 
the W.M. of the same Lodge from the year 1793 until the Union, 
raises a strong presumption that Egerton was at this period inter- 
fering with his Deputy, and converting his " Ancient " method 
of working into conformity with the practices of the "Modern" 
Grand Lodge. From the character of the man, and knowing 
from his letters the poor opinion he held of Egerton's Masonic 
knowledge, we can readily believe that Shirreff would have highly 
resented any interference with his work, and any exhibition 

(IJ The rank of Past Senior Grand Warden was granted to him in 1786, " in grateful 
testimony of the high sense the Grand Lodge entertains of his zealous and 
indefatigable exertions." 



THE PROVINCE OF SHROPSHIRE. 25 



of such resentment would inevitably have resulted in his 
dismissal from OiSce. His principles were too deeply rooted to 
allow of his making any modifications in what he conceived to 
be the right mode of conducting the business of the Craft, so 
that the only alternative open to him was retirement. He 
became a Subscribing Member of the Salopian Lodge in 1794, 
and in December of the same year letters were read in that 
Lodge from both Egerton and himself. These letters had 
probably reference to the dispute between them, but no certainty 
on the point is possible, and, so far as I know, this is the last 
occasion on which Shirreff's name is mentioned in any record 
of the Craft in the Province. We can only suppose that the 
deposed Deputy went into voluntary exile, unwilling to be ruled 
where once he had been practically supreme, and lived in solitude, 
pouring forth gloomy prognostications for the future of Masonry. 
If he was spared for a few years longer by his joint enemies the 
rheumatism and " Esquire Gout," he must have seen the extinc- 
tion of the Wrekin Lodge at Wellington in 1798, and of the two 
Whitchurch Lodges almost immediately afterwards, and mourned 
over the obliteration of these monuments of his Masonic career. 
The very fact of their premature decay speaks eloquently of the 
loss his absence had entailed upon them, and must have done 
much to soothe his ruffled vanity, by confirming his opinion of 
his own importance. 

The two Whitchurch Lodges, 348 and 445, the Wynnstay 
Lodge, 548, and the Lodge at Newcastle, in Stafford, 523, referred 
to in Shirreff's letters, were all erased from the roll of Lodges for 
refusing or neglecting to contribute to the Liquidation Fund 
levied by Grand Lodge for the purpose of paying off the large 
debt incurred in building and making alterations to the Free- 
mason's Hall, in London. We may safely assume that if Shirreff 
had still been a ruling spirit in these Lodges his knowledge of 
the power of Grand Lodge, and of the results likely to follow 
from gross disobedience to its orders, would have prevented such 
refusal or neglect being persisted in. 



26 



FREEMASONRY IN 



It may not be out of place if I here attempt briefly to 
sketch the character of the maa who was, as I have said, mainly 
responsible for the revival of Masonry in Shropshire. As his 
letters give us nearly all the information we possess about that 
interesting event, so also do they contain all our knowledge of 
the man ; yet in them I believe he has unconsciously, and yet 
unmistakeably, revealed to us his own personality. As I read 
that revelation, he seems to have been earnest, painstaking, inde- 
fatigable ; not devoid of a certain dry sense of humour ; inclined 
rather to magnify his own ofiice, and fully self-conscious of his 
own dignity and of the value of his own services. A certain 
amount of intolerance for the opinions of others and of hastiness 
of temper seems to have entered into his composition. Somewhat 
of a Martinet too we guess him to have been, a consequence 
probably of his early military training ; but in the main he must 
be acknowledged to have been a true and good Mason, and his 
name should be carefully and gratefully remembered by Shrop- 
shire Lodges. He was not the man, having once put his hand to 
the plough, to look back. Having laid the foundations of his 
work securely, he spared no efibrt to ensure that the building to 
arise thereon should be a worthy one. Four Lodges, as I have 
been able to show, directly owed their constitution to his efforts, (i) 
and though of these 262 has alone escaped the vicissitudes of 
time, and prolonged its existence down to the present day, yet 
he must nevertheless be credited with having widely diSiised the 
principles of the Order through the County, and paved the way 
for the success it attained about the middle of the present cen- 
tury. That his immediate personal success was not greater, and 
the results of his work more striking, I attribute solely to the 
fact that his tenure of Office was short. His retirement from the 
post of D.P.G.M. in 1795 caused the abandonment of much of 
the good work he had begun to do, and had looked forward to 
finishing. Had he retained Office for a few years longer I 
believe he would have reaped the fruit of the seed he had sowed 
so industriously, and rejoiced over the foundation of Lodges ia all 

(1) 1 Wliitohurch No. 1.— (2; Salopian.— (3) Whitchurch No. 2 —(4) Wrekin. 



THE PROVINCE OP SHROPSHIRE. 27 

our chief Shropshire Towns. The impetus his efforts had given 
to Masonic Work continued even after his retirement, and the 
establishment of the Lodge of Industry in Bridgnorth in 1799, 
and of the Mercian Lodge in Ludlow in 1805, may in many ways 
be regarded as the result of his endeavour "to Spread the Light." 

Turning from the Deputy to the P.G.M., we find that 
Egerton is given in the Freemasons Calendar as having held 
office from 1786 to 1819. He may be considered as the first 
real Provincial Grand Master of Shropshire, and did really 
attend for some years to the duties of his office, though not, in 
my opinion, for quite so long a period as he is credited with in 
the Calendar. He w£is, as we have seen, son of the then Bishop 
of Durham, and also Provincial Grand Master of the Counties of 
Stafford, Flint, Denbigh, and Montgomery. In the year 1786 
he also applied for the post of P.G.M. of the County of Durham. 
He seems to have regarded his application as certain of success, 
as in his letter he suggests the method in which his Patent was 
to be drawn up. In spite of his confidence, however, the post 
was in the following year bestowed elsewhere. From this letter 
we also learn that he was " Prebendary of the Fourth Stall in 
the Cathedral of Durham, Domestic Chaplain to John by Divine 
Providence Lord Bishop of Durham, and Rector of Whitchurch, 
Shropshire, cum Marybury " ; he was also entitled to write the 
letters M.A. and F.R.S. after his name. He attended Grand 
Lodge more than once. 

It is not a very easy question to decide whether or not 
Egerton was ever at the head of a real Provincial Grand Lodge 
of Shropshire. In the first place it may be noticed that though 
Shirreff in his fifth letter speaks of the method of conducting 
P.G. Lodges, and asks for information thereon from the Grand 
Secretary, yet but one of his subsequent letters contains any 
reference to the subject, and this expressly states that in the 
year it was written (1793) there was no P.G. Lodge. Again, it 
is evident from a study of the carefully kept Treasurer's accounts 



28 FREEMASONRY IN 



of the Salopian Lodge, that no fees were ever paid by that Lodge 
to a Provincial Grand Lodge until late in the present century. 
It is, however, unwise to judge past days by the light of present 
customs, and the absence of the payment of any such fees is far 
from being conclusive evidence of the non-existence of a P.G. 
Lodge. 

The only Officers of Provincial rank that I can trace 
before the year" 1819 are (1)— the P.G.M. ; (2)— the D.P.G.M. ; 
and (3)— Bro. John Collier P.G. Chaplain. The duties of P.G. 
Secretary were evidently discharged by Major Shirreff when 
D.P.G.M., but after 1795 both these posts filled by him remained 
vacant. It is exceedingly improbable that other Provincial 
Officers could have existed without their names and respective 
ranks appearing in the Minute books of the Salopian Lodge. The 
only occasions between 1788 and 1819 on which Provincial 
Grand Lodges or anything of their nature were held, were at 
Whitchurch on the Festival of St. John the Baptist in 1789, and 
at Shrewsbury on the same Festival in the following year. 
Apart from Shirreff's statement in 1793 that there was then no 
P.G. Lodge in existence, it is quite evident from his letters, and 
from the Minute books of the Salopian Lodge, that attendance 
on these occasions was regarded as a celebration of a festival, and 
as a mark of respect to the D.P.G.M., and not as a participation 
in Provincial Grand Lodge proceedings. The advertisement of 
the festival in 1790, contained in the Shrewsbury Chronicle for 
August 20th in that year, also shows that the only business 
intended to be done was to walk in procession to Church, hear a 
sermon by the P.G. Chaplain, and then dine together. It seems 
therefore perfectly certain that no Provincial Grand Lodge ever 
existed under the presidency of Egerton, yet the fact remains 
that the words " P.G. Lodge " occasionally occur in the minutes of 
the Salopian Lodge, and some explanation of this difficulty seems 
necessary. For instance, what is the meaning of a minute dated 
the 1st Deer., 1795, which records the name of " John Hill, 
Esqre., M.P., Provl. G. Lodge" as a Visitor 2 I believe that the 



THE PEOVINCE OF SHEOPSHIRE. 29 

difficulty can be solved by a comparison of the account given by 
the Secretary of the Salopian Lodge of the Festival in 1790, with 
the account of the same event contained in the Shrewsbury 
Chronicle of the 3rd Septr. in that year. 

The Lodge Secretary gives the names of the Lodges 
represented on that occasion as (1) Whitchurch, (2) Salopian, 
(3) Egerton, and (4) Wrekin — the Chronicle on the other hand 
gives the following list (1) Provincial, (2) Egerton, (3) Salopian, 
and (4) Wellington. In order to make these lists correspond, as 
the Wrekin was the Wellington Lodge, the Whitchurch and 
Provincial Lodges must be considered as identical. I believe 
that in popular estimation they then were so. The P.G.M. and 
his Deputy chiefly attended the Whitchurch Lodge No. 1, and 
their presence caused this Lodge to be regarded as the centre of 
Masonry in the Province. Such was clearly Shirreff's opinion 
when in his first letter he speaks of the dependence of the 
Egerton Lodge (Whitchurch No. 2) on his own Lodge (Whit- 
church No. 1). It is no wonder then that it was sometimes 
inaccurately called the P.G. Lodge, by those who spoke or wrote 
ignorantly or unthinkingly. John Hill, M.P. was, we know. 
Master of the Egerton Lodge in the year 1790, though not 
registered in Grand Lodge as a member of that Lodge, but, as I 
believe, he was the same person as John Hill stated in Shirreff's 
12th letter to have been initiated by him in the Whitchurch 
No. 1 Lodge, I conclude he was also a member of the senior Lodge, 
and so the entry of his name in the manner under consideration is 
explained. Similarly, "Bro. John Collier, Pro. G. Chaplain," 
was merely the Chaplain of the Whitchurch Lodge No. 1. 

Though I have been forced to the conclusion that at this 
period there was no Provincial Grand Lodge of Shropshire, yet 
it is evident that there was at first a careful personal supervision 
of the Lodges by the D.P.G.M, which continued until the dispute 
in 1795 ; and the P.G.M., apart from Shirreff's letters, can be 
shown, by the minutes of the Salopian Lodge, to have granted 
Dispensations, remitted fees to Grand Lodge, and generally to 



30 FREEMASONRY IN 



have interested himself in the proper discharge of his duties. 
But this unhappy quarrel entirely changed the aspect of affairs. 
After the beginning of 1795 the Salopian Lodge began to consult 
Grand Lodge directly, and Communications from Grand Lodge 
previously sent through the D.P.G.M., were now sent straight to 
the private Lodges. Egerton no longer seems to have taken much 
interest in the Province, his absences from Shropshire referred to 
in Shirreff's letters became more frequent, until at last they were 
continuous. A dispensation for the initiation of Henry Bowdler 
in the Salopian Lodge in 1798, and an application to Grand 
Lodge in 1800 for relief for a poor member of the Egerton Lodge, 
are the last pieces of Masonic work I can place to his credit. 
From the former year I believe the Province was practically 
without a head, the immediate consequence being, as already 
noticed, the extinction of three out of the four existing Lodges. 

Prom 1798 to 1817 Egerton's name does not appear in the 
books of the Salopian Lodge. On Deer. 29th in the latter year 
it is recorded that a proposal was made " that the Secretary 
write to Grand Lodge, and request that a Provincial Grand 
Master be appointed instead of the Revd. P. H. Egerton, who 
has been absent many years." 

It is, perhaps, worth noting, that the ceremony of laying 
the first stone of the Column, erected in honour of Lord HiU, in 
1814, was carried out entirely by the Salopian Lodge, and it is 
most improbable that this, the greatest Masonic ceremony ever 
performed in this County, would have been left in the hands of 
a private Lodge, if a Provincial Grand Lodge had been in working 
order, or if a P.G.M. had been anywhere available. 

A further proof, though I think one is hardly needed, of 
the absence of all Provincial authority at this period, will be 
found in the fact that, in the year 1817, the Minute books of the 
Salopian Lodge of Charity, now 117, were evidently sent direct 
to Grand Lodge for inspection, as notes appear at the bottom of 
many pages signed "Edward Harper, Grand Secretary," giving 



THE PROVINCE OF SHEOPSHIEE. 31 



directions for the future avoidance of irregularities there detected. 
I, therefore, conclude that for the last 20 years of his tenure of 
office as indicated by the Calendar, Egerton was a nominal and 
not an active P.G. Master. The extent of his work is sufficiently 
indicated by what has been already said ; of his personality we 
know nothing, as his letters are for the most part colourless and 
devoid of character. 

Before I notice the appointment of the next Provincial 
Grand Master, it may be well to review the strength of the Craft 
in the Province between the years 1795 and 1815, especially as 
neither Egerton nor his Deputy seem to have had any direct 
influence on its retrogression and subsequent progression during 
that period. In 1795 there were four Lodges in Shropshire. 
These were (1) Salopian, (2) "Whitchurch, No. 1, (3) Egerton, 
Whitchurch, No. 2, (4) Wrekin, WeUington. In the year 1798 
the last named Lodge became extinct, but in the following year 
the Lodge of Industry, Bridgnorth, was founded. In 1801, as 
we have already seen, the two Whitchurch Lodges were erased, 
and only two Lodges remained in the whole County. To these, 
in the year 1805, the Mercian Lodge, Ludlow, was added, and, 
in 1815, the number was further increased to four when the 
Salopian Lodge of Charity, 117, after its many wanderings as a 
Military Lodge, settled down in Shrewsbury. I do not now pro- 
pose to break the continuity of my narrative by stating what is 
known about any of these Lodges. It will suffice if I here indi- 
cate where that information will be found. The history of the 
two Shrewsbury Lodges will be found in the pages allotted there- 
to respectively in a subsequent part of this work, that of the 
Lodge of Industry, Bridgnorth, and of the Agenorian Chapter 
that worked with it, is noticed in connection with the present 
Bridgnorth Lodge, The Castle, 1621 ; that of the Mercian Lodge 
in connection with the Lodge of the Marches, Ludlow, 611. Of 
the two Whitchurch Lodges I know nothing further than is 
stated in the previous pages, (i) 

(1) The names of their respective members, as refjistered in Grand Lodge, will be found 
with the history of the Lodge of St. Alkmund, 2311, hereafter given. 



32 FREEMASONRY IN 



The four Lodges whicli were active in the year 1815 con- 
tinued working until after the death of the Provincial Grand 
Master next appointed. This was the Hon. Henry Grey Bennett, 
who probably owed his appointment, which, according to the 
Calendar, dates from 1819, to the fact that he was M.P. for 
Shrewsbury. He represented the Borough in 1806, lost his seat 
in 1807, and was again elected in 1811, 1812, 1819, and 1820. 
He did not contest the seat in the year 1826, and as his tenure 
of Office as P.G.M. seems to have ceased in that year, I conclude 
that he died about this period. The Minute book of the Salopian 
Lodge for the year 1824 clearly shows that he was not installed 
in Office before 1825, and I believe this ceremony was in fact 
never performed. The only occasions upon which, so far as I 
know, he performed any of the duties of his high station were in 
1820, when he presented an address to King George IV. from the 
Salopian Lodge, and in the same year when he granted a dispen- 
sation for the initiation of Sir A. V. Corbet, Bart., in the same 
Lodge. No formal mention is made of a Provincial Grand Lodge, 
or of Provincial Grand Officers, during his term of Office. There 
is, however, a letter, in other respects valueless, preserved by 
chance amongst the debris of papers accumulated by successive 
Secretaries of 262, which is worthy of notice. It is dated Decem- 
ber 11th, 1842, and was written by Bro. Sir A. V. Corbet to Bro. 
S. Wood. After accepting an invitation, the writer signs himself 
as " A. V. Corbet, D.P.G.M." Por whom he was Deputy, or 
when he was appointed to that Office, I cannot say, but as there 
was no P.G.M. from the year 1826 to 1852, it seems evident that 
he must have been appointed by Bennett before 1826, and still 
continued to use the title when it had lost all meaning by the 
death or resignation of the P.G.M. in that year. 

After 1826 the Province remained for a quarter of a cen- 
tury without even a nominal head. This, in my opinion, was due 
entirely to the remissness of the Grand Lodge Officials, as the 
Lodges in the Province seem to have been quite alive to the dis- 
advantages entaUed upon them by the non-appointment of a P.G.M. 



THE PROVINCE OP SHROPSHIRE. 33 

In October, 1827, the Salopian Lodge determined to present a 
petition on the subject to Grand Lodge, and though no trace of 
it can be found in Freemason's Hall, it was, nevertheless, I 
believe, forwarded in due course.!') In the following year the 
same Lodge again considered the subject, and caused letters to 
be written to the other Lodges in the County asking for their 
co-operation in an attempt to get the vacant post filled up. The 
co-operation of the Mercian Lodge could not have been obtained, 
as it became extinct in this very year, having displayed no vitality 
for a considerable period. Whether the other Lodges in the Prov- 
ince acted in the matter or not, it is clear that the attempt met with 
no success, and as about this period the Salopian Lodge reached the 
least flourishing part of its existence, we find no further mention 
of the subject until 1840. In September of that year the Anchor 
of Hope Lodge, Woore, No. 644, founded in 1836, with the 
enthusiasm commonly found in young Lodges, started an agita- 
tion with the same object in view, but without result. In May, 
1843, a deputation was sent by the Salopian Lodge to Bro. Sir 
Andrew Vincent Corbet, Bart., soliciting him to accept the office 
which had been so long vacant. At first he seems to have been 
disposed to accept the invitation of his Mother Lodge, but ulti- 
mately changed his mind, and, even after he had been actually 
appointed by the G.M., returned his patent and declined to act. 
On the 1 1th of November a letter to the Salopian Lodge was 
written by him giving amongst other reasons for his change of 
intention his inability to undertake the expenses attending the 
office. It will thus be readily acknowledged that his name 
should not be included, as it is, in the list of the P.G. Masters 
of Shropshire contained in the Freemasons' Calendar. 

No further notice of the subject is taken by the Secretary 
of 262 until the 13th December, 1847, upon which date we find 
the following minute: — "Proposed by Bro. Onions that the W.M. 
of the Lodge do communicate with the other two Lodges in this 
County to request their co-operation in applying to Grand Lodge 
to have a Provincial Grand Lodge established for this County, 
which was seconded by Bro. John Carline, and the same to be 

(1) Bro. Sadler, who very kindly made the requisite searches for me, suggests that the 
petition was probably forwarded from Grand Lodge to the Grand Master, and was 
never returned by him, B 



34 FREEMASONRY IN 



placed under the care of the Grand Registrar of England, (i) 
which was carried unanimously." This effort was also doomed to 
failure like many that pre.ceeded it. The entry is, however, 
interesting from the reference to " the other two Lodges in the 
County," clearly implying that Shropshire then contained but 
three Lodges in all. One of "the other two Lodges " was clearly 
the Salopian of Charity, 117, but the second is not so easily iden- 
tified. Three other Lodges in the County had in this year a 
nominal existence, viz., The Lodge of Industry, Bridgnorth ; the 
Anchor and Hope Lodge, Woore ; and the Roden Lodge, Wem, 
which latter Lodge had been founded in the previous year. Of 
these the two former were not formally erased from the list untU 
1853, but as no names of members were registered in Grand 
Lodge after 1840, I conclude that in 1847 they were practically 
extinct. Grand Lodge does not contain any record of the work 
of the Roden Lodge, if any in fact took place, and the only pay- 
ment ever made on its behalf was for founders fees ; still as it 
started in 1846, and for some little time sent visitors to 262, it 
may be assumed that this was the other Lodge referred to in the 
above minute. 

Another interval of more than three years elapsed before 
we find the Lodges again stirring in the matter. On the 10th 
Febry., 1851, a written communication was ordered to be sent to 
Sir Watkin Williams Wynn for the purpose of ascertaining 
whether he would accept the oflB.ce of P.G.M. for this County. 
On the 8th Deer., Sir Watkin gave an intimation through Bro. 
Dymock that he would gladly do so. The appointment was 
accordingly made in due course by the Grand Master the Earl of 
Zetland, who however thought it right to join North Wales and 
Shropshire into one Province. Erom what has been already said 
it will I think be clear that there were only two real Lodges at 
this time in Shropshire (262 and 117), and as North Wales only 
possessed a like number, (2) the duties of the post were not at 
first more than could be reasonably managed in one Province. 

(1) Alexander Dobie (1816—1857.) 

(2) St. David's, Bangor, then 640, now 3S1 ; founded 1827. 

St. Cybi, Holyhead, then Hibernia 869, now 597, founded 1831. 



THE PROVINCE OF SHBOPSHIEE. 35 

With the advent of the year 1852 closes one of the 
darkest decades in the history of Shropshire Masonry. The two 
Shrewsbury Lodges alone continued to work throughout the 
period, and nothing but the illegality of the attempt prevented 
the existence of the Salopian Lodge of Charity being merged in 
that of the Salopian Lodge. The two Lodges had actually 
amalgamated under the "Warrant of the latter Lodge in 1851, but 
were obliged by the regulations of the order to separate again, or 
return the Warrant of 117 to Grand Lodge. The separation was 
accordingly promptly effected, and the lapse of time has shown 
the wisdom of that course. Shrewsbury affords an ample field 
for the operations of both Lodges'. But one sign of vitality 
appears during the period of which I am writing, namely the 
foundation, in the year 1843, of the Salopian Chapter, 262, but 
of this subject I will take no further notice now, a separate page 
being hereafter devoted to its consideration, (i) 

The installation of Sir Watkin took place on the 9th of 
March, 1852, in the Lodge room at the Lion Hotel, Shrewsbury. 
The event had for some time been looked forward to with great 
delight and interest by the Craft generally in the Province, and 
the ceremony was numerously attended. The Installing Master 
was Bro. The Right HonWe. Lord Combermere, the Hero of 
Bhurtpore, and R.W.P.G.M. for Chester, who was specially 
deputed by the Grand Master to perform the Ceremony. 

After the Installation, addresses from both the Shropshire 
and Welsh Lodges were presented to the R.W.P.G.M. That 
presented by the former begins : — • 

Right Worshipful Sir and Brother, 

"We the Brethren of the Salopian Lodges Nos. 135 
(nosv 117), 328 (now 262), 398 (Bridgnorth), 644 (Woore), and 
765 (Wem), offer our sincere congratulations on your elevation 
to the distinguished position you now occupy, &c., &c." 

(1) See under title " The Salopian Chapter," and o£ Salopian Lodge History for 
the year 1843. 



36 FREEMASONRY IN 



A study of the signatures appended to this address shows 
that not a single member of the Bridgnorth or Woore Lodges 
signed his name ; and only two belonging to the Wem Lodge 
did so. This bears out my assumption that these lodges had then 
ceased working. One of the two signatures from Wem is that of 
John Bishton Minor, P.M., 765 ; in the Minute book of 262, on 
the 23rd Deer., 1846, we find that Charles Fred Barker, a visitor, 
was described as W.M. of the Roden Lodge 765 ; it therefore 
seems that the Lodge must have prolonged an active existence 
for some little time, as it had at all events two Masters. 

Returning to the subject of this address, it may be 
noticed that many signatures thereto are followed by the number 
875, being that of the St. John's Lodge, Wellington, a Lodge 
not then in existence. This was rendered possible as the 
engrossment of the address was not ready for presentation on the 
Installation day, and was not in fact delivered until after the 
Consecration of this Lodge, which will be shortly noticed. 

The first D.P.G.M. of the new Province, was Bro. the 
the Revd. E. H. Dymock ; the first P.G. Secretary Bro. Cheis. 
Wigan, of Ruabon ; and the first P.G. Treasurer, Bro. J. P. 
White. The last named brother continued to hold the same 
office until the separation of the Province in 1885, and was with 
the exception of Bro. H. T. Wace, then appointed P.G.S. of W., 
and Bro. J. W. Towers, then appointed P.G. P., the only one of 
the 16 Provincial Grand Officers appointed in 1852 who lived to 
see that event. Bro. Wace is now the sole survivor. Of these 15 
officers, 10 were members of the Salopian Lodge. 

On the 17th May, 1852, the Provincial Grand Officers 
journeyed to Admaston to consecrate the St. John's Lodge, but 
as the Warrant did not arrive in time, the Ceremony had to be 
postponed until June 16th, upon which day it was duly performed. 
Bro. J. W. Towers is stated in the Provincial Minute book to 
have been the Master installed upon this occasion. Bro. Towers 
lived until the present year (1891), and died deeply regretted by 



THE PEOVINCE OF SHROPSHIRE. 37 

all who knew him. The brethren .signalised the first visit of the 
R.W.P.G.M. to their Lodge by meeting him at the Station and 
conducting him in procession to the Lodge Room. It is evident 
from the Minute books of 262 that the officers of the St. John's 
Lodge had prepared themselves for office by constantly attending 
the meetings of the former Lodge, of which they were nearly all 
members. The number was changed from 875 to 601 in 1863. 

The next Lodge placed on the roll of the Province was 
the Lodge of the Marches, Ludlow, 887, which became 611 in 
1863. The date of this ceremony was the 13th July, 1853. The 
Consecrating Officer was the "W.P. Grand Chaplain, Bro. Guise, 
and the Master installed was Bro. Bach. 

On the 26th October in the same year a proposal was 
made, in a P.G. Lodge held at Shrewsbury, by Bro. H. T. Wace, 
that a subscription should be raised for erecting Almshouses for 
decayed Masons or their widows ; it was, however, ultimately 
allowed to drop. On the same day Bro. Sir. A. V. Corbet, Bart., 
was appointed P.G.S.W., but he only held office for one year; 
the rest of the Provincial Grand Officers then appointed remained 
in office for two years, <i' a custom always maintained until recent 
times. 

On August 8th, 1854, the Segontium Lodge, Carnarvon, 
881 (now 606) was consecrated, and in the following year, the 
Charter for the Eyton Chapter, working in connection with the 
Lodge of St. John, Wellington, was granted. 

On May 23rd, 1857, a return was asked for by Grand 
Lodge of the number of P.G. Lodges held in each Province 
during the past ten years, specifying those in which the P.G.M. 
presided in person. The answer of the P.G. Sec?- for Shropshire 
is worth recording — "That the R.W.P.G.M. was installed on the 
9th of March, 1852, since which he had held five P.G. Lodges, 
and that he had presided in each and every of them, viz. : — 
(1) Certain exceptions occur through deaths from time to time. 



38 PEEEJUSONEY IN 



6th September, 1852, at Bangor. 
26th October, 1853, at Shrewsbury. 
8th August, 1854, at Carnarvon. 
28th August, 1855, at Admaston. 
• 6th August, 1856, at Holyhead." 

This return did not contain the three P.G. Lodges held for the 
purpose of consecrating Craft Lodges, at all of which the 
R.W.P.G.M. was present. 

In 1857 the Lodge of St. John was removed from 
Admaston to WelHngton. 

The P.G. Lodge minute book contains no record of the 
Consecration of the Lodge of St. Tudno, Llandudno, 755, which 
seems to have taken place on July 23rd, 1858. 

The R. W. the Grand Secretary of England, Brother 
Wm- Henry White, on JanT- 14th, 1861, presented to the Pro- 
vincial Grand Lodge of North Wales and Shropshire, a 
magnificent sword. This gift was most gratefully accepted, and 
a special minute of acknowledgment was made by order of the 
R.W.P.G.M. Bro. J. P. White, the Pro. G. Treas. was nephew 
to Bro. W°i- Sj- White, and presented the sword in the name of 
his Uncle. The sword has two plates upon with engraved 
inscriptions. The larger of these records the gift to the Province 
as above mentioned, the other, which is very much worn, reads 

thus : — 

Royal Arch 

Constitutional 

Sols 

The Constitutional Sols were a secret convivial Society, 
in no respect Masonic, established about the year 1780. 

On Jan. 13th, 1862, a special meeting of the P.G. Lodge 
was held in Shrewsbury for the purpose of proposing an Address 
of Condolence with Her Majesty the Queen on the occasion of 
the lamented death of H.R.H. The Prince Consort. This 



THE PROVINCE OF SHROPSHIRE. 39 

meeting was numerously attended, and a loyal and affectionate 
address was prepared, and subsequently presented. 

On Feb. 25th, 1864, Sir Watkin held a P.G. Lodge at 
"Wynnstay to commemorate the rebuilding of his mansion. On 
this occasion invitations were issued to every subscribing member 
of the Lodges in the Province, and a large party assembled, and 
were entertained in a princely manner. 'i) 

The Welshpool Lodge, The Royal Oak, 998, was consecrated 
on March 31st of the same year, Bro. Goldsboro being the first W.M. 

In the following year the P.G. Lodge, under the direction 
of the R.W.P.G.M., assisted at the ceremony of laying the corner 
stone of Ti'inity Church, Llandudno. 

In the year 1866 three Lodges were consecrated, viz. : — 
The Anglesea Lodge, Llangefni, 1113; The Lodge of St. Oswald, 
Oswestry, 1124; and the Lodge of St. Milburga, Ironbridge, 
1120. In the same year the Segontium Lodge, Carnarvon, was 
ordered to be erased by the Board of General Purposes, for not 
forwarding its returns since 1863. This Lodge is still on the 
roll, although no notice is taken in the P.G. Lodge proceedings 
of pardon for its offence being granted. 

On the 24th of October, 1867, The Royal Denbigh Lodge, 
Denbigh, 1143, was consecrated, and on the following day the 
Freemasons' Hall, at Llandudno, was formerly opened by the 
R.W.P.G.M. attended by his Officers. 

The Provincial Grand Lodge held at Wellington, on the 
24th of April, 1868, was the first not presided over in person by 
Sir Watkin since he assumed office in 1852. He was then in 
attendance upon H.R.H. The Prince of Wales, at Carnarvon 
Castle, and so could not attend to his Masonic duties. At this 
Lodge Provincial Grand Lodge jewels were voted to Bro. J. P. 
White, P.G., Treas'-- and Bro. Charles Wigan, P.G., Sec'y. for 
their long and valuable services. 

(1) See History of The Salopian Lodge for 1864, 



40 



FREEMASONRY IN 



On Nov. 1st, 1869, the R.W.P.G.M. laid the Foundation 
Stone of the Oswestry Cottage Hospital, under the banner of the 
Lodge of St. Oswald, 1124, under the history of which Lodge 
further particulars of this interesting event are given. 

The Square and Compass Lodge, Wrexham, 1336, was 
duly consecrated on the 14th of March, 1871 ; the P.G. Officers 
on this occasion were ably assisted by Bro. Willoughby, of 
Birkenhead. A very large number of Brethren from the neigh- 
bouring Provinces attended the Ceremony, during which Bro. 
John Lewis was installed Master of the Lodge. He set to work 
in real earnest, as on the 30 th of May a dispensation for 
initiating nine candidates in one evening had to be procured. 

The first meeting of the Bala Lodge, 1369, was held under 
dispensation early in January, 1872 ; a further dispensation was 
granted on the 6th of Feb'T-- to enable the W.M. to initiate 12 
candidates in one evening ; and on the 3rd of May the Lodge 
was properly consecrated. 

Hitherto it had been usual to hold aU Provincial Grand 
Lodges in Craft Lodges, which were duly opened by their own 
officers before the arrival of the R.W.P.G.M. and his officers. 
About this time, however, I believe. Sir Watkin, acting on the 
principle that the less cannot contain the greater, began to hold 
his Provincial Grand Lodge quite separate and distinct from 
Craft Lodges, in the manner to which we are now accustomed. 

The handsome donation of 50 guineas was in 1873 voted 
by the P.G. Lodge to each of the three great Masonic Charities. 
In June of the same year, at a Provincial Grand Lodge of 
Emergency, The Fitzalan Lodge, Oswestry, 1432, was consecrated. 
Bro. W. J. Wallace, the W.M. elect, was duly installed by Bro. 
T. W. J. Goldsboro, P.P.G.S.W. In this year also Bro. W. H. 
SpauU, P.A.G.D. of C. was appointed P.G.S., and has continued 
ever since to discharge the onerous duties of that office in the 
most able and energetic manner. It is to his kindness and 
courtesy that I owe my ability to present these extracts from the 
Provincial Grand Lodge Books since the year 1852. 



THE PROVINCE OF SHEOPSHIRE. 41 

Shortly afterwards, Bro. Dymock, who had been D.P.G.M, 
for over 20 years, resigned that ofl&ce on account of ill-health, 
and in the following year Bro. J. R. Ormsby Gore (afterwards 
Lord Harlech) P.M. 1124, was appointed to the post thus left 
vacant. 

The next Lodge placed on the roll of the Province was the 
Sir Watkin, Mold, 1477. Its foundation had been under dis- 
cussion for many years, and was at last happily consummated on 
the 26th Feb''?-- 1874. Bro. Goldsboro again acted as Consecra- 
ting Officer, and Bro. Piatt, P.P.G.S.W. Cheshire, installed 
Bro. Salmon, P.M., 425, the W.M. elect. 

The St. Eleth Lodge, Amlwch, 1488, and the Madoc Lodge, 
Portmadoc, 1509, were also consecrated in this year; Bro. Golds- 
boro in each case performing the Ceremony. In this year, too, the 
by-laws of the Province were revised, and the Charitable 
Association founded. 

Four lodges were added to the strength of the Province in 
1876 ; these were the Llanidloes Lodge, 1582 ; the Cedewain 
Lodge, Newtown, 1594 ; the Castle Lodge, Bridgnorth, 1621 ; 
and the Clive Lodge, Market Drayton, 1575. The R.W.P.G.M. 
was present at the consecration of each of these Lodges ; the 
Ceremony in each case being performed by Bro. Goldsboro. It 
may be noticed that though the Clive Lodge had obtained its 
Warrant before any of the other three, its consecration was last 
in point of date. In this year the D.P.G.M. Lord Harlech died, 
and Bro. W. Bulkeley Hughes, M.P., was appointed in his stead. 

On the 3rd August, 1877, The Caradoc Lodge, Rhyl, 
1674, was consecrated by Bro. W. H. Spaull, P.G.S. ; Bro. 
Goldsboro, the officer generally performing that ceremony, having 
died in January. On the 12th Sep*""- following, the P.G. Lodge 
voted £50 to the Indian Famine Relief Fund, and on the same 
day the Corbet Lodge, Towyn, 1583, was consecrated by 
Bro. Spaull. r 



42 



FREEMASONRY IN 



In this year (1877) Sir Watkin completed a period of 25 
years rule over the Province, and to commemorate this event he 
was presented with an address bound in an illuminated album. 
A presentation for this Province to the Royal Masonic Institu- 
tion for Boys, at Wood Green, was also arranged to be purchased 
by subscription, and called the " Sir Watkin Presentation." The 
subscription reached the handsome sum of £589 lis. 9d. At the 
same time, the sum of 100 guineas was paid out of the P.G. 
Lodge funds to make the P.G.M. a Vice Patron in perpetuity of 
the same Institution ; £50 was also voted to the Girls School, 
and a similar sum to the Goldsboro Memorial. 

The "Sir Watkin Presentation," purchased for 500 guineas, 
gave the R.W.P.G.M. for North Wales and Shropshire the right 
from time to time, during the lifetime of H.R.H. the Princess 
Beatrice, to nominate one boy to the Institution, whenever a 
vacancy should occur, and in order to perpetuate this right, a 
policy on the life of H.R.H. for £525 was taken out, the 
premiums on which are still paid by the Province of North Wales, 
as will be seen hereafter. 

In 1880 the Province voted 30 guineas towards the 
purchase of a Bishop's Throne for the newly restored Cathedral 
in Bangor, in which town the Royal Leek Lodge, 1849, was con- 
secrated shortly afterwards. This year, too, saw the commence- 
ment of the present custom of an annual instead of a biennial 
appointment of Provincial Grand Officers. 

The Audley Lodge, Newport, 1876, was consecrated by 
the R.W.P.G.M. assisted by Bro. W. H. Spaull, on 20th May, 
1881. In 1882, the D.P.G.M., Bro. Bulkeley Hughes, died, and 
our present R.W.P.G.M., Sir Offley Wakeman, Bart., was 
appointed in his stead to the vacant office ; the Province also by 
a second donation of 50 guineas completed the Vice Patronage 
of the Girls' School ; and the Masonic Hall at Bangor was dedi- 
cated. The Mawddach Lodge, Barmouth, 1988, was consecrated 
by the D.P.G.M. on the 6th March, 1883; Sir Watkin was 



THE PROVINCE OF SHliOPSIIIUE. 43 

unable through serious illness to be present, but was sufficiently 
recovered to atted the P.G. Lodge held at Ludlow in June. The 
Barmouth Lodge was the last established in the old joint Province. 



On August the 23rd, 1883, the W.D.P.G.M., Sir Offley 
Wakeman, Bart., attended by the P.G. Officers, went to Wynnstay 
and presented a Turquoise and Diamond Jewel from the Masons of 
the Province to Miss L. A. Williams Wynn, on the occasion of 
her marriage with Mr. Herbert Lloyd Watkin "Williams Wynn, 
and, in the January following, Sir Offley Wakeman was himself 
presented with a handsome clock on the occasion of his own 
marriage. 

On the 9th of March, 1885, Sir Watkin died, an event 
deeply regretted by all who had the pleasure of knowing him 
personally, or the honour of working under him Masonically. 
His death is too recent to render any attemjft at eulogising his 
work necessary ; his merits are known to and appreciated by a far 
wider circle than I expect to reach in writing this sketch. Yet 
this much I must say, that to him mainly is due the wonderful 
progress made by the Craft in the Province during the past forty 
years. His high social station, his uniform kindness, his genial 
disposition, and especially his unwearying industry, influenced all 
around him to respect and honour the Brotherhood of which he 
was so bright an ornament, and stimulated his Brethren in the 
Craft to renewed activity in upholding the true principles of 
their profession, and in extending the sphere of its operations. 
He was descended from a Masonic family ; his grandfather was 
Grand Warden in the years 1770 and 1771, and acted as 
President of the Board of Grand Stewards in the former year. 
He was initiated in the Province of Cheshire, and was W.M. of 
the Cestrian Lodge, 425, in the year 1851. This Lodge then 
counted amongst its active members many distinguished men, 
including — Lord Combermere, Lord Chief Justice Jervis, and 
Mr. Welsby, Recorder of Chester. He joined the Salopian 
Lodge, 262, in the year 1852, and was exalted on April ith, 



41 FREEMASONRY IN 



1853, in the Chapter connected with what was then the Lodge 
of Fidelity of Birkenhead, 701. In 1859 he was appointed 
Provincial Grand Superintendent of the joint Province. In all 
respects he worthily upheld the Masonic traditions of his family, 
and leaves behind him a nephew, his successor in his title and 
estates, who has always evinced considerable interest in Masonic 
work, and now holds the rank of P.P.G.W. Twenty-four Lodges 
in all came into existence in the joint Province during his reign, 
eight of these being in Shropshire, and he was, with two excep- 
tions, present at the Consecration of all these Lodges. On the 
tomb of Sir Christopher Wren, ia St. Paul's Cathedral, this 
inscription is placed — " Si queris monumentum, Circumspice " — 
so to my Brother Masons I say that in the prosperity they now 
enjoy, they may trace the work of him that is gone, and find the 
best and most enduring monument to his memory. The great 
extension of the Craft required that on his death the Provinces 
of North Wales and Shropshire should be again separated. This 
was accordingly done, and his name will stand alone to all time 
as the sole P.G.M. of the joint Province. It is fitting that it 
should be so, and that his name alone should be associated with 
the work he himself performed. 

Our present R. W.P.G.M., Sir Offley Wakeman, Bart., was 
instaUed on Oct. 22nd., 1885, by Bro. Colonel Shadwell Gierke, 
G.S., in the Lodge Room, at the Lion Hotel, Shrewsbury, in the 
presence of a large gathering of distinguished Masons. On the 
following day Lord Harlech was installed R.W.P.G.M. of the 
Province of North Wales. 



Bro. Sir Ofiley Wakeman was initiated in the Churchill 
Lodge, 478, in the year 1871, was appointed Provincial Grand 
Secretary of Oxfordshire in 1872, and, in 1878, was elected to fill 
both the chair of W.M. in his Lodge, and that of S.W. in his 
Provincial Grand Lodge. In 1882, as already noticed, he became 
D.P.G.M. of North Wales and Shropshire. 



THE PROVINCE or SHROPSHIEE. 45 



Considerable difficulty was experienced in making an 
equitable division of the assets of the joint Province. Eventually 
the matter was suitably arranged by a Committee appointed for 
the purpose. The right of nominating a boy under the pro- 
visions of the "Sir Watkin Presentation Fund" was to be 
exercised alternately by the new Provinces during the life of the 
Princess Beatrice, and to prevent the perpetuation of such 
alternate nomination, another policy on the life of H.R.H. was 
taken out for an amount equal to that of the existing policy. 
One of these policies will ultimately secure to each Province the 
benefit of a right of nomination of one boy in perpetuity. The 
Patronage of the Institutions for Boys and Girls was divided as 
evenly as possible, regard being had to the number of Lodges in 
each Province. The presentation sword given as before men- 
tioned by Bro. W. H. White, was allotted to Shropshire ; the 
banners of the joint Province and a smaller sword in its 
possession, to North Wales. A gold snuif box,(i) formerly 
presented to Bro. W. H. White by the Duke of Sussex, when 
G.M., and which was then the property of the joint Province, 
was given to Bro. J. P. White in recognition of his long service 
as P.G. Treasurer. The balance of the funds then in hand after 
discharging all liabOities, was presented to the P.G. Secretary, as 
a token of esteem from the brethren for the energy displayed by 
him in promoting the well-being of Masonry in the Province 
during his 13 years of office. 

After the Installation of the R.W.P.G.M., Sir Offley 
Wakeman, he was presented by the D.P.G.M., on behalf of the 
Lodges, with a handsome Album containing the following address, 
with the names of all members of the Lodges appended. 

"To Sir Offley Wakeman, Bart., Right Worshipful 
Provincial Grand Master of the Antient Free and Accepted 
Masons of Shropshire." 

(1) For the ultimate fate of this snufl box, see History of the Salopian Lodge for 
the year 1880. 



46 



FREEMASONRY IN 



" It having pleased the Most Worshipful Grand Master 
to divide the old Province of North Wales and Shropshire, We, 
the members of the Lodges in the new Province of Shropshire, 
beg to express our gratification that the choice of His Royal 
Highness should have fallen upon you as our Provincial Grand 
Master, and we offer you our sincere &,nd fraternal congratulations 
on the auspicious event of to-day, feeling sure that it is but the 
precursor of the increase and good of Freemasonry in your 
province. The zeal you have displayed in pursuing the objects 
of our organization from the period of your initiation into the 
privileges and mysteries of the Craft, we cannot but remember 
with satisfaction ; and we are deeply imbued with the conviction 
that the interests of our truly noble Order will be materially 
advanced under your guidance, while those who are unconnected 
with us by the ties of brotherhood, will be satisfied from the 
position you hold in your native county, that there is nothing in 
our principles inconsistent with true patriotism, active charity> 
pure religion, permanent order, and every social and domestic virtue. 

We pray that the Great Architect of the Universe may 
spare you to govern us for many years, and that the Lodges 
under your rule may flourish and increase." 

Subsequent events have fully justified the language of this 
address, and the prayer with which it closes, may be repeated 
now with equal sincerity. 

Shortly after the Province was estabhshed, we find the 
Brethren attempting to get a Masonic Hall built in Shrewsbury, 
but their efforts only succeeded in adding another to the long 
list of Committees which have from time to time been appointed, 
only to fail, for that object. 

Bro. R. A. Craig, P.M., 262, who was the first to hold the 
office of Standard Bearer in the new Province, presented to the 
Provincial Grand Lodge on his retirement from office, a handsome 
Silk Banner, bearing the Arms of the Province. His kindness 
was suitably acknowledged by the Lodge. 



THE PROVINCE OF SHROPSHIRE. 47 



On January 11th, 1886, The R.W.P.G.M., assisted by 
Bro. W. H. Spaull, P.G., Sectr- and Bro. Warren Thompson, 
consecrated the Brownlow Lodge, Ellfesmere, 2131, upon which 
occasion Bro. E. M. Prevost was installed as W.M. 

In the following year the Provincial Grand Lodge entered 
on its minutes an expression of devoted loyalty to Her Majesty 
the Queen on the occasion of her reaching the Jubilee year of her 
reign. In May of the same year the R.W.P.G.M. presided as 
Chairman at the Festival of the Royal Masonic Institution for 
Girls. On this occasion the Province contributed the sum of 
£1054 18s. Od. to the "A" Fund. 

In March, 1888, Bro. J. P. White was compelled by 
failing health to resign the office of P.G. Treasurer, which he had 
held continuously for 36 years. In the History of his Mother 
Lodge, 262, at a subsequent page, further reference is made to 
the great services rendered by Bro. White to the Craft. 

In the same year it was found that the debt incurred on 
the separation of the old joint Province was too large to be 
liquidated by the surplus income of the new Province, unless 
payment were spread over a great number of years. The Lodges 
were, therefore, invited to contribute, pro rata according to the 
number of their subscribing members, to discharge this liability. 
The sum thus raised placed the finances of the Province once 
more upon a satisfactory footing. 

At a P.G. Lodge held at Ironbridge, on Sep. 18th, 1888, 
Bro. W. H. Spaull was presented a full dress suit of Grand Lodge 
clothing, a case containing an undress suit of the same clothing, 
and a receipt for the fee of honour payable on his appointment 
to the office of Assistant Grand Director of Ceremonies, as a 
mark of the esteem of the Brethren of the Province for the way 
in which he had conducted the business of the Province. 

On June 6th, 1889, the Lodge of St. Alkmund, Whit- 
church, 2311, was consecrated by the R.W.P.G.M., assisted by 



48 FRKEMASONRY IN 



the P.G. Secretary. Since that date no addition to the roll of 
Lodges has been made ; but Shropshire, with its twelve Lodges, 
continues slowly and yet surely to grow in Masonic strength, and 
to do its share in the beneficent work of Charity — the distinguish- 
ing characteristic of the tenets of the Craft. 

In conclusion, I can only express the earnest wish that 
the present prosperity and harmony may long continue, and that 
if any spirit of rivalry be present in our midst, it may only be in 
the eifort to further the principles of Masonry, and to cultivate 
that true fraternal union which gives real strength to all 
Masonic endeavour. 




y|v 



THE PROVINCE OF SHKOPSHIEE. 



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52 FREEMASONRY IN 



LIST OF PROVINCIAL GRAND OFFICERS 

OF THE 

PROVINCE OF SHROPSHIRE. 



Provincial Grand Masters : 

Sir Edward Matthews, 1731 — ? 

Sir Robert de Cornwall, 1754 — 1 

George Durant, 1774 — 1779. 

Hon. & Rev. F. Hy. Egerton (398), 1786—1819 (?1800 circa). 

Hon. Henry Grey Bennett, M.P., 1819—1826. 

Sir W. Watkin Wynn, Bart. (262), 1852—1885. 

Sir Offley Wakeman, Bart. (262), 1885 — . 



Deputy Provincial Grand Masters : 

Major Charles Shirrepf (388-262), 1786—1795. 

Sir Andrew Vincent Corbet, Bart. (262), 1823 (circa) — 1852. 

Rev. E. H. Dymock (262), 1852—1873. 

J. R. Ormsby-Gore (Lord Harlech) (1124), 1874—1876. 

W. Bulkbley Hughes, M.P. (606), 1877—1882. 

Sir Offley Wakeman, Bart. (262), 1882—1885. 

Rowland G. Venables (611-1124), 1885—. 



Provincial Grand Treasurers : 
Joshua Pugh White (262), 1852—1888. 
Vincent Corbet Legu Crump (117), 1888 — . 



Provincial Grand Secretaries : 

Major Charles Shirrefp (388-262), 1786—1795. 
Charles Wigan (425), 1852—1872. 
W. H. Spaull (1124), 1872—. 



THE PROVINCE OF SHROPSHIEE. 



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60 



FHEEMASONEY IN 



Provincial Grand Stewards. 



1852-3. 

B. Churchill, 262 
Isaac Taylor, 262 

1853-4-5. 
W. H. Niccolls, 262 
W. J. Beech, 601 
John Francis, 606 
Wm. Williams, 606 
Wm. Patchett, 262 
Wm. Anslow, 601 

1855-6-7. 
W. H. Bayley, 262 
John Aronson 
Wm. Thomas, 38i 
R. Pritchard 
John Francis, 606 
R. M. Williams, 606 

1857-8-9. 
W. Stokes 
S. Blandford 
John Barker, 601 
Edward Lewis, 1336 
H. A. Jones, 262 
E. Jeffreys 

1859-60-1. 

C. G. Wingfield, 262 
W. B. Hayley, 601 

— Webb 

— Preece 
George Felton 

— Thomas 

1861-2-3. 
W. F. Chapman 
H. E. Sulhvan 

1861-5. 
J. Minor Kilvert, 611 
John Lloyd, 611 
W. T. Middle (Salop) 

1866-7-8. 
George Owen, 1124 
Jasper More, 262 
Thomas B. Brown 
Edward Pryce 
George Brown, 998 



1866-7-8. 
William Thomas 

1868-9-70. 
Richard BeUiss, 601 
Wm. Blakeway, 262 
Edward Pryce 
Arthur Britten, 601 

1871-2-3. 
Thomas Rutter 
Askew Roberts, 1121 
Frederick Cox, 611 

1873-4. 
Ephraim Wood, 1124 
W. Patchett, 262 
H. Newman, 262 

E. C. Peele, 262 
P. H. Evans, 117 

1874-5-6. 
R. T. Phillips, 1488 
Wm. Collender, 1582 
R. J. Sisson, 1143 

B. de la P. Beresford, 1432 
Alfred Marston, 611 

C. H. Rees, 606 

1876-7. 
John Thomas, 1124 

F. Britton, 1594 
W. Low, 1336 
J. Stokes, 1621 

R. T. Phillips, 1488 
E. Andrew, 262 

1878-9. 
J. C. W. Lister, 1120 
J. O. Bury, 1336 
A. McMillan, 384 
John Corbett, 1477 
Wm. Spraggon, 117 
Wm. Burton, 1336-1124 

1879-80. 
H. C. Clarke, 262 
J. Adams, 601 
H. Shepard, 601 
J. S. Davies, 998 
J. Treweek, 1488 



THE PROVINCE OF SHROPSHIRE. 



61 



Provincial Grand Stewards. 



1880-1. 
John Davies, 1143 
Donald Cameron, 384 
W. J. Morris, 1509 
E. Smith, 1336 

D. E. Kirkly, 1583 
RoffKing, 601 

1881-2. 
Thomas Roberts, 6 1 1 
R. Roberts, J 509 

E. Williams, 1113 
Daintry Hollins, 755 

E. J. Chitty, 1621 
W. Aston, 1432 

1882-3. 
R. Roberts, 1509 
T. "Warren Thompson, 1 1 7 
T. Coxhead, 1674 
J. Cowen, 1336 

F. R. Spaull, 1 1 24 
W. E. Stuart, 262 

1883-4. 
E. Robinson, 998 
W. J. Lovegrove, 1 988 
W. Putman, 611 
T. Rought Jones, 1575 
P. H. V. Grosholz, 1583 

1884-5. 

G. K. Reason, 1 336 
R. Owen Jones, 1369 
V. C. L. Crump, 117 
Wm. Lloyd, 1143 

T. A. Forster, 1694 
E. W. Keatinge, 1674 

18t<5-6. 
John Blockley, 117 
T. Whitefoot, Junr., 1621 
John Smith, 601 
J. H. Williams, 611 
John Ginders, 1 575 
Charles Drew, 1432 



1886-7. 
T. P. Deakin, 1 1 7 
Wm. Belton, 117 

A. Marston, 611 
T. Pratt, 1621 

J. H. Parsons, 1432 

B. Bastow, 1575 

1887-8. 
L. A. Manning, 1 1 24 
A. S. Townsend, 1 1 7 
H. E. Roberts, 1621 
H. G. U. Elliott, 1896 
T. J. Barnett, 1120 
J. England, 1432 

1888-9. 
Herbert Major, 1 1 7 
Wm. Westcott, 1621 
W. J. Ogg, 2131 
F. Chubb, 1 1 20 
Samuel Bennion, 1575 
T. C. Bird, 1896 
1889-90. 

C. Lewis, 1896 
W. E. Sharp, 611 
A. S. Trevor, 1621 
KyffinG. Salter, 2131 
Tom Machin, 1120 

A. B. Deakin, 117 

1890-1. 
Wm. Adams, 1 1 7 
R. McBean, 6 1 1 
A. Nelson, 1432 
A. Exham, 1575 
H. R. Giles, 2131 
F. A. Bird, 1 896 

1891-2. 
Benjamin Blower, 1 1 7 
Wyndham Deedes, 262 
Thomas Allen, 1 1 20 
T. Bromwich, 1621 
C. E. Baddeley, 1896 
— Woodford, 1575 



Note — From 1852-1885 the Province included both North Wales and Shropshire, 
Many Brethren in the above lists belongred to more than one Lodge — as far as possible, 
I have tiied to credit each Brother to that Lodge in which he was in office at the 
time of his appointment. Absolute accuracy in the earlier names and numbers 
cannot be guaranteed, as the Provincial Minute Book is in places very incomplete^ 
and no other reliable source of information is attainable. 



62 FREEMASONRY IN 



Tub Lodge of 
St. ALKMUND, WHITCHURCH, No. 2311. 



The past liistory of the Craft in Whitchurch has been 
fully dealt with in the previous pages in coiuiection with the 
work of Major Shirreff in the closing years of the last century. 
That history was then practically identical with the history of 
the Province, and now, after an interval of 90 years, during which 
nothing could be recorded, its closing page may be written with 
bright auguries for a successful future. 

The Lodge of St. Alkmund was founded in 1889, its 
warrant being dated April 18th in that year. Its Consecration, 
by the R.W.P.G.M. Bro. Sir Offley Wakeman, Bart., took place 
on June 6th, the Installing Officer on that occasion being the 
W.P.D.G.M. Bro. Rowland Venables, P.A.G.D. of C. 

The establishment of the Lodge was largely due to the 
efforts of some zealous brethren of the Salopian Lodge of Charity, 
117. Of its sixteen founders no less than nine were members of 
that Lodge, and its first three Masters were all Past Masters of 
the same Lodge. Since its foundation it has rapidly gained 
ground, and has already attained a most honourable position in 
the Charity Returns. It now numbers nearly 30 subscribing 
members. Bro. Sir Watkin Wynn, Bart., P.P.G.W., the nephew 
of the late R.W.P.G.M., was one of the founders. 

I believe I am correct in stating that at the close of the 
year 1892 the Lodge will be strong enough in every way to stand, 
as it is intended that it should do, without any extraneous 
assistance, and conduct its Masonic work in a thoroughly efficient 



THE PROVINCE OF SHROPSHIRE. 



63 



■way. Its short list of W.M.'s given below, contains names which 
are a sure guarantee that the instruction received by the youngest 
Lodge in the Province, has been, and will be, most careful and 
accurate. 

List of Masters. 

1S89-90— Vincent Corbet Legh Crump, P.M., 1 1 7, P.G. Treasurer. 
1890-91— William Belton, P.M., 117, P.P.G.S.D. 
1891.92— William Adams, P.M., 117, P.G.A.D. of C. 



GRAND LODGE REGISTER OE MEMBERS 

OF THE 

WHITCHURCH LODGE, No. 3S8 (erased 1801.) 



Name. 


to 

< 


Profession. 


Residence 


When 
Made 


Joined 


Charles Shirreff 


48 


Major in Army 


VYhitcliurch 




15,11,85 


Rev. F. H. Egerton 


28 


Clerk 






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W. L. Brookes 


34 


Esq. 






53 


R. Bentley 


33 


Gardener 




15,11,85 




P. Newton 


39 


Innholder 




)) 




John Collier 


26 


Clerk 






)T 


Godfrey Wolley 


25 


Clerk 






)J 


Arthur Blaney 


25 


Surgeon 






3) 


William Turner 


33 


Architect 






3) 


John Dodd 


33 


Esqre. 


Leicester 


JJ 




Thomas Sandford 


21 


Esq re. 


of Sandford 


)J 




J. T. Meakin 


37 


Surgeon 


Whitchurch 


17,11,85 




Samuel Hodson 


27 


Draper 


3) 


24,11,85 




Peter Gregory 


46 


Attorney 


J^ 


15,12,85 




John Gregory 


22 


Do. 


jj 


J) 




James Simpson 


51 


Excise Ofl3.cer 


)T 


?) 




Charles Gibbons 


28 


Attorney 


Namptwich 


n 




George Watson 


42 


Do. 


Whitchurch 




14,1,86 


Thos. Pigot 


32 


Esqre. 


Wollerton 


2,2,86 




Henry Salmon 


54 


Clerk 


Audlam 


15,.3,86 




Henry J. Raynett 


23 


Army 




28,.3,86 




T. P. D. Salmon 


24 


Clerk 


Oxford 


)) 




Jas. Warren 


25 


Attorney 


Drayton 




3,4,86 



64 




FREEMASONRY 


IN 






Name. 


6 


Profession. 


Residence 


When 
Made. 


Joined 


William Wickstead 


29 


Barrister 


London 


3,4,86 




Samuel Marshall 


27 


Army- 




23,6,50 




Lord Kilmorrey 








}7 




Joseph Beddow 


45 


Grocer & Iron- 
monger 




20,2,87 




John Beck 


27 


do. 




8,3,87 




John Kempster 


40 


Grocer 




6,6,87 




Joseph Langford 


22 


Clerk 




13,5,!S8 




Thos. Jones 












John Gerrard 












T. J. Collier 


25 


Grocer 


Whitchurch 


18,6,89 




Sir Richard Hill 


55 


Baronet 


J) 


4,7,89 




John Hill 


48 


Esqre. 


jj 


JJ 




Rev. Brian Hill 


33 


Clerk 


J) 


JJ 




John Hill, Junr. 


20 


Esqre. 


jj 


J) 




Rev. W. Judgson 




Clerk 




1,10,89 




Edward Seagar 


45 


Iron Merchant 




1,11,90 




Richard Wingfield 


39lGentleman 




14,3,91 




Charles Walker 


22 


Clerk 




25,0,91 




Phi Tonnereau 


43 


Esqre. 




JJ 




Richard Thomas 


20 


Gardener 




5,10,91 




William Kent 


39 


Clerk 




J) 




Owen Roberts 


32 


Esqre. 




30,8,92 




Wm. Hill Watson 


45 


Attorney 


Whitchurch 


17,6,93 




Samuel Lowe 


22 


jj 


)j 


22,2,98 




William Collier 


24 


J) 


J) 


6,10,98 




Richard Crosse 


21 




jj 


12,10,99 




Richard Grant 






Drayton 


3,4,1800 





GRAND LODGE REGISTER OF MEMBERS 

OF THE 

EGERTON LODGE, WHITCHURCH, No. 445 (erased 1801.) 



Name. 


bo 


Profession. 


Residence 


When 
Made. 


Joined 


William Challnor 
Robert B. Jones 
John Manning 
Thos. Penlington 
Thos. Hinton 


45 
27 
29 
36 

28 


Plaisterer 

Stationer 

Cordwainer 

Farmer 

Butcher 


Wliitchurch 

J) 
J) 


17,3,89 

1^4,89 

19,0,89 

30,11,89 





THE 


PROVINCE OF SIIEOPSHIRE. 


65 


Name. 




Profession 


Residence 


When 
Made. 


Joined 


Thos. Wilson 


45 


Butcher 


Whitchurch 


28,12,1789 




Thos. Casewell 


33 


Watchm'k'r 


jj 


6,12,90 




John Edwards 


23 


Currier 


)} 


28,7,90 




Samuel Driver 


38 


Staymaker 


)t 


17,11,90 




John Morris 


35 


Painter 


)j 


16,12,90 




Samuel Cross 


20 


Waiter 






27,12,90 


Samuel Hotchkees 


37 


Clerk 


)) 


6,1,92 




John Pearson 


•28 


Farmer 


)j 


i> 




William Kirby 


27 


Musician 




24,7,92 




John Reese 


36 


Attorney 




6,12,92 




John Willet 


38 


Innkeeper 




J) 




John Grant 


54 


Writer 




27,12,92 




Edward Jones 


35 


Clerk 


J) 


4,9,93 






66 



FREEMASONRY IN 



THE BROWNLOW LODGE, ELLESMERE, 2131. 



EUesmere was one of the towns visited by Shirreff in the 
last century in his capacity of D.P.G.M. for the Province of 
■Shropshire. He did not, however, succeed in establishing a Lodge 
there, and until the last few years the Brethren of that town have 
been obliged to join Lodges at a distance. On the 12th of 
December, 1,885, a Warrant was issued for the foundation of the 
Brownlow Lodge. It was consecrated on the 11th of January 
following, by the R.W.P.G.M. Bro. Sir Offley Wakeman, the 
ceremony being performed in the Town Hall. The first founders 
were Bro. E. W. Prevost, A. T. Akroyd, and W. J. Ogg. The 
Brownlow was the first Lodge warranted in this Province after 
its separation from North Wales. Bro. H. R. Giles was the first 
initiate, and can thus claim to be the first W.M., who was the 
first initiate of the first consecrated Lodge in the new Province. 
It now numbers 21 members, and seems to be gradually but 
surely gaining ground. 

List of Masters. 

1886— Edward WilHam Prevost. 

1887— Arthur Thomas Akroyd, P.P.G.A.D. of C. 

1888— Walter John Ogg, P.P.G.S. of W. 

1889— Kyffin George Salter, P.P.G.S. W. 

1S90— Henry Richard Giles, P.G.R. 

1891— Arthur John Prince Child 



THE PROVINCE OF SHROPSHIRE. 67 



THE AUDLEY LODGE, NEWPORT, 1896. 



This was the last Lodge founded in Shropshire before its 
erection into a separate Province. The Warrant is dated 
February 15th, 1881, and the Lodge was consecrated on May 
20th in the same year by the R.W.P.G.M. Bro. Sir Watkirf 
Wynn, assisted by Bro. W. H. Spaull, P.G. Sec. 

At a lodge held on September 26th, 1882, an address of 
congratulation was presented to Bro. W. Masefield, Grand Std. 
Bro., P.D.P.G.M., Worcestershire, who was a native of Newport, 
and an honorary member of the Lodge. At the close of the 
business a banquet was, by a curious coincidence, held in the very 
house in which the venerable guest of the Lodge had been born 
82 years previously. There are now more than 30 subscribing 
members on its roll. 

List or Masters. 
1881— John Bodenham, P.P.G.W., P.P.G. Treas., Staffs. 
1882 — John Bodenham. 
1883— R. T. Masefield. 
1884— Rev. C. R. Gordon, P.P.G.C. 
1885— Thomas James, P.P.G.S. of W. 
1886— Tom Collins, P.P.G.J.W. 
1887— PI. G. U. Elliott, P.P.G.R. 
1888— T. C. Bird, P.P.G.J.D. 
1889— Charles Lewis, P.P.G. Steward. 
1890— F. A. Bird, P.P.G. Sword Bearer 
1891— C. E. Baddeley, P.G. Steward. 

This list gives the year of installation of the various 
Past Masters. 



68 FEEEMASONEY IN 



THE CASTLE LODGE, BRIDGNORTH, 162L 



The Castle Lodge has had three predecessors in Bridg- 
north. The first of these was a nameless " Ancient " Lodge 
founded in 1767. It met at the Crown Inn, Low Town, and 
was numbered 147. It apparently existed for a very short period, 
as there are no records in Grand Lodge except for the year of 
its foundation. The fate of its Warrant is told in the notes 
placed at the end of the preceding list of extinct Lodges in the 
Province. A second Lodge, the Lodge of Friendship, meeting 
at the Hand and Bottle Inn, and numbered 413 on the roll of 
the "Modern" Grand Lodge, was founded in 1771. It was 
erased in 1783, its number in 1780 having been altered to 321, 
and in 1781 to 322. The Lodge of Industry, founded in 1799, 
is the third Lodge referred to. It originally met at the Hand 
and Bottle Inn, but in 1800 removed to the Raven Inn, where 
it continued to meet during the remainder of its existence. Its 
original number on the " Modern " roll was 578 ; at the Union 
it became 597, and in 1832 this number was again changed to 398. 
It was erased in 1853, though, as no names were registered in 
Grand Lodge after 1840, it had doubtless ceased working some 
time before the former date. Its formal erasure was due, we 
may readily believe, to the reports made to Grand Lodge by the 
Officers of the then newly constituted Province of North Wales 
and Shropshire. 

The records of this Lodge would be particularly valuable 

•if they could be recovered, but unfortunately the clue to their 

whereabouts cannot at present be followed up. Some of the 

and other Masonic possessions of the Lodge are however still in 

existence, and are now in the custody of the Castle Lodge. 



THE PROVINCE OF SIIEOPSI-IIRE. 69 



These relics consist of — ■ 

1. The Charter, dated March 4th, 1818, for a Royal Arch 
Chapter to be called " the Agenorian Chapter," working 
in connection with the Lodge of Industry, 597, and to 
hold its first meeting on March 29th in the same year. 

This Chapter had undoubtedly been working from about 
the year 1801 under the wing of the Grand Chapter, unofficially 
promoted by the " Modern " Grand Lodge prior to the Union. 
The Charter in question was, therefore, probably only one of 
confirmation (though it certainly is not expressed to be such) 
granted in 1818 by the United Grand Chapter(i) estabhshed in 
1817. The Companions named in it are Thomas Southern, 
Edward Parry, Thomas Devey, Richard Baker, Richard Holmes, 
John Nicholas, William Page, Richard Dukes, and Edward 
Page, Junr., all of whom were duly registered members of the 
Agenorian Chapter before 1816, except John Nicolas and Edward 
Page, Junr., against whose names there is no date in the Grand 
Chapter Register, and whose exaltation, judging by the sequence 
of dates, may have .taken place at any time between 1816-1818. 
Fifty-two names in all are upon this Register. Amongst them 
will be found the names of three members of the Salopian Lodge, 
viz. : — Benjamin Partridge, P) John Jenks, and John Jaundrel 
(or Jandrel), and two of the Salopian Lodge of Charity, viz. : — 
William Dodd and Robert Powis. (3) The last name was registered 
in the year 1836, so that the Chapter probably ceased working a 
year or two before the Lodge of Industry. Its number in 1801 
was 118, but after the establishment of the United Grand Chapter, 
in accordance with the rules of that Institution, it took the num- 
ber of the Lodge to which it was attached. The Charter is in 
capital preservation, being framed and covered with glass. 

(1) See Salopian Lodge History for 1817. 

(2) See Salopian Lodge History for 1702. 

(3) See History o£ Salopian Lodge of Charity infra. 



70 FREEMASONRY IN 



2. A large Portrait, in oils, of Bro. Richard Baker (Barker in 

the Grand Chapter Register, 1815) arranged in both 
Royal Arch and Craft clothing, including the collar and 
jewel of a W.M. 

3. A very small Royal Arch Pedestal with the letters S.K.I., 

H.K.T., and H.A.B. arranged as a monogram. 

4. A crimson silk banner on which are emblazoned the twelve 

Ensigns or Bearings of the Twelve Tribes of Israel as 
used in a R.A. Chapter. 

5. Three Crowns evidently intended for the three Principals of 

the Chapter. They seem not to have been worn, but 
placed on pedestals near the chairs of the Principals. 

6. A very handsome Cavalry Sword, with the following inscrip- 

tions : — On one side — " To the Lodge of Industry, No. 
578, Bridgnorth, 1799." On the other side—" A token 
of remembrance from the Brethren of the 21st Regt. 
Light Dragoons," and on the back edge — " Quarter 
Masters Simms, Sharpley, Hurst, Hackete, "Whiteaker."(i) 
It is now used by the Tyler of the Castle Lodge. 

7. A large China Punch-bowl, decorated with many Masonic 

emblems, including the letter G in the centre of a 
blazing star ; two columns or pillars surmounted by 
globes ; the square pavement ; the sun, crescent moon, 
and seven stars ; an ear of corn near a fall of water ; 
the Volume of the Sacred Law ; the square and com- 
passes, level, square, plumb rule ; a semi-circular 
protractor, &c., ifcc. 

There is nothing upon the bowl to indicate that it was 
the property of the Lodge of Industry, except represen- 
tations of two bee-hives, with the bees depicted busily 
at work, symbolically referring to the Lodge as the 
home of Industry. 

(1) See Salopian Lodge History lor the year 1800. 



THE PROVINCE OF SHROPSHIRE. 71 

A very curious gallows-looking framework for raising, by 
means of pulleys, the perfect ashlar. The pulleys are 
inscribed " Lodge of Industry," and the ashlar is fitted 
up so as to illustrate the principle of the lewis. 

Various working tools, gavels, heavy maul, transparency, 
collar jewel of the W.M., &c., &c. The working tools 
are more fitted for an operative than a speculative 
Lodge ; the level is about four feet wide by three feet 
high, and the other tools are made in proportion. 



10. A portion of the back of the Chair of the W.M. representing 
the Sun, and a circular board depicting the Crescent 
Moon and Seven Stars, in gold, on a dark blue ground. 



The only reminiscence of the working of the Lodge of 
Industry that I have been able to recover from the memory of 
living brethren is in relation to the working of the third degree. 
Bro. T. Whitefoot, Senr. asserts, that, in the olden time, a very 
impressive portion of that ceremony, my readers will know to 
what I refer, was worked with an adherence to reality which 
Modern Masons do not imitate. From the list of members 
appended it will be seen that 33 candidates were initiated in the 
year of its foundation — a good start for a Lodge dating from 
the last century. After the extinction of this Lodge, Bridgnorth 
remained without a Lodge until the year 1876. On Aug. 25th 
in that year, the Castle Lodge was consecrated by Bro. Goldsboro, 
its "Warrant being dated May 30th. On that occasion Bro. 
Joseph Stokes was installed as W.M. Since its foundation the 
Lodge has had a quiet but useful existence; it now numbers 
about thirty subscribing members, and is conspicuous in its 
devotion to the cause of charity. Its musical ritual is exceed- 
ingly well done, much of its efficiency in this respect being due 
to the loving care bestowed upon it by Bro. J. Sewell, P.P.G.O. 



72 



FREEMASONRY IN 



List op Masters. 
•1876-7-J"oseph Stokes, P.P.G.R. (Worcester.) 
1877-8— Edward Jones Chittey, P.P.G.A.D. of 0. 
1878-9— Horace B. Southwell, P.P.G.O. 
1879-80-Abraham Colles. 
1880-1— Thomas Pratt, P.P.G. Std. B. 
1881-2— William Simms, P.P.G.P. 
1882-3— Edmund M. Southwell. 
1883-4— Thomas Whitefoot, Junr., P.P.G.J.W. 
1884-5— W. Lascelles Southwell, P.P.G.J.W. 
1885-6— James Hughes Cooksey, P.P.G.R. 
1886-7— Henry E. Roberts, P.P.G.J.D. 
1887-8— William Westoott, P.P.G. Std. B. 
1888-9— Alfred S. Trevor, P.P.G. Std. B. 
1889-90-Rev. Reginald T. H. Lucas, P.P.G.C. 
1890-1— Thomas Bromwich, P.G. Steward. 
1891-2— William Thomas Smith. 



GRAND LODGE REGISTER OF MEMBERS 



OF THE 



LODGE OF INDUSTRY, BRIDGNORTH, No. 578 
(erased 1853.) 







Business 


W'hen 




Name. 


6 


or 


Residence 'Made 


Joined 






Profession. 








Richard Holmes 








1799 




William Hall 












Thomas Thomson 




Surgeon's Mate 


21st Regt. 






John Pearce 




Currier 








Henry Veritrice 




Stationer 




J} 




Josiah Garthide 




Lieutenant 


21st Regt. 






William Simms 




Quarter-Master 


)J 


J) 




Richard Bagley 




Innkeeper 




)) 




John Gibson 












Whitaker 




Sergt. Major 


21st Regt. 


jj 




Thomas Wilkinson 




Quarter Master 


J) 


J) 





THE PROVINCE OF SHROPSIIIEE. 



73 



Name. 



William Hackett 
"William Blades 
John Hartley 
William Evrey 
William Sharpley 
Edward Williams 
William Page 
Joseph Bangham 
William Lewis 
James Hamson 
Thomas Southorn 
William Smith 
— Adams 
Edward Bowen 
Thomas Hirst 
Edward Parry 
Edward Darke 
William Edwards 
Richard Elcock 
John Morris 

Bennett 
Francis Davis 
Joseph Steward 
George Pitt 
Samuel Roden 
J. Holmes 
James Griffiths 
William Harts- 

horne 
John Hardwick 
John Christopher 
Kiflfernsteen 
John Fletcher 
Thomas Parker 
Cornelius Wheeler 
Isaiah John Guest 
James Cureton 
Matthias Crowther 
Edward Stephens 
Thomas Milner 

Samuel Goasnell 
Thomas Bean 
Edward Pearce 
Thomas Devey 



27 
31 
23 

29 

45 
23 

27 

58 
25 



Profession. 

Quarter-Master 

Lieutenant 

Serjeant 

Corporal 

Quarter-Master 

Sadler 

Taylor 

Innkeeper 

Attorney 

Serjeant 

Pipemaker 

Comedian 

Serjeant 

Farmer 

Quarter-Master 

Attorney 

Officer Excise 

Farmer 

Attorney 



Malster 

Whitesmith 

Farmer 

jj 
Brickmaker 

Attorney 

Clockmaker 
Farmer 



27 
22 
26 
33 
28 
53 
25 
24 
23 

40 
33 
33 

42 



Serjeant 

Surgeon 

Tinman 

Watchmaker 

Mercer 

Gardener 

Miller 

Painter 

Farmer 



Baker 

Attorney 



Residence. 

21st Regt. 

)) 
)) 
)J 

Bridgnorth 

21 si Regt. 

21st Regt. 
21st Ree-t. 



When 
Made. 

1799 



2,3,99 
24,8,99 



28,9,99 
23',11,99 



Joined 



Broseley 



Burcott 

53rd Regt. 

Bridgnorth 

Broseley 

Bridgnorth 

Broseley 

Bridgnorth 



Eardington 



Upper Arley 

Harley 

Bridgnorth 



9,5,1803 

6,6,1803 

8,8,1803 

30,1,1804 

30,4,1804 

17,6,1805 

24,6,1805 

14,10,1805 

15,4, '1806 

or 1807 

24,6,1807 

24,8,1807 

6,2,1809 

24,6,1809 



74 



FREEMASONRY IN 



Name. ^ 

George Lewis 29 

William Nock 2t< 

George Hartshorn 44 
John Nicholas 33 

John Daniel 39 

Samuel Holloway 35 
Thomas Wardell 40 
William Bright 25 
William Pearce 35 
Thomas Roberts 32 
Richard Gwynn 48 
George Gwynn 40 
John Brown 26 

Richard Corbet 

Cooper 
Thomas Jenkins 37 
Benjamin Turner 44 
John Dallow 38 

Rev. George Hugh 

Hazlewood 42 
John Boulton 2 

John Longmore 29 
Thomas Nock 51 

William Hardwick 40 
Charles Gabert 36 
William Rudge 54 
Samuel Reynolds 42 
James Brampton 26 
Nathum Blacker 45 
Benj aminPartridge 
Richard Dukes 
Robert Pearce 
Thomas Higgs 
James Newton 23 
Joseph Bennett 36 
Rev. Chas. C. 

Whitmore 26 
Richard Baker 31 
Thomas Boulton 32 
Thomas Whitmore 31 
Robert Heighway 43 
Thomas Nevitt 42 
Wm. Beech Howell 46 
Richard Phillips 40 



Profession. 

Mercer, &c. 

Attorney 

Victualler 

Brazier 

Farmer 

Cooper 

Excise Officer 

Grocer 

Potter 

Mercer, &c. 

Shoemaker 

Chandler 

Druggist 



Architect 
Innkeeper 
Carpenter 

Clerk 

Lieutenant R.N. 

Hatter 

Innkeeper 

Attorney 

Gentleman 

Brewer 

Innkeeper 

Surgeon 

Major 

Book-keeper 

Victualler 



Yeoman 
Servant 

Clerk 
Esquire 
Esquire 
Esquire, M.P. 
Yeoman 
Barge Owner 
Plumber, (fee. 
Farmer 



Residence. 


When 
Made. 


Broseley 


28,8,1809 


)) 


28,11,1809 


jj 


25,12,1809 


Bridgnorth 


3,2,1806 


Woodlands 


4,8,1806 


BilHngsley 


30,9,1806 


Bridgnorth 


27,10,1806 


Broseley 


25,12,1809 


Binthall 


JJ 


Broseley 


J) 


Bridgnorth 


12,11,10 




11,3,11 


Apley Park 


9,4,11 


Billingsley 


13,5,11 


DeuxhUl 


10,6,11 


Bridgnorth 


24,6,11 


J) 


5,8,11 


J) 
J) 


3,2,12 


J) 
Apley Park 




jy 


1,6,12 


Bridgnorth 


J) 


>) 


21,12,12 


J) 


13,1,13 


Apley Park 


15,2,13 


>j 


17,3,13 


Stockton 


4,6,13 


Bridgnorth 


3,7,13 


)j 


3,7,13 


Apley Park 


23,7,13 


Stockton 


16,8,13 


Bridgnorth 


21,8,13 


)j 


13,9,13 


Astley 


11,10,13 


Abbots 





Joined 



2,3,12 
1,6,12 



THE PROVINCE OP SHROPSHIRE. 



75 



Name. 

Peter Charlton 
Peter Scahill 

Thomas Crumpton 

George Littleford 
William Stokes ' 

Richard Weaver 
Samuel Holloway 
Samuel Rowden 
David Pritehard 
Matthias Crowther 
John Parks 
William Scott 
Robert Jenkins 
Edmund Steward 
Henry Pagett 
William Dallewy 
Stanley Crowther 
Thomas Glase 
John White 
Benjamin Lloyd 
William Barrey 

WilUam Ball Elton 
John Thomas 

Ragley 
James Long 
John Williams 
John Kynaston 
Richard Paget 

Drinkwater 



40 



27 



Profession. 

Gardener 
Landscape Gar 

doner 
Gentleman 

Farmer 
Gentleman 

Farmer 

Innkeeper 

Brickmaker 

Gentleman 

Innkeeper 



Residence. 



Apley Park 



Astley 

Abbots 

i> 

Whitemere, 
Salop 

Billingsley 

Broseley 

Bridgnorth 



Excise Officer 

Hatter 

Farmer 

Miller 

Gentleman 

Plumber&Glaziei 

Watchmaker 

Gentleman 

Gentleman 

Plasterer 



Jeweller 
Currier 
Sadler 
Innkeeper 



34 
21|Merchant 



Billingsley 
Stockton 
Chelton 
Bridgnorth 

>j 
Kindleford 
Bridgnorth 
Hunley, Co. 

Stafford 

5) 

City of Cov- 
entry 
Broseley 
Bridgnorth 



Shrewsbury 



When 
Made. 

1,8,14 



28,11,14 

23,12,14 
30,1,15 

18,3,15 

1816 

9,4,17 

11,5,17 

6,3,20 

29,5,20 

8,5,20 

25,9,20 

18,8,21 

4,4,25 

6,6,25 

1,8,25 

30,1,26 

4,2,28 



6,3,28 

5,30 

15,8,34 

4,1,31 



30,5,36 



Joined 



76 



PKEEMASONRY IN 



GRAND CHAPTER REGISTER 

OP THE 

MEMBERS OF THE AGENORIAN CHAPTER, No. 118 

(erased 1853). 







Exalted 


6 




Members' Names 


6C 


or 


be 


Title, Profession, &c. 




< 


Admitted. 


^ 




PartridgeBenJ amin 




1801 




Bookseller 


Southern, Thomas 








Pipe Maker 


Hardsman, William 








Paper Maker 


Dark, Edward 








Agent 


Jenks, John. 


29 


12,8,1802 




Currier 


Bennett, John 


35 


15,9 „ 




Malster 


Nunns, John 








Gentleman 


Williams, Edward 


45 


10,9,1801 




Saddler 


Parry, Edward 


40 


)) 




Attorney 


Bangham, Joseph 


43 


J» 




Innkeeper 


Page, William 


30 


12,8,1802 




Tailor 


Hornblower, John 


25 


)J 




Iron Master 


Dukes, Richard 


33 


15,9 „ 




Innkeeper 


Hall, William 


35 


)) 




jj 


Taylor, William 


55 


9,10 „ 




Gentleman 


Bagley, Richard 


45 


)) 




Innkeeper 


Jandrell, John 


36 


)J 




Schoolmaster 


Holmes, Richard 




1803 




P.S. 


Higgs, Thomas 


37 


7,1,1803 




Barge Owner 


Williams, John 


40 


n 




Clerk 


Lewis, Wilham 


24 


21,5 „ 




Attorney 


Cox, James 


41 


3) 




Innkeeper 


Pearce, John 


24 


24,9 „ 




Currier 


Fletcher, John 


22 


29,12 „ 




Surgeon 


Hallen, George 


40 


4,2,1804 




Innkeeper 


William 










Guest, Isaiah 


30 


28,12,1806 




Mercer 


Hartshorn, William 


36 


3) 




Watchmaker 


Griffiths, James 


33 


J3 




Attorney 


Marshall, John 


49 


27,12,1807 




Gentleman 


Daniel, John 


38 


27,12,1808 




Farmer 


Barker, Ricd., Esq. 


38 


20,6,1815 




Gent., Bridgnorth 


Boulton, Thomas 


36 


3) 




)> )j 


Devey, Thos., Esq. 


42 


JJ 




)5 


Hardwick, William 


38 


35 




JJ ,, 


Blacker, Latham 


16 


7,8 „ 




Esqre. 


Jenkins, Thomas 


44 


5,9 „ 

1 




Architect, Apley 

Park 



THE PROVINCE OF SHEOPSHIUE. 



77 



NEW REGISTER (from 1818). 







Exalted 


6 




Members' Names 



^ 


or 


M 


Title, Profession, &c 




< 


Admitted. 


^ 




Nicholas, John 










Page, Edward, Jun. 










Reynolds, Samuel 




29,1,1819 






Pritchard, David 




25,10 „ 






Hazlewood, Rev. 




17,1,1820 






George Hugh 










Russell, John 




19,11,1827 


526 




Crowther, Stanley 




)> 


597 




Lloyd, Benjamin 




7,1,1828 


)) 




Brown, John 




)) 


)J 




Glase, Thomas 




5,10 „ 


)) 




Dallewy, William 




JJ 


)> 




Powis, Robert 


49 


12,2,1843 


135 


Innkeeper 


Dodd, William 


41 


)J 


)) 


Painter 


HoUyoak, Henry 


26 


5,1,1836 


435 


Captain 


Law, Paul 


35 


J) 


5J 


Innkeeper 


Williams, John 


49 


It 


398 


Saddler 




78 



PEEEMASONEY IN 



THE CLIVE LODGE, MARKET DRAYTON, 1575. 



This Lodge, which takes its name from the great 
Shropshire hero Lord Olive, was warranted on October 23rd, 
1875. The names of its founders, given upon the Warrant, are 
George Gordon Warren, John Tayleur, John Bodenham, William 
Henry Harding, Thomas Rought Jones, Frederick Charles 
Cockagne, and John Bell Unsworth. Bro. Warren was installed 
as its first Master by Bro. J. Loxdale Warren. It now contains 
about 16 subscribing members. 

List of Mastees. 

1876-7— George Gordon Warren, P.M., 726-887. 

1877-8— „ P.P.G.R. StafiF., P.P.G.S.W. 

1878-9— John Bodenham, P.M., 1896, P.P.G.S.W., P.P.G. 
Treas. Staff. 

1879-80-Jabea C. Jones. 

1880-1— Samuel Bennion, P.P.G.J.D. 

1881-2— Thomas Rought Jones, P.P.G. Steward. 

1882-3 — George Lashmour. 

1883-4^ohn Ginders, P.P.G.A.D. of 0. 

1884-5— Thomas E. Chritchley. 

1885-6 — Benjamin Bastow, P.P.G. Steward. 

1886-7— Thomas Ginders, P.P.G.A.P. 

1887-8 — Joseph Gouldbourne. 

1888-9— Frederick C. Woodforde. 

1889-90-Arthur F. E. Exham, P.P.G. Steward. 

1890-91- „ P.G. Standard B. 

The list of names registered in Grand Lodge as belonging 
to the extinct Anchor and Hope Lodge, Woore, is placed next, 
as being probably of greater interest to the Brethren from 
Market Drayton than to those hailing from any other part of the 
Province. 



THE PROVINCE OP SHROPSHIRE. 



79 



GRAND LODGE REGISTER 



OF THE 



MEMBERS OF THE ANCHOR & HOPE LODGE, WOORE, 

No. 644 (erased 1853.) 







Business 




When 


Members Names 


Age. 


or 
Profession. 


Residence. 


Made 
Masons. 


John Bromfield 


W.M. 








James Foden 


s.w. 








James Barratt 


J.W. 








Wm. Preston 










Bradbury 










Henry Wittington 










Henry Church 










Moody 










Thomas Barratt 










William Crutchley 










James Clark 










Richard Morris 


23 


Carpenter 


Madely 


8,2,1838 


James Broomhall 


40 


Ground 

Bailiff 


)j 


?J 


Richard Clough 


33 


Farmer 


Woore 


24,1,1839 


Richard Benbow 


44 


)j 


Dorrington 


3) 


George Hopwood 


42 


jj 


Ashley 


20,6 „ 


Richard Stanway 


58 


)) 


Knighton 


25,7 „ 


Ralph Challioner 


35 


j» 


Hunsterston 


J» 


Daniel Hewitt 


24 


Draper 


Woore 


)J 


Wm. Horatio 










Pankhurst 


27 


Manufactur'r 


Hanley 


3) 


William Machin 


29 


Attorney 


J) 


J3 


Thomas Keay 


46 


Farmer 


Oakley 


19,12,1839 


Thomas Bromfield 


30 


Butcher 


Wybunbury 


16,4,1840 


Thomas Wooley 


39 


Gardener 


Oakley 


9,7,1840 



80 FREEMASONRY IN 



FITZALAN LODGE, OSWESTRY, No. 1432. 



This, the junior Lodge in Oswestry, was warranted on 
April 5th, 1873, and consecrated on June 21st in the same year, 
Bro. Goldsboro, P.P.G.S.W. was the Consecrating Officer. The 
names of the brethren mentioned on the warrant are J. W. 
Wallace, Alexander Walker,. Robert de la Poer Beresford, 
J. Ralph Ormsby Gore (afterwards Lord Harlech), George Owen, 
and John Ward, but Bros. Edward Bremner Smith and Samuel 
Hazlit had a very considerable share in its foundation. It now 
possesses 26 subscribing members. On August 4th, 1876, a 
Petition for a Chapter was approved by the P.G. Lodge, but 
nothing further seems to have been done in the matter. About 
the year 1880 a Lodge of Instruction met in connection with the 
Lodge, but it is now practically defunct. 

List op Masters. 

1873-4— John Winfield Wallace. 

1874-5— Robert de la Poer Beresford, P.P.G.J.D. 

1875-6 — Edward Bremner Smith. 

1876-7— Samuel Hazlit. 

1877-8— David Vaughan. 

1878-9— William Aston, P.P.G.S. of W. 

1879-80-John B. Murless. 

1880-1— William Griffiths. 

1881-2— John Maclardy, P.P.G.S.D. 

IS 82-3— Richard Brayne, P. P.G. A. S. 

1883-4- John Thomas Whitridge, 

1884-5— James Henry Parsons, P.G.J.D. 

1885-6— Charles Drew, P.P.G.J.D. 

1886-7— James England, P. P.G. Steward. 

1SS7-8— Arthur Thomas Akroyd, P.P.G.O. 

1888-9— William Aylmer Lewis, P.P.G.S.D. 

1889-90- Alexander Nelson, P.P.G.A.P. 

1890-1— James Henry Parsons, P.G.J.D. 



THE PROVINCE OP SHROPSHIKE. 81 



THE LODGE OP ST. OSWALD, OSWESTRY, 1124. 



As I have already noticed there were two Lodges founded 
in Oswestry in the last century — one in 1744, which met at the 
Masons' Arms, and lasted for about ten years, its number 
throughout that period being 119 — the other, originally founded 
in 1771 at Wynnstay, and called by that name, was removed to 
Oswestry in 1785, and only survived for a few years, its number 
being 324. As the name denotes, this latter Lodge was founded 
at the residence of Sir W. W. Wynn, Bart., in Denbighshire, but 
all records of its existence, if any were in fact preserved, were 
destroyed in the great lire in 1858. After its extinction, 
Oswestry remained without a Lodge until the year 1866, when 
the Lodge of St. Oswald was founded. Its first meeting was 
held by dispensation, on Oct. 1st, when J. R. Ormsby Gore, Esq., 
M.P., the first Lord Harlech, was proposed as a member, and on 
Nov. 5th it was duly consecrated by Sir W. W. Wynn, Bart., 
R.W.P.G.M., assisted by Bro. Goldsboro. 

Amongst the founders who are still alive will be found 
the names of Bro. Lord E. H. Hill Trevor, of Brynkinalt, and 
Bro. W. H. Spaull, now for many years past P.G. Sec. The 
Lodge was presented by the R.W.P.G.M. with the three antique 
chairs and six candlesticks formerly used by the old Wynnstay 
Lodge, and it thus possesses relics of the past many years older 
than those belonging to any other Lodge in the Province. 

On Nov. 1st, 1869, the R.W.P.G.M. under the banner of 
the Lodge, laid the foundation stone of the Oswestry Cottage 
Hospital, which has since proved itself to be a most useful Public 
Institution — Bro. W. H. Spaull was the Architect. The cere- 
mony was most impressive, and during its course the following 



82 rnEEMASONRY IN 



hymn, specially composed for the occasion by the Rev. W. Wal- 
sham How, now Bishop of Wakefield, was sung by the Choir, 



Tune — Jam Lucis. 

O Thou, thro' sufiering perfect made. 
On "Whom the bitter Cross was laid. 
In hours of sickness, grief, or pain. 
No sufferer turns to Thee in vain. 



The halt, the maim'd, the sick, the blind, 
Sought not in vain Thy tendance kind : 
Now in Thy poor Thyself we see, 
And minister thro' them to Thee. 



O loving Saviour, Thou canst cure. 
The pains and woes Thou didst endure : 
To Thee this house. Physician Great, 
In lowly faith we dedicate. 



O heal the bruisfed heart within, 
O save our souls, all sick with sin : 
Give life and health in bounteous store. 
That we may praise Thee evermore. 



So Mote it be. 



A Special Masonic Edition of the Oswestry Advertizer, 
dated Nov. 1st, 1869, contains a full report of the proceedings, 
and may be consulted for further information. 

In the year 1872, the R.W.P.G.M. built a Lodge Room, 
attached to the Wynnstay Arms Hotel, for the use of the Lodge, 
and in this room it heis since continued to meet. 



THE PROVINCE OF SHROPSHIRE. 83 

The Lodge possesses an old and interesting print dedicated 
to the Grand Lodge of England by Bro. Jeffreys, representing 
the " Distinguishing Characteristic of Masonry — Charity exerted 
on proper objects." A copy of this print is reproduced in the 
left hand panel of the certificate of thanks given by the Com- 
mittee of the Girls School to the Stewards at its festivals. Its 
subject is Ruspini, the founder of that School, leading one child 
by the hand, and followed by many others. 

List op Masters. 

1866-7— William Henry Hill, RP.G.J.D. 

1867-8— George Owen, P.P.G.S.W. 

1868-9 — Captain J. Hamer. 

1869-70-E. Elias. 

1870-1— W. H. Spaull, P.G. Seo. 

1871-2— R. J. Ormsby Gore, M.P., P.P.D.G.M. 

1872-3— John Ward. 

1873-4— Ephraim Wood, P.P.G.S.W. 

1874-5— Alexander Walker, P.P.G.S. of W. 

1875-6— John Thomas, P.P.G. Steward. 

1876-7— William Burton, P.P.G. Steward. 

1877-8— H. C. Corlield. 

1878-9— Rev. A. L. Taylor, P.P.G.C. 

1879-80-F. Chaplin. 

1880-1— Stanley Leighton, M.P., P.P.G.S.W. 

1881-2— F. R. Spaull, P.P.G.R. 

1882-3— R. G. Yenables, D.P.G.M., P.A.G.D. of C. (Eng.) 

1883-4— A. 0. Spaull, P.P.G.R. 

1884-5— George J. Morgan, P.P.G. Std. B. 

1885-6— L. A. Manning, P.P.G. Std. B. 

1886-7— Henry Morris. 

1887-8— Sir W. W. Wynn, Bart., P.P.G.S.W. 

1888-9— J. P. Cartwright, P.P.G.A.D. of C. 

1889-90- Rev. J. B. Meredith, P.P.G.C. 

1890-1— Rev. Henry Dunkin, P.G.C. 



8i FREEMASONRY IX 



THE LODGE OF ST. MILBURGA, IRONBRIDGE, 

No. 1120. 



This Lodge was warranted on June 5th, 1866, held its 
first meeting on September 11th, and was consecrated on Nov. 
27th in the same year. Bro. Goldsboro, P.P.G.W., performed 
the Ceremony of Consecration. Its first W.M., Bro. Bryce 
Smith, who is still living, had been W.M. of the Salopian Lodge 
of Charity in the previous year, and was one of the founders of 
the Shrewsbury Lodge of Instruction in 1862. In 1890 it num- 
bered 33 subscribing members. 

List op Masters. 

1866-7— Bryce Smith, P.P.G.J.D. 

1867-8— Henry Woolner, P.P.G.S. of W. 

1868-9 — James Procter. 

1869-70- Alexander Grant. 

1870-1— F. G. Yates. 

1871-2 — James Bates. 

1872-3— Robert Anslow. 

18734— Thomas G. Thursfield. 

1874-5 — Edward Lawrence. 

1875-6— John Machin, P.P.G.A.D. of C. 

1876-7— J. 0. W. Lister, P.P.G.A.D. of C. 

1877-8— Sir C. B. H. Soame, Bart., P.G.J. W. 

1878-9— Thomas Morgan. 

1879-80-James Smart, P.P.G.O. 

1880-1— Matthew Garbett. 

1881-2— George Stevenson, P.P.G. Std. B. 

1882-3— William Taylor. 

1883-4— Henry Stubbs. 

1884-5— Louis E. WoUstein, P.P.G.S.D. 

1885-6— John Jenks, P.P.G. Std. B. 

1886-7— Thomas J. Barnett, P.P.G. Std. B. 

1888-9— Frederick Chubb, P.P.G. Swd. B. 

1889-90-Tom Machin, P.G.D. of C. 

1890-1— Rev. J. T. W. Claridge, P.P.G.C. 

1891-2— Thomas Allen, P.G. Steward. 



THE PROVINCE OF SHROPSIIIKE. 85 



THE LODGE OF THE MARCHES, LUDLOW, 611. 



In the year 1791, a Lodge was warranted by Thomas 
Dunckerley, at Kington, in Herefordshire, of which county he 
was then P.G.M. It was called the Silurian Lodge, 576, but 
this number was in the following year altered to 485. It 
originally met at the Sun Inn, but subsequently removed to the 
Kings's Head. Its first Master was Charles James, who in 1791 
visited the Salopian Lodge, and was then described as W.M. of 
the Kinton Lodge. The names of 35 members only appear on 
the Grand Lodge Register, the last of these being registered in 
1796, in which year also the last payment to Grand Lodge was 
made. Its subsequent fate is described in the following passages 
taken from " A History of Kington, by a Member of the 
Mechanics Institute of Kington.'' "This Lodge continued in 
existence till the year 1800, and then separated, and divided the 
cash among the brethren ; the Lodge furniture was sold in the 
year 1804 by the Treasurer to a person in Ludlow for the sum of 
twenty-two pounds and ten shillings." A List of the Officers 
given by the same writer, shows that Lodges under the care of 
Dunckerley followed the usual practice of the " Moderns,'' and 
did not appoint Deacons. In the same year that the Silurian 
Lodge was founded, we know that ShirreiF, then D.P.G.M. for 
Shropshire, was in correspondence with a Captain Bridgewaters 
about the foundation of a Lodge at Ludlow. The project was 
however abandoned, and I know of no reference to Masonry in 
that town till the year 1805. There can be little doubt, however, 
that the purchase of the jewels and furniture of the Silurian 
Lodge before alluded to, was made in contemplation of the 
foundation of the Mercian Lodge in Ludlow, which took place in 
that year. At all events it is a fact that these articles passed 
immediately into the possession of the new Lodge. In addition, 
the warrant of the defunct Lodge was transferred to the Mercian 



86 



FREEMASONRY IN 



Lodge. This practice of transferring warrants, instead of issuing 
new ones was a consequence of a statute, passed in 1799, directed 
against secret societies. Existing Lodges of Freemasons were 
specially exempted from its operation, but the act was construed 
as prohibiting the foundation of new ones. To evade this Law, 
both Grand Lodges were accustomed to issue transfers of the 
warrants of extinct Lodges to brethren desirous of forming fresh 
ones, and such transfers were supposed to legalise the existence 
of the new Lodges. It is evident that such transfers implied no 
necessary connection between the two bodies ; indeed it rarely 
happens that so close a connection can be traced as in the case 
under examination. In addition to possessing the same warrant, 
jewels, and furniture,, the two Lodges had at least one member 
in common, in the person of the Rev. John Thomcis, of Lucton. 
The Mercian Lodge met at the Angel Inn; its number, 485, 
derived from the Silurian Lodge, was, at the Union in 1813, 
changed to 528. The Grand Lodge Register shows a total of 27 
names registered. Its active existence terminated shortly after 
1826, though it was not formerly erased till 1832. Towards the 
close of its career of active existence, its list of members was very 
small, and there is a tradition in the Lodge of the Marches, that 
its members resolved not to initiate another candidate. At all 
events it seems that the Lodge deliberately put an end to its own 
existence, as, in a book containing its by-laws, an entry was made 
in the year 1864, apparently on the authority of Bro. G. 
Anderson, that it was dissolved on the 21st October, 1828. 
Bro. G. Anderson was a mem^ber of the Mercian Lodge, and he 
with three other members, namely — J. GriflBths, B. Urwick, and 
H. Whittall, was aUve in the year 1853. Through their instru- 
mentality, the warrant, jewels, and furniture of the Silurian and 
Mercian Lodges were preserved, but unfortunately their care did 
not extend to the records, which are entirely lost, with the excep- 
tion of the book of by-laws before referred to. This book contains 
nothing particularly worthy of notice, though it is justly prfeed 
by the members of the Lodge of the Marches, in whose possession 
it now is, as an heirloom of their Masonic predecessors in Ludlow. 



THE PROVINCE OF SHROPSHIRE. 87 

The last mentioned Lodge was founded in the year 1853, 
probably as a consequence of the great revival of the Craft 
experienced in this Province upon the appointment of Sir Watkin 
W. Wynn to the post of P.G.M., stimulated by the knowledge of 
the existence of the jewels and furniture of the old Lodges. 
These interesting relics of antiquity, now used by the Lodge of 
the Marches, are as follows — 3 chairs, 3 pedestals, 3 mauls, 
3 candlesticks, the collar jewels of the W.M., S.W., J.W., 
Treasurer, and Secretary, an old Master Mason's apron, printed 
from an engraved plate, and a large Past Master's Jewel set with 
brilliants, presented to Bro. J. B. Morris, of the Mercian Lodge, 
in 1815. In addition, the Lodge has been recently presented by 
the Rev. H. Brown with a handsome glass goblet, made for the 
Silurian Lodge in 1791. The name of the Lodge of the Marches 
is, of course, derived from the old name for those districts on the 
borders of Wales, of which Ludlow was the centre, where rapine 
and civil brawls between Welsh and English formerly held full 
sway. Its original number was 887, altered in 1863 to 611. 
The Golden Lion Hotel was its first home ; it was consecrated on 
the 13th of June, 1853, by Bro. Guise (262), Pro. G.C., in the 
presence of the P.G.M. and his Deputy the Rev. E. H. Dymock. 
The occasion was regarded by the whole town as an important 
function, as we read that the P.G.M. "arrived by special train 
amidst the firing of cannon, and the ringing of the bells of St. 
Laurence Church." One of the first acts of the brethren was to 
elect all members of the late Mercian Lodge members of their new 
Lodge, upon payment only of Grand Lodge fees. Whether these 
old members had anything to do with the foundation of the Lodge 
of the Marches cannot now be ascertained, but as a body they 
probably had not. Since its foundation this Lodge has continued 
to prosper, and now possesses more subscribing members than 
any Lodge in the Province ; it is honourably known for its large 
subscriptions to the cause of Charity, and for the success of its 
Mafeonic festivities. It has also, I imagine, succeeded in estab- 
lishing a record in this era of records, inasmuch as at the P.G. 
Lodge held in Ludlow in September of the present year (1891), 



88 FREEMASONRY IN 



no less than 31 of its members were present. It may, perhaps, 
not be out of place, if I here acknowledge, with the deepest grati- 
tude, the kindness of Bro. T. J. Salwey in allowing me to peruse 
and make extracts from his M.S. History of his Mother Lodge, 
which will, I sincerely hope, some day assume the more permanent 
form which it assuredly deserves. 

List of Masters. 

1853— J. Bach. 

1854— W. M. Beddoes. 

1855 — J. B. James. 

1856— J. B. James. 

1857— W. E. Curtis, P.P.G.S.D. 

1858— W. E. Curtis. 

1859— P. Newman, P.P.G.S. of W. 

I860— W. Jellicorse. 

1861— W. M. Beddoes. 

1862— W. M. Beddoes. 

1863— P. Newman, P.P.G.S. of W. 

1864— W. C. Johnson. 

1865— W. C. Johnson. 

1866— F. Cox, P.P.G. Steward. 

1867— W. Powell, P.P.G. Std. B. 

1868— J. M. KUvert, P.P.G. Steward. 

1869— E. J. Partridge. 

1870— W. Powell, P.P.G.Std. B. 

1871— F. Cox, P.P.G. Swd. B. 

1872— H. Jones. 

1873— Alfred Marston, P.P.G. Steward. 

1874— Alfred Marston. 

1875— J. Peacock. 

1876— C. J. Bowles. 

1877— J. P. Challoner. 

1878— J. Roberts, P.P.G.R. 

1879— T. Roberts. 

1880— R. Cross. 

1881— J. H. Williams, P.P.G.J.D. 

1882— W. Putman, P.P.G.S.D. 

1883— J E. Brooks, P.P.G.S.W. 

1884— W. Norton, P.P.G A. P. 

1885— Arthur Marston, P.P.G S D. 

1886— R. G. Venables, D.P.G.M. 

1887— R. G. Venables, P.A.G.D. of C. (Eng.) 

1888— W. E. Sharp, P.P.G.P. 

1889— R. McBean, P.P.G. Steward. 

1890— R. McBean, P G.P. 

1891— C. "W. Wicksted, P.G.S.W. 



THE PROVINCE OF SHEOPSHIRE. 



89 



GRAND LODGE REGISTER 



MEMBERS OF THE MERCIAN LODGE, LUDLOW, 526 

(erased 1832.) 



Date of 
Initiation, 



1805, Nov. 5th 

1806, Nov. 26tli 

1807, Nov. 10th 

1810, Nov. 6th 
1812, Dec. 15th 



1813 
1813, Jan. 12th 
1813, April 13th 
1813, June 8th 
1815, Jan. 24th 



1818, Dec. 



1820, June 24th 



Name. 

Morris, B. Jno. 
Wellings, Edward 
Lloyd, Henry 
Russell, Richard 
Griffiths, Thomas 
Acton, Samuel 
Anderson, George 
Rogers, Edward 
Urwick, Benjamin 
Davies, James 
Meyrick, Thomas 

Whittal, Henry 
Greenhouse, John 
Wakefield, Richard 
Whitney, William 
Thomas, John 
Wellings, Henry 
Wellings, Thomas 
Price, James 

Cooke, John 

Massey, Jonathan 
Bryan, William 
Bryan, Richard 

Dansey,Geo. Henry 

Harley, Edward 



Profession. 



Attorney 



1821, June 30th 
1821, Sept. 24th|22 



Residence. 
Ludlow 



Bookseller 

Glover 

Attorney 

Esquire 

Tanner 

Glover 

Dancing 

Master 
Druggist 
Currier 
Surgeon 
Innholder 
Currier 
Bank Clerk 
Woolstapler 
Mercer 

Farmer 

Gentleman 
Woolstapler 



Gentleman 
Lord 



Hay, Breck- 
nockshire 
Brampton 

Brian 
Ludlow 
Spode 
Long Road, 

Radnorshire 
Ludlow, from 

29, London 
Brampton 

Brian, from 

711, Oxford 
Ludlow 



26 Dansey, Ed. ColUns Lieut. R.N. 
[Griffiths, Thomas Stationer 

This Register was commenced in 1813 and does not contain 
some names that were entered in the earlier Register kept 
between 1805 and 1813. 



90 FREEMASONRY IN 



LODGE OF ST. JOHN, WELLINGTON, 60L 



After the extinction of the old Wrekin Lodge in 1798, 
the district around Wellington remained in a state of Masonic 
darkness till the year 1852. In that year the Lodge of St. John 
was established at Admaston, its founders being almost all mem- 
bers of one or other of the Shrewsbury Lodges. Its warrant is 
dated the 27th April, and the brethren mentioned therein are — 
J. W. Towers, H. Evett, Henry Lewis, Robert P. Weston, W. 
Patchett, William Field, and John Broughall. Reference has 
been already made to its consecration, and the installation of 
Bro. Towers as its first Master. In the minute book of the 
Lodge Bro. Goode is stated to have been the first to occupy the 
chair, and I cannot account for the discrepancy between this 
account and that given by the Provincial Grand Lodge Minute 
book. The contradictory statements are both precise and definite. 
As, however, the consecration of the Lodge was delayed by the 
non-arrival of the Warrant from May 17th, the day originally 
fixed, until June 16th, I think we may conclude that Bro. Goode 
was installed on the former and Bro. Towers on the latter date, 
the Provincial Grand Ofiicers being present on both occasions. 
The correctness of the appended list of past masters must depend 
in part on this conclusion being accurate. In 1857 owing to a 
dispute with the caterer, the Lodge was removed to Wellington, 
where it has ever since remained. In the early history of the 
Lodge two of its members were most conspicuously identified with 
its prosperity. I allude to Bros. T. C. Eyton and William 
Anslow. The former presented the Lodge with a Cairngorm 
Snuff Box, which is almost unique, the pebble being of almost 
abnormal size. The services of Bro. Anslow to the Lodge were 
considerable, amongst them I may mention that he acted as 
Installing Master for 10 successive years, from 18-57-1867. The 



THE PUOVINCE OF SHROPSIIIRB. 91 



brethren were not ungrateful for his eiforts, and, after his death, 
placed in the church of All Saints, Wellington, two memorial 
windows, one on each side of the chancel, in commemoration of 
their regard for him. These windows are of stained glass, bear- 
ing respectively life size figures of St. John the Baptist, and St. 
John the Evangelist. On the pedestal on which these figures 
are depicted as standing, the following words are placed in stained 
glass — " To the Glory of God, and in memory of William Anslow 
of Eyton." A brass plate at the foot of each window bears this 
inscription — " To the memory of WiUiam Anslow of Eyton this 
and the corresponding window on the other side of the Chancel 
were presented to the Parish Church by his brother Freemasons 
and other friends in affectionate remembrance, and as a token of 
their respect and esteem. Born 24th Octr. 1825, departed this 
life 23rd Octr., 1867." In later days Bro. Rowland Millington, 
who has now been Secretary of the Lodge for more than quarter 
of a century, has done good and useful work. Some years ago 
he was presented by the Lodge with an exceedingly handsome 
clock, as a token of gratitude. The Banner of the Lodge bears 
upon it an oil painting of St. John, copied from one of the 
memorial windows above mentioned — the silver letters and minia- 
ture working tools with which it is adorned, were the work of the 
donor, Bro. Roff King, during the year 1877 in which he filled 
the Chair. The Lodge is now one of the smallest in the Province, 
and it is a matter of regret, that the Brethren, inheriting as they 
do traditions of good work, should not seek more vigorously to 
inci'ease its strength. 

List op Masters. 
1852— B. W. Goode. 
1853— J. W. Towers, P.P.G. Swd. B. 
1854— T. C. Eyton, P.P.G.S.W. , 
1855— H. Evett, P.P.G.D. of C. 
1856— William Anslow, P.P.G. Swd. B. 
1857— Isaac Knowles, P.P.G.S.D. 
1858— K G, Belliss, P.P.G. Steward. 



^2 fREEllASOI^RY IJf 



1859— William Howlet. 

I860— J. Barber, P.P.G.D, of C. 

1861— T. C. Eyton, P.P.G.S.W. 

1862— W. B. Hayley, P.P.G.S. of W. 

1863 — John Hooper. 

1864— J. L. Randal, P.P.G.S.W. 

1865— Rowland Millington, P.P.G.J.D. 

1866— S. J. Fellows, P.P.G.D. of C. 

1867— A. R. Britton, P.P.G.S. 

1868— J. H. Slaney, P.P.G.A.D. of C. 

1869— E. Bagaley. 

1870— W. Dallow. 

1871— A. Taylor. 

1872— H. Shepard, P.P.G.J.D. 

1873-E. J. Webb, P.P.G.A.D. of C. 

1871— F. B. Higgison. 

1875 — R. J. Acton. 

1876— John Adams, P.P.G. Steward. 

1877— Roff King, P.P.G.S.W. 

1878— J. Brookes. 

1879— Rev. A. J. Von Straubenzee, P.P.G.C. 

1880— J. Greene. 

1881— J. R. Poole. 

1882— J. Millington, P.P.G. Swd. B. 

1883— W. T. Parkins. 

1881— J. Smith, P.P.G. Swd. B. 

1885— Rowland Millington, P.P.G.J.D. 

1886— E. R. Millington. 

1887— E. A. Hicks, P.P.G.R. 

1888— E. A. Hicks, P.P.G.R. 

1889— Roff King, P.P.G.S.W. 

1890— H. Shepard, P.P.G.J.D. 

1891— R. J. Acton. 



tHE Province op shuopshiue. 



93 



GRAND LODGE REGISTER 

OP THE 

WREKIN LODGE, WELLINTON, 445 (erased 1798.) 



Name. 


Age. 


Profession. 


Residence. 


When 
Initiated 


Henry Y. Carter 


30 


Surgeon 


Wellington 


5,1,1790 


John Ridding 


26 


Innkeeper 






)J 


Frederick Ridding 


21 


Gentleman 






18,1,90 


Thomas Webb 


24 


Innkeeper 






26,2,90 


William Webb 


38 


)) 






)) 


Richard D. Phillips 


22 


Attorney 






10,8,90 


George Collier 


21 


)j 






21,8,90 


Edmund Nash 


29 


)> 






27,9,90 


Thomas Jones 


21 


Surgeon 






)) 


Robert Meek 


21 


Mercer 






22,10,90 


WilHam Davis 


30 


Gentleman 






15,7,91 




94 FREEMASONllY IN 



THE EYTOX CHAPTER, WELLINGTON, 601. 



This Chapter was established soon after the foundation of 
the Lodge of St. John, its Charter being dated the 1st August, 
1855. It was at first composed almost entirely of members of 
that Lodge and of the Salopian Lodge; the latter of whom joined 
for the purpose of getting it into good working order. After the 
foundation of the Lodge of St. Milburga, 1120, its recruits were 
however largely drawn from Ironbridge. After the first few 
years of its existence it was for a considerable period somewhat 
irregular in its meetings. Blanks occur in its Minute books from 
October, 1861 to April, 1863 ; from January, 1866 to July, 1867 ; 
from January, 1868 to October, 1869; and from October, 1870 
to January, 1873. The list of its P.Z's is therefore for several 
years incomplete. During this period the Chapter was greatly 
indebted to the services of Companion Bristow, of Dudley, who 
filled the principal chair during the performance of nearly all the 
ceremonies. These services were suitably acknowledged by the 
presentation to Companion Bristow of a very valuable gold snuff 
box. From about the year 1877, however, the Chapter seems to 
have taken a fresh lease of life, and from that time its meetings 
have been regularly held, and its ceremonies carried through 
without any extraneous aasistance. It now numbers about 20 
subscribing members. 

P.Z's 

1855-6— G. Marriott. 
1856-7— W. Brightwelh 

1858 — T. C. Eyton. 

1859 — W. Anslow. 

1860 — R. G. Belliss. 



THE PROVINCE OP SHROPSHIRE. 95 

1861— J. L. Randal. 

1862— 

1863— 

1864— W. Anslow. 

1865— H. Evett. 

1866— W. B. Hayley. 

1867— 

1868— J. Barber. 

1869— 

1870— R. Millington. 

1871— 

1872— 

1873— R. Millington. 
1874— R. Millington. 

1875— J. Barber. 

1876— J. H. Slaney. 

1877— H. Shepard. 

1878 — J. Bodenham. 

1879— R. Anslow. 

1880— R. Jackson. 

1881— Roff King. 

1882— Sir C. B. H. Soame, Bart. 

1883 — Rev. A. J. Von Straubenzee. 

1884— J. C. W. Lister. 

1885- W. T. Parkins. 

18S6 — J. Smart. 

1887— E. A. Hicks, 

1888— T. Machin. 

1889— H. Shepard. 

1890— J. C. W. Lister. 

1891— T. C. Bird. 



96 FREEMASONRY IN 



THE SALOPIAN LODGE OF CHARITY, 117. 



On. February Sth, 1768, a Warrant was granted by the 
"Atholl" or "Ancient" Grand Lodge, for the formation of a 
Lodge numbered 153 in the 13th Regiment of Foot. No returns 
were made from this Lodge to Grand Lodge after 1776, and it 
then, doubtless, became extinct. In the year 1809 a meeting of 
several brethren in the Regiment of the Shropshire Militia, then 
stationed at Eastbourne, was held for the purpose of establishing 
a Lodge in that Regiment. A Warrant was eventually granted 
on March 22nd, 1810, by the "Ancient" Grand Lodge, the 
number given to the new Lodge (153) being that of the extinct 
Lodge in the 13th Regiment. Upon this identity of numbers 
has been founded the theory that there was some connection 
between the old and the new Lodge, and that the latter was in 
someway the continuation of the former. No such connection, in 
my opinion, ever existed; at all events it certainly cannot be 
proved. The fact appears to be that this grant of an old Lodge 
number to a new Lodge, is only another instance of the various 
devices invented by both the rival Grand Lodges to evade the 
provisions of the Act directed against Secret Societies. In my 
outline of the history of the Lodge of the Marches, 611,1 have 
pointed out the scope of that statute, and have shown that a 
transfer by endorsement of the Warrant of a defunct Lodge, was 
one of these devices. In the case under consideration we see 
another artifice which was sometimes adopted, viz., the grant of 
a new Warrant bearing an old number, "the latent (!) powers of 
extinct Lodges being revived for entirely new and distinct 
organizations."(i) A study of the Warrant granted as above 
mentioned, and of the minute books of the Lodge then created, 
shows that they contain not the slightest reference to the older 

(1) Lane's Handy Book to the List of Lodges, p. 113. 



THE PROVINCE OF SHROPSHIRE. 97 



Military Body, on the contrary they are in themselves suflScient 
evidence of the creation of an absolutely new Lodge. As a proof 
of my statement in this respect I here give the first entry in the 
minute book verbatim. 

"East Bourne, 2nd Oct., 1809. 
At A Friendly Meeting of Brothers of Ancient Free-Masonry— 
The Following Brothers signed their Names "With the following 
sums Opposite Each, and agree to Meet Once a Fortnight from 
this Date to subscribe Each Regularly to raise a sum 

sufficient to Obtain a warrant to hold a Lodge in the Shropshire 
Regiment of Militia, viz." — (Here follows the names of 20 
brethren, with various sums after their names) 
I may add that the fact that No. 153, the old Military Lodge in 
13th Regt., was continued on the Roll of the Atholl Grand 
Lodge until the present century, is no proof of the continued 
existence of the Lodge beyond the period of its last return in 
1776. Numerous instances could be quoted of Lodges, undoubt- 
edly defunct, whose numbers were similarly retained on the roll. 
Grand Lodge supervision was in former days far from being close 
or exhaustive. In the year 1811 the Lodge had a seal engraved 
with this motto round it — "The Salopian Lodge of Charity." — 
This name it has ever since retained. In the year 1813, after 
the Union, its number was changed to 186, and it then passed 
under the same Grand Lodge jurisdiction as the Salopian Lodge 
262. In the history of the latter Lodge I have shown the 
method in which the numbers on the Registers of the respective 
Grand Lodges were dealt with at the Union. I need here only 
remark that the precedence on the roll of its own Grand Lodge 
gained by the Salopian Lodge of Charity in 1810, by the grant 
of a low number to which it was not entitled by its age, was in 
1814 preserved and continued on the roll of the United Grand 
Lodge, and it is now 145 places higher than 262, though 22 years 
junior tothat Lodge. In the Constitutions for 1734 it is laid 
down that " The Precedency of Lodges is grounded on the 
Seniority of their Constitution." That equitable principle is 
violated in the case of 117 and 262, as well as in numerous 

M 



98 



FEEEMASONET IN 



instances elsewhere throughout the kingdom. Nothing but the 
extreme exigencies of the case at the beginning of the present 
century, through parliamentary interference, could have justified 
such unfairness to the older Lodges: In the Province, however, 
the age of a Lodge as recorded in the books of the Province, and 
not its number, gives precedence, and so in the roll of Provincial 
Lodges the Salopian Lodge of Charity ranks after 262, as the 
second senior Lodge. Between the years 1810-15 the Lodge 
followed the Regiment in which it was founded, and records of 
meetings in Gosport, Stonehouse, Ennis, Limerick, and Dublin 
still exist. One effect of this visit of the Lodge to Ireland was 
that the members became infected with a leaning towards 
Knights' Templarism, then much in vogue amongst our Irish 
Military brethren. " This order, then known as ' Black Masonry,' 
was propagated, to a large extent, through Charters issued by 
the ' High Knights' Templars of Ireland,' — a body of Freemasons 
in Dublin, who were constituted by Mother Kilwinning (Scotland) 
in 1779, for the practice of the Craft Degrees."'^) In 1813 
application was made to the Mother Lodge to authorize the 
transfer of a ' Black "Warrant ' from Knights of the Temple and 
of Malta, in the Westmeath Militia, to brethren in the same 
degree serving in the Shropshire Militia. But the Lodge of 
Kilwinning (Scotland), in reply to the ' Sir Knights ' of the 
latter regiment, repudiated the existence of any maternal tie 
between herself and any Society of Masonic Knighthood, and 
confessed her inability to ' communicate upon Mason business 
farther than the Three Steps.' The minute books do not contain 
the slightest allusion to this application, or to the Order referred 
to, and it is probable that the return of the Lodge to England 
speedily banished all desire for further information in this . 
direction. 

After its wanderings the Lodge finally settled down in 
Shi'ewsbury in 1815, doubtless owing to the disembodiment of 

(1) Gould's History, vol. iii., p. 44 and note. 

Lyon History of Mother Kilwinning (Freemasons Magazine, Felj. IGth, 
1805, p. 114. 



THE PEOVINCE OP SHROPSIIIUE. 99 



tiie Militia after Waterloo, and the consequent return of its 
jnembers to their native county. Between 1816-1819 it continued 
the practice, persisted in siiy;e its constitution, of initiating 
civilians. Being a Military Lodge, such a practice was distinctly 
illegal, and drew upon the Lodge the scrutiny of Grand Lodge, (i) 
The offence was forgiven in due course, and in 1820 (June 23) 
the Lodge exchanged its Military Warrant for a civil one. 

The minutes from April Uth, 1819 to January 27th, 1830 
are missing, but the Register of Initiations during that period 
is still in existence, and Grand Lodge records show beyond all 
doubt that the Lodge continued working as usual. In 1832 its 
number, 186, was at the general re-numbering of the Lodges 
altered to 135. 

The practice of " Passing the Chair," which is explained 
in the Salopian Lodge History '2) was frequently adopted by the 
Salopian Lodge of Charity. At the Union it was declared to be 
no longer necessary as a preliminary to exaltation in the Royal 
Arch, but an instance occurs in this Lodge so late as 27th 
December, 1836, upon which occasion "Bros. Drinkwater, Owen, 
and Pool passed the Chair," and paid a fee of 5/- for doing so. 
This persistence in an old custom, affords an excellent example of 
the conservative tendencies of the members of a Lodge, unwilling 
to abandon practices, however unnecessary, which had been in 
vogue amongst their Masonic Ancestors. It is doubtful whether 
or not these brethren " passed the chair " for the purpose of 
being exalted ; most probably they did not. The only Chapter 
then in the Province was one in connection with the Lodge of 
Industry in Bridgnorth, of which they are not registered as 
members in Grand Chapter. The members of 135 were, 
however, clearly aware of its existence, and sometimes availed 
themselves of the opportunities that existence afforded them, as 
may be seen from the following minute — " Monday, Jan. 6th, 
1834, A commitey assembled at Bro. Curton's (?Cureton) con- 

(1) See Salopian Lodge History for year 1819. 

(3) See year 1780 ; where the nature o£ the ceremony is indicated. 



100 I'REEMASOifRY IN 



cerning some brothers going to Bridgnorth to be exalted, the 
Brethren pressant agread that our W. Master Dodd should be 
Lent £i from the fund of the Lodge and to Pay it back When 
Called for." Bros. Dodd and Powis, the latter of whom was also 
a member of 135, were exalted together on Feb. 12th in the same 
year, and their names are registered in Grand Chapter. There 
is no other mention of the Boyal Arch in the minute books, and 
the Lodge seems to have taken no part in the foundation of the 
present Chapter in Shrewsbury, attached to 262 in the year 184.3. 
The next event worthy of note was the amalgamation of the 
Lodge with 262, in the year 1851. This subject has been treated 
fully in connection with the latter Lodge, and need not here be 
further considered. 

On Nov. 6th, 1862, a Lodge of Instruction was established 
under the auspices and direction of the Lodge. Its founders 
were Thomas Phillips, W.M., 135, Bryce Smith, 135, Edward 
Burd, J.W., 135-328, William Stanway, S.W., 135-328, Richard 
Lewis, P.M., 135, Richard Nicchols, W.M., 328. Of these Bros. 
Bryce Smith, E. Burd, and Richard Lewis, of Wrexham, are 
still alive. It was originally called the Wyrmstay Lodge of 
Instruction — Wynnstay being the residence of the R.W.P.G.M. 
This word was dropped from the title of the Lodge in the year 
1887, shortly after the division of the Province. The Lodge is 
now available for both the Shrewsbury Lodges, but still remains 
entirely under the management of 117. The W.M.'s of the 
two Lodges generally take the chair on alternate days of meeting 
and rehearse the ceremonies to be performed in their respective 
Lodges. A series of able and diligent Directors of Ceremonies 
have kept the working of the Lodge at a high state of perfection, 
and its influence has been most marked in promoting the efficiency 
of Lodge ceremonial in Shrewsbury. Bro. T. P. Deakin, P.M. is 
the present D. of C, and in his hands the Lodge traditions of 
careful and accurate work are fully maintained. It would be 
a matter of congratulation if his views as to the Lodge beinw one 
of Instruction rather than of Rehearsal could in the future 



*HE PEOVlNCE OF SHROPSHIRE. lOl 

obtain the practical expression which they undoubtedly deserve. 
The number 135 was changed to 117 in 1863, since which date 
no re-numbering of the Lodges has taken place. Shropshire 
Masons will cordially admit, that the Salopian Lodge of Charity 
has always taken its proper place in all that concerns the Craft 
in the Province ; it has for years been in a most flourishing state, 
and now possesses about 45 subscribing members. Not the 
least of its good works has been the foundation of the Whit- 
church Lodge in 1889, thus reflecting back, as it were, the 
" Light,'' which, just a century before, had shone from that town 
to illuminate the darkness of Shrewsbury. 

List of Masters. 

1810 — James Mansfield. 

I James Mansfield. 
181W Thomas Baugh. 
( John Cheese. 

1812— John Cheese. 

1813— John Price. 

1814— John Dibbin. 

1815— John Dibbin. 

isifi i Robert Taylor. 
^°^° ( Richard Pritchard. 

, „, Y ( Richard Pritchard. 
I James Mansfield. 

1818 — James Mansfield. 

1819 — James Mansfield. 

1820-1829— No Records. 

1830— Patrick Kean. 

1831— Richard C. Hughes. 

1832— James Mansfield. 

1833— William Dodd. 

1834— William Dodd. 

1835 — John Humphreys. 

1836— Samuel Lea. 

1837 — Samuel Lea. 

1 838 —Evan Owen. 



102 FKEEIIASONEY IN 



1839— Evan Owen. 

1810— George Maxon. 

1841 — Richard P. Drink water. 

1812 — Joseph Sharrod. 

184-3 — George Maxon. 

1844— Thomas Onions, P.P.G.R. 

1845— Thomas Onions, P.P.G.R. 

1846 — George Maxon. 

1847 — Richard P. Drinkwater (never acted). 

1848— Thomas Onions, P.P.G.R. 

1849— John Leohe Rowland, P.P.G.S.W. 

1850— John Watton. 

1851— John Nigel Heathcote, P.P.G.J.W. 

1852 — John Leche Rowland ? (No record, being year of 
amalgamation.) 

1853— William Patchett, P.P.G.S. of W. 

1854— Thomas Onions, P.P.G.R. 

1855— Joshua Pugh White, P.P.G.S.W. 

1856— James R. Pickering, P.P.G.P. 

1857— Joshua Pugh White, P.P.G.S.W. 

1858— Henry Atkin, P.P.G.P. 

1859- Richard Lewis, P.P.G. Std. B. 

1860— Richard Lewis, P.P.G. Std. B. 

1861— John Lawrence Randal, P.P.G.S.W. 

1862— Thomas Phillips. 

1863— William Stanway, P.P.G.P. 

1864— Edward Burd, P.P.G.A.D. of C. 

1865— Bryce Smith, P.P.G.J.D. 

1866— Charles Fleet. 

1867— Francis Fletcher, P.P.G.D. of C. 

1868 -Edward H. Hankey, P.P.G.R. 

1869— John Evans. 

1870 — Joseph Cresswell. 

1871— Philip H. -Evans, P.P.G.A.D. of C. 

1872— Horatio M. Jones. 

1873— Edward H. Hankey, P.P.G.R. 



THE PROVINCE OE SHROPSHIRE. 103 

1874— John Bishop Boucher, P.P.G.O. 

1875— John Briscoe Bagnall, P.P.G. Swd. B. 

1876— John Briscoe Bagnall, P.P.G. Swd. B. 

1877— William Spraggon, P.P.G. A.D. of C. 

1878— William B. Morris. 

1879— Thomas Warren Thompson, P.P.G.D. of C. 

1880— William E. Litt. 

1881— Vincent Corbet Legh Crump, P.G. Treas. 

1882— James Vine, P.P.G.S. of W. 

1883— John Blockley, P.P.G.S. of W. 

1881: — Thomas Pidduck Deakin, P.G. Assistant Sec. 

1885— Thomas Challoner Royle, P.P.G. Swd. B. 

1886— William Belton, P.P.G.S.D. 

1887— A. Silver Townsend, P.P.G.S. of W. 

1888— Herbert Major, P.P.G.A.D. of 0. 

1889— Alfred B. Deakin, P.P.G. Swd. B. 

1890— William Adams, P.G.A.D. of C. 

1891 — Benjamin Blower, P.G. Steward. 

1892— William Baxter. 

I have done my best to render this list accurate, but, 
owing to minute book irregularities, I cannot guarantee the 
absolute correctness of some of the earlier names. 




104 FREEMASONRY IN 



HISTORY OF THE SALOPIAN LODGE, 262. 



Section I. (1788—1813). 

The Salopian Lodge can only claim to have attained an 
eminently respectable age. Nothing in connection with its 
history is a matter of speculation, as is so often the case with 
respect to Lodges boasting of their antiquity. Its origin, con- 
stitution, and progress are faithfully recorded in its own minute 
books, which have, except for one short period of five years, been, 
in the main, carefully kept since the date of its foundation, and 
form the chief source from which my information has been 
derived. I propose to let these minute books, as far as possible, 
tell their own story, and for that purpose copious extracts from 
them will be given, such explanations and additions only being 
inserted as will make them intelligible. I have also thought it 
best to place these extracts in proper chronological order, so that 
a glance at the margin of each page will show the year to which 
my remarks are intended to apply. 

The Warrant of the Lodge, of which an exact copy 
1788. is given in Appendix A, is dated the 13th day of May, 
1788. It constituted certain brethren, namely, William 
Neale, Thomas Barkley, William Cottom, John Beck, John 
Brackley Prichard, John Hall, and other brethren residing in or 
near the town of Shrewsbury, into a regular Lodge, under the 
title of the Salopian Lodge, No. 1, to be opened at a House 
known by the sign of the Fox. William Neale was appointed 
W.M , Thomas Barkley, S.W., and William Cottom, J.W. The 
Rev. Francis Henry Egerton was then P.G.M. for Shropshire, 
Major Charles Shirreff being his Deputy, and it was the latter 
who procured the Warrant for the Lodge. It will be noticed 
from a perusal of the Warrant that it was issued by the authority 



THE PROVINCE OP SHROPSHIRE. 105 

of the P.G.M., though never actually signed by him, 
and the Salopian Lodge, like many others, especially in 1788. 
Yorkshire, has never possessed any full Warrant from 
Grand Lodge. Bro. John Beck was a Banker and Wine Mer- 
chant, and Bro. Cottom was Landlord of the Trumpet' Inn, liut 
with these two exceptions nothing certain appears to be known 
of the founders, their history, or occupations. Various conjectures 
will however be found opposite their names in the full list of 
members contained in Appendix D, such conjectures having been 
made in the manner hereafter indicated. 

The minute of the Urst recorded Lodge runs as follows : — • 
" By virtue of a Dispensation from the P.G.M. for 
Shropshire, A Lodge of Free and accepted Masons was 
held at the Fox Inn, in Shrewsbury, 3rd July, 1788. 
Peesekt. 
William Neale, Master. 
Thomas Barkley, Senior Warden. 
WilHam Cottom, Junior Warden. 
John Beck, Treasurer. 
John Brackley Prichard, Secretary. 
John Hall, Senior Deacon. 
Edward Innys, Junior Deacon. 
Michael Kavanah, Tyler. 
Membep.s. 
Alexander Keate 
Visitors. 
Bro. Fitzsimmons, Master; Bro. Thornton, & Bro. Cockburn, 
Officers ; & Bro. Narcesso; Members of Barry Lodge. Bro. John 
Gellion from Chester, & Bro. William Cartwright. 
Proceedings. 
Bro. E. T. Smith was raised to the Sublime Degree of 
Master Mason. 

Resolved — That a Code of Bye Laws be prepared for the 
good Rule and Government of this Lodge." 

This resolution was speedily carried into effect, as a code 

N 



106 PREEMASONET IN 



of by-laws was submitted to the Lodge on August 20th, 
1788. and being then approved of, they were ordered to be 

copied in the Minute Book, and signed by the Members. 
On an examination of the names appended in pursuance of this 
order, it will be seen that many brethren must have disregarded 
it. Even the name of Bro. Smith who had just been raised, is 
conspicuous by its absence, but this is probably explained by the 
fact that he was in the Royal Navy, and evidently left Shrews- 
bury soon after he was raised, as his name never appears again 
in the minutes. A copy of these by-laws will be found in 
Appendix 0, and from them considerable knowledge of the 
managemsnt of the Lodge is derived. Its meetings were held at 
the Fox Inn, on the first Tuesday in every month in the year. 
In the winter months the Brethren met at 6 o'clock, and remained 
together till 9, whilst in the summer months these hours were 
8 and 10 respectively. It was specially forbidden that any 
brother should remain in the Lodge Room after 11 p.m., under 
a penalty of 2s. 6d. for each offence. The Officers, amongst 
whom it must be especially noticed were included Deacons, were 
elected on the lodge night preceding the Festival of St. John the 
Evangelist (Dec. 27th), upon which day they entered upon their 
respective offices. It is curious to note that the two Wardens 
were elected by the Lodge, and not chosen by the Master. On 
the other hand, the Master had the power of appointing Com- 
mittees to enquire into any necessary business, a power which has 
recently been thought to have lapsed by disuse. There is a 
delicate euphemism contained in the by-law which provides that 
the Master shall fine any brother who shall enter the Lodge 
disguised in liquor in the sum of one shilling and order him to 
depart the Lodge. No record exists of the Master being obliged 
to use the authority thus confided to his hands. The expense of 
holding a Lodge of Emergency was borne by the person for whose 
benefit it was called. Passings and raisings were intended to be 
performed only in such Lodges, and the candidates were liable 
for the necessary outlay. The election of members was by 
petition, followed by a proposal in open lodge, and an approval 



THE PROVINCE OF SHROPSHIRE. 107 

by ballot as at present. Unanimity was, however, nec- 
essary, as a single black bean was sufficient to exclude any 1788. 
proposed candidate. The fee payable on initiation was 
£2 15s. Od., which included 5s. for registration in Grand Lodge, 
2s. Gd. for the Lodge Secretary, and Is. 6d. for the Tyler. A 
further sum of half-a-guinea was payable on the performance of 
each of the ceremonies of passing and raising. From the Treasurer's 
accounts we find that for at least 5 years, the Hon. (?) Secretary 
received this fee of 2s. 6d. as a matter of course. The subscription 
of members was Is. a month for the funds of the Lodge, and Is. 6d. 
a night for refreshments ; these payments were collected monthly. 
Visitors were always required to pay the subscription of Is. 6d. 
for refreshments, and also the sum of Is. to the funds of the 
Lodge, unless they were subscribers to some other Lodge. This 
seems to the present generation of Masons a curious way of 
exercising that peculiarly Masonic Virtue Hospitality, but it is 
certain that the custom was then a widely diffused one, and not 
by any means confined to Shrewsbury. It may be partly explained 
by the fact that special invitations to visiting Brethren were in 
those days rare, the usual method of invitation being by advertise- 
ment in the local journals. It can be easily understood that 
Brethren accepting such an invitation might fairly be expected 
to pay their own expenses. In addition it may be remarked 
that the same visitor's name is often found recorded for several 
successive lodges, so that it would appear that the visitors were 
generally Masons who did not belong to any other Lodge, or 
who were detained in the town for some considerable length of 
time, and not brethren from a distance attending for one Lodge 
only. It seems only just that those of the former class should 
pay as much as regular subscribers, while those of the latter class 
were protected by a clause in the same by-law, which provided 
that a person visiting the Lodge should be admitted the first 
night free of expense. 

The account given by the Secretary of the formal Con- 
stitution of the Lodge, is contained in the minute of " a Lodge 



lOS FREEJIASOSTEY IN 



of Emergence held on the 10th Septr., 1788." It records 
1788. that "after dining together in perfect harmony the Dep- 
uty Provincial Grand (nic) produced and had read the 
Warrant for constituting this Lodge, he then installed Bro. Neal 
Worshipfull and the rest of his OiBcers. He delivered a most 
excellent charge upon the occasion, in which the duties of a Mason 
were forcibly expressed, and the beauties and utility of Masonry 
were finely exemplified and most judiciously explained." Another 
account of the same Ceremony is contained in the Shrewsbuz'y 
Chronicle of Sep. 19th, it is as follows — " We hear that last week 
the 'New Salopian Lodge of Free Masons was regularly constituted, 
and the oificers installed at the Pox Inn in this town, by Major 
Charles Shirreff, Deputy Provincial Grand Master for this 
County; when an excellent dinner was provided, and the afternoon 
spent with that sober hilarity, and with that edifying conversation 
which becomes and should always distinguish Pree and Accepted 
Masons from men of dissolute and disorderly manners."' 

Of Major Shirreff I have already said much in the 
previous part of this work in connection with the Province 
of Shropshire, but of his special influence upon the Salopian 
Lodge in particular, some further details must be given. 
I believe that his influence was mainly responsible for a some- 
what anomalous feature in the early history of the Lodge. 
Constituted, as it was, under the " Moderns," it appears to have 
at first regularly adopted as an ordinary part of its system, three 
of the features which mainly distinguished "Ancient" from 
"Modern" Lodges. These are (1) the appointment of Deacons 
(2) the regular Installation of the W.M., and (3) the careful 
observance of both the Festivals of St. John (in June and Dec- 
ember). Deacons were by no means unknown under the 
" Modern " Constitution ; a few lodges might be mentioned 
which possessed them in 1788, and in one instance they existed 
in a "Modern" Lodge as early as 173i. Nevertheless the 
recognized opinion of Masonic Writers seems to be that under 
the "Modern" system they were not deemed 6Sse)i<iaZ, whereas 



THK PnOVINCE OP SHROPSHIRE. 109 

in "Ancient " Lodges they were invariably appointed. 
The fact that by a resolution of the Lodge in 1788. 
the year 1791 the ofifice of Deacon was abolished, 
would seem to indicate a return to stricter conformity to 
the usages of "Modern" Lodges. With regard to the 
regular practice of Listallation, I may, without going deeply 
into the question, quote from Bro. Sadler's " Masonic 
Facts and Fictions" the following passage, (i) which refers to the 
year 1810 — "It is therefore perfectly clear,'' he says, "that the 
" Moderns " had, certainly for many years, dispensed with the 
ceremony of Installation, while their rivals had kept up the old 
custom in this respect, as will be seen by a reference to the 
extracts from their records." As there is ample evidence that 
the Salopian Lodge from its foundation until the year 1793 
observed this ceremony, I am, I think, justified in regarding the 
practice as a proof of the theory I am advocating. In the year 
1810, "The Special Lodge of Promulgation," created for "the 
purpose of ascertaining and promulgating the Ancient Land 
Marks of the Craft," passed a resolution " that it appears to this 
Lodge, that the Ceremony of Installation of Masters of Lodges 
is one of the two Landmarks of the Craft, and ought to be 
observed." From the date of this resolution, the Ceremony has 
been duly observed by all Lodges. A very similar remark may 
be. made about the observance of the Festivals, which were 
never regarded with as much veneration by the " Moderns " as 
by the " Ancients," or celebrated with the same punctiliousness. 
It is true such observance was not a necessary part of any form 
or ceremony, still its neglect by the " Moderns " was an innova- 
tion on established usage, which was never permitted by the 
Salopian Lodge. This whole question might be discussed at much 
greater length if space allowed, but I hope sufficient has been 
said to make my proposition clear, and also to show that the 
inference drawn by Bro. Sadler from a perusal of Shirreff's letters, 
that he never became "Modernized" in his old age, can be more 
fully established by a perusal of the records of my own Lodge. 
(1) at page 101. 



110 



FEEEMASONEY IN 



The number of the Lodge in 1788 was 525. . The 
1788. Fox Inn was situate on the site of the building 

now known as the Working Men's Hall. It had 
a fine open courtyard in front of it, to which there were 
two ways of approach ; the one from Princess Street, the 
other from College Hill ; it had, however, no frontage on 
either of these streets. The Landlord was Bro. James Tre- 
hearn, who was initiated in 1788. He seems to have been an 
excellent caterer, as we find many votes of thanks passed to him 
by the Lodge. In permitting him to be a member, a breach of 
the Constitutions was made, for it was there provided that " ISTo 
Master of a public house or tavern shall be a member of any 
lodge held at his house."(i) 

The Lodge, having been formally constituted, lost no time 
in getting to work. In the first six months of its existence there 
are records of 22 lodges having been held, 9 of which are described 
as "Lodges of Emergence," and 14 initiations, and a total of 39 
ceremonies were performed. These figures go far to show that 
the Brethren spared no effort to increase the strength of the 
Lodge. Degenerate Shrewsbury Masons of the present day, un- 
accustomed to many ceremonies, would shrink from the prospect 
of a night's work such as our Masonic Ancestors often went 
through. Thus, on July 4th, there were three separate initia- 
tions ; on Septr. 8th, and again on Octr. 9th each of the three 
degrees was worked through ; on November 11th there were four 
initiations; and on Nov. 18th four passings and a raising took 
place. Rapidity was also a feature of the Lodge work in this 
year. Thus, three brethren, passed on Nov. 11th, were raised 
seven days afterwards. In the Book of Constitutions to which 
the Lodge was then subject, and which was published in 1784, 
there seems to be no express law upon the point, and a duplica- 
tion of ceremonies was not illegal, except in the case of making 
and raising, which, without a dispensation, could not be performed 
on the same evening upon the same candidate. In the 

U) Constitutions 1781 Art, ix., p. 388, 



THE PROVINCE OF SHROPSHIEB. Ill 

Constitutions of 1815, it was, however, provided, 
that no candidate should receive a degree at a 1788. 
less interval than one month from receiving a 
former degree. A rigid adherence to constitutions and by-laws 
was often forgotten in early times. For example, we read in a 
minute dated Sep. 11th, that "The Rev. George Holland was 
proposed a candidate for Masonry, and being approved, had the 
honour of being initiated by the Deputy Provincial Grand." If 
such a high official in the Graft as Bro. Shirreff could thus tacitly 
sanction the violation of the 20th by-law, which provided that 
the ballot was not to be taken till the lodge night next after that 
upon wliich the proposal was made, it is little wonder that the 
lesser officers should not have hesitated to follow his example. 
It may be, however, that in this particular instance the act of 
irregularity noted carried with it its own dispensation, as it was 
committed by the D.P.G.M., who could have given a dispensation 
if necessary. Though lax in some respects, in others Bro. Neale 
sufficiently upheld and vindicated the authority of the Chair ; 
on Nov. 4th, for instance, it is recorded that he fined two 
brethren for non-attendance. There is a curious entry under the 
same date which runs as follows — " This Evening much to the 
honour of the Worshipful Master and Senior Warden, the 
diflerence subsisting between them was finally settled." We are 
left in the dark as to the cause of this difference, and if and how 
far the Lodge acted as Mediator between the parties to it. 

On the Feast of St. John the Evangelist we find this 
entry — "Visited the Barry Lodge at Bro. Cottoms, when they 
returned and spent an hour with us." This visit was paid to the 
Trumpet Inn, and is an unique event in the Lodge history. It 
will be remembered that the Master and some of the brethren of 
the Barry Lodge were present at the opening meeting of the 
Salopian Lodge. The Barry Lodge could not be identified at first 
with any known Lodge, and considerable difficulty was experi- 
enced in accounting for its presence in Shrewsbury. However, 
on searching the files of the Shrewsbury Chronicle, the following 



112 



FREEMASONRY IN 



entry was found recorded on June 28th, 1789 — "On 
1788. Tuesday last, being the Anniversary of St. John the 

Baptist, a body of Freemasons in the 34th regiment 
(with a number of very respectable Brothers of this town) walked 
in solemn procession, attended by a band of music, from the 
Lodge room at the Trumpet Inn, Mardol, to St. Alkmund's 
Church.'' This at once indicated that the " Barry " was a Mil- 
itary Lodge in the 3-lth regiment, and as such it will be found 
recorded in the list contained in Bro. Gould's History of Free- 
masonry, (i) In addition to the giving and receiving of Hospit- 
ality, the Brethren also practised another great Masonic virtue, 
namely Charity. On Dec. 23rd we tind they voted three guineas 
for " the charitable purpose of buying coals for the poor of the 
town,'' and that sum was accordingly paid to the Mayor. 

It is noticeable that many candidates proposed and duly 
approved by ballot, never came forward for initiation. It must 
not therefore be supposed that the Lodge, even in its infancy, 
thankfully received the name of any candidate submitted for 
approval. In this year tvro candidates were rejected — One of 
these, Thomas Gray, Junr., was black beaned on June 11th, but 
apparently in no way discomfited by this rebuff, he succeeded in 
getting initiated in some other lodge, and on Oct. 25th was 
accepted by 525 as a joining Brother. From the Register in 
Grand Lodge it is evident that Bro. Gray was made in the Barry 
Lodge. Bros. T. Bassett and AY. Bourlay were also initiated in 
the same Lodge. 

The average attendance of members during the year was 
12, and the greatest number present on any occasion was 19. 
Very little information is to be found in the minute books as to 
the social position of the members, such details as are available 
have been inserted in Appendix D, which is a complete list of 
all the members since the foundation of the Lodge. In some 
jiistances the statements contained in tliis list are conjectural, 
being inserted in consequence of entries on the credit side of 

(1) vol. iii , p. 400. 



THE PROVINCE OP SHROPSHIRE. 113 

the Treasurer's account. As an example the name of 

Bro. S. Harwood may be cited. On December 2nd, 1788. 

1788, he appears to have been paid a bill of £1 3s. 6d. 

for stationery supplied to the Lodge, and he is accordingly 

described in the list as a stationer. This method of arriving 

at conclusions is obviously apt to lead to inaccuracy, and has 

been used very sparingly. In other instances the Grand Lodge 

Register gives us the only information we possess. 

The Treasurer's Account Book shows that the relief of 
distressed brethren was carefully looked after. Before the close 
of the year we find five distinct entries of sums paid out of the 
Lodge funds for that purpose. The W.M. appears to have made 
some of these payments on his own responsibility and in his own 
discretion, and afterwards to have recovered the sums paid from 
the Treasurer. The Lodge had then no Charity Representative. 
From the same book the following may be quoted : — 

Warrant from the P.G. Lodge ... 
Bible, Book of Constitutions, & Collars 
Bro. Hall for Covering a Bible and Hire 

of a Horse ... 
Liquor at the Constitution of the Lodge 
Bro. Barclay 1 doz. New Aprons 

In the History of the Province I have endeavoured to 
prove that there was no real P.G. Lodge at this time. Shirreff's 
letters show that this sum of £5 5s. Od. was duly transmitted to 
Grand Lodge. My readers must from the third entry draw 
their own conclusions as to Bro. Hall's social standing, I must 
confess I feel unable to assist them. He is stated in the minute 
book to have been a Draper. The aprons worn at this period 
consisted of a plain white lambs skin, and were provided by the 
Lodge for its members. At the close of the year the Lodge con- 
sisted of 32 members, of these the names of Loxdale and Lloyd are 
familiar to all Salopians, and Richard Dansey was the Great 
Grandfather of the present Sir Richard Dansey Green Price, Bart. 



£ 


s. 


d. 


5 


5 





4 


6 


6 





6 





7 


13 





1 


1 






114 



FREEMASONRY IN 



Bro. Neale was again elected W.M. in this year, and 
1789. the Lodge continued to grow in numbers, and to 

perform its work most energetically. In all 27 lodges 
were held, 9 of these being Lodges of Emergency; 15 initiations, 
and 38 ceremonies were performed. Many apparent irregularities 
may be noticed in the minute books. Thus it is recorded that 
William Evans, Wythen Evans, John Lewis, and "William Bowley 
were duly passed on various dates, although no record of their 
respective initiations was ever made ; similarly, no account is 
given of the passing of Richard Jenkins, although the Secretary 
notes both his initiation and raising. The Treasurer's books, 
however, shows that these apparent irregularities only appear 
through the defaults of the Secretary. All the proper fees were 
paid for the ceremonies omitted to be noticed by him, and there 
can be no doubt they were properly performed. Bro. Secretary, 
if somewhat negligent, was not allowed to go entirely unpunished, 
for he records on August 7th that he was fined for non-attend- 
ance, a similar fate having overtaken two other members earlier 
in the year. The Lodge at this time began its subscription of 
£5 5s. Od. per annum to the Salop Infirmary, an Institution 
which was founded about 174:5, and which was the second of its 
kind in England to begin the charitable work of relieving the 
sufferings of the poor, that at Winchester alone having a prior 
origin — a second subscription of the same amount was voted on 
December 28th, but it is evident that this was intended for the 
following year. The Treasurer gives the Lodge credit for the 
sum of £1 lis. 6d thus. — "Received from the Com'ittee Half 
the Amonnt of a Subscription for the Poor last winter." This 
return of money given in charity was, to say the least of it 
unusual, and it may be supposed that the distress which induced 
the Brethren to vote 3 guineas in the previous year must have 
been greatly exaggerated. The Shrewsbury Chronicle contains 
no traces of any special hardship or poverty existing at this 
period. In May it was proposed and agreed that " this Lodge 
attend the Provincial Grand Master at Whitchurch next St. 
John's Day, and that Major Shirreff be desired to acquaint him 



THE PROVINCE OP SIIEOPSIIIRE. 115 

with our intentions." No further notice is taken of 

the matter by the Secretary, the Treasurer, however, 1789. 

takes credit for the following payments : — 

June 23rd, Cleaning Sword for Wt'Ch. 3 

July 7th, Expense of Bro. Innys, and 

the Tyler to Wt'Ch 1 

from which we may conclude that the Lodge went to Whitchurch 
in Masonic State. Bro. Innys was in very reduced circumstances, 
which will account for this payment of his expenses. A consider- 
able sum of money was early in this year expended on the 
purchase of "jewills," and also in procuring glasses and 
decanters. A small quantity of the glass then bought is, I think, 
still in the possession of the Lodge ; at all events there is some 
in existence which has engraved upon it the No. 525, and, as the 
Lodge changed its number in 1792, the glass in question must be 
at least 100 years old. Three other entries in the Treasurer's 
books may here be noticed, they are : — 

March 17th — Lost by light money ... 2 

May 31st — Bro. Green for 6 pairs of 

gloves 12 

Septr. 1st — A box for a transparency 6 6 

From the second of these entries I conclude the Lodge provided 
the Brethren with gloves as well as aprons. I am not quite clear 
what the real functions of a transparency were, but Bro. Hughan 
in answer to my inquiries suggests that it was probably required 
for the 3rd degree, the star (lighted) being a great feature of that 
ceremony in years gone by. 

Merit seems to have been promptly recognised in olden 
times, as we find Bro. Warren became Secretary on the day he 
was passed. There can be little doubt that such an appointment 
could not do much to promote the efficient working of the Lodge 
affairs, and the recently adopted practice, at present followed in 
the Salopian Lodge, of only appointing a P.M. to that office, 
seems a sound and judicious one, 



116 FREEMASONRY IN 



It is apparent in this year, as in the previous one, that 
1789. many accepted candidates were never initiated, as we 

find the Secretary ordered to write to them threatening 
the forfeiture of their deposit money unless they appeared in due 
course. Major Shirreff in a passage in one of his letters which I 
have not previously quoted, suggests that the Candidates held 
back for fear of the " marking irons." How much of truth there 
was in the suggestion I cannot pretend to say. 

On December 2.3rd a Committee meeting was held to 
settle the arrangements for celebrating the Feast of St. John the 
Evangelist. The resolutions adopted by this Committee throw a 
good deal of light on the subject of the banquets then indulged 
in, and may be quoted in extenso without much comment. 

It was resolved — 

" That it is tlio opinion of this Comniittee tliat the sum of five shillings he 
paid by every Brother who shall attend on that day." 

" That every Absentie shall pay 2 shillings & CJ." 

" That Bro. Trehearn shall be ordered to provide a Dinner for Thirty at two 
shillings each, and that all Liquors be paid for besides, that the 
Dinner be directed to be ou the Table at 2 o'cdork." 

" That the Secretary be ordered to issue Summonses to all the Jlcmbers on 
the 24th giving nutice to meet at 12 o'clock in order that there may be 
time for the installation of the new OlBcers." 

" That the Steward be requested to attend early and collect the five shillings 
as each member arrives." 

"That an advertisement be inserted in the Shrewsbury paper that the 
Brethren of the Salopian Lodge intend to celebrate the Festival at the 
Fox ou Monday the 28th inst. recjuesting the Company of Yisiting 
Brethren." 

" That the Steward call for the Bill of the Dinner as soon as the Cloth shall 
be taken away, and pay for the Liquors as they are brought in, and 
inform the Master when the money collected for the day shall be 
uearly expended." 

The paper alluded to in these resolutions was the still 
floui-ishing Shrewsbury Chronicle, to which I have already 
referred. It was established in 1772, sixteen years before the 
Lodge came into existence. A Copy of the advertisement 
follows : — 



THE PUOVINCE OP SHROPSHIHE. 117 

" FREE MASONRY." 
Dec. 25th, 1789. "The Brethren of the Salopian 1789. 
Lodge meet to celebrate the Festival of St. John the 
Evangelist at Brother Trehearn's, the Fox Inn, at 12 o'clock on 
Monday the 28th day of December, when the Company of 
Visiting Brethren will be esteemed a favour.'' 

" Dinner on the table at 2 o'clock." 

No visitors seem to have responded to this invitation, but 
32 members of the Lodge attended. 

Once more the election of Bro. Neale as W.M. is 
recorded. It is, perhaps, needless to remark that the 1790. 
election of the same W.M. for three successive years is 
now forbidden by the Constitutions. The average attendance in 
this year exceeded 18, and work continued very plentiful, as a 
total of 28 ceremonies performed clearly shows. The Secretary 
again unjustly credits the Lodge with appai-ently irregular 
proceedings, but once more the accurate figures of the Treasurer's 
accounts correct the impressions gathered from a perusal of the 
minutes, and once more judgment followed hard upon the offence, 
as the Secretary was shortly afterwards again fined for non- 
attendance. That hard-working ofiicial apparently tried to get 
an Assistant Secretary appointed, but the Lodge reserved the 
question for future consideration, the opportunity for which, if it 
ever came, was not taken advantage of. 

An example of strictness is worthy of notice, especially as 
it would now hardly be followed as a precedent. I refer to the 
case of Bro Kyffin, who was black-beaned in October, but who 
was re-balloted for in November and then elected, the reason 
given being that "some members had voted on the previous 
occasion whose subscriptions were in arrears." 

By virtue of a Dispensation from the P.G.M. the Brethren 
took part in a great procession on the Festival of St. John the 



118 



FUEEMASONRY IN 



Baptist. The entry relative to this event is a very 
1790. important one, as it shows the strength of Masonry in 
the province at this date ; it is as follows ; — 
" The Festival of St. John the Baptist was celebrated on Tuesday, 
August, 31st, 1790. Present. 

Bro. Charles Shirreff, D.P.G.M. 
Officers & Brethren of the Whitchurch Lodge. 

Bro. Thomas Loxdale, Esqre., Master, (i) 
Officers and Brethren of the Salopian Lodge. 

Bro. John Hill, Esqre., Master. 
Officers & Brethren of the Egerton Lodge. 

Bro. Collier, Master. 

Officers & Brethren of the Wrekin Lodge. 

Bro. Grant, Master of 314. 

Bro. Geo. Collier, P.G. Chaplain. 

and many other Visiting Brethren. 
The Lodges proceded from the Lodge Room at 1 1 o'clock 
in procession to St. Mary's Church, where after hearing Divine 
Service and a Sermon on the occasion, they returned to the Town 
Hall to dinner, and the evening was spent in Harmony and 
Conviviality." 

The intention to hold this procession was advertised in the 
Chronicle in the following terms : — 
Aug. 20th. " FREE MASONRY." 

"A dispensation having been granted by the P.G.M. for 
the County of Salop to the Salopian Lodge for celebrating the 
past festival of St. John the Baptist on Tuesday, the 31st 
August, the brethren of the different Lodges in the County are 
desired to attend the D. P.G.M. at the Lodge Room at JO o'clock 
in the morning, from thence to walk in procession to St. Mary's 
Church, attended by the Provincial Grand Chaplain, and after- 
wards to dine at the Town Hall when the Company of every 
visiting brother will be highly esteemed. 

By order of the P.G.M., 
CHARLES SHIRREFF, D.F.G .M." 

(1) Bro. Neale had just resigdecl. 



THE PROVINCE OF SHROPSHIRE. 119 

The account given by the same paper in its issue of 
September 3rd is : — " On Tuesday last a very numerous 1790. 
and respectable body of Free and Accepted Masons 
belonging to the Provincial Egerton Salopian and Wellington 
Lodges of this County, assembled at the Fox Inn at this town, 
from whence they went in procession in their respective uniforms, 
adorned with the jewels and insignia of the order, preceded by a 
band of Music to St. Mary's Church." The banquet, we further 
learn from the same source, was conducted with " that harmony 
and decorum which always adorn the character of Masons.'' 

In the Provincial History I have already indicated the 
importance of a comparison of these accounts. I may, perhaps, 
repeat here the conclusions at which I then arrived. These are 
1st — that this was not a meeting of a Provincial Grand Lodge, 
and 2ndly — that the Whitchurch Lodge No. 1 was in common 
estimation regarded as a Provincial Grand Lodge, and that in 
fact no real Provincial Grand Lodge was then in existence. No. 
344 was not a Shropshire Lodge ; at this date 344 on the English 
Register was the Merchants Lodge, hailing from Liverpool. 
Bro. Grant was probably only a casual visitor. It is curious that 
Bro. Sadler, who kindly made the requisite search for me in 
Grand Lodge, cannot find the name of Grant on the register of 
the members of the Merchants Lodge. It may, therefore, be 
that 344 was some Lodge on the Irish or Scotch Register, and 
not an English Lodge at all. The procession was evidently 
carried out with considerable pomp, as the Treasurer paid 
£3 18s. 6d. for the band alone. The sermon preached by Bro. 
Collier was greatly appreciated, and he was invited by the Lodge 
to get it printed, or else favour them with a copy for that pur- 
pose. Eventually, as we shall see later on, he acceeded to this 
request. 

I have already noticed the resignation of Bro. Neale. He 
was undoubtedly a good and enthusiastic, if somewhat quarrel- 
some Mason. The Minute referring to his resignation of office 
reads thus—" After an elegant address from the Right Worshipul 



120 



FREEMASONRY IX 



Master, he resigned the Chair, which he had filled with 
1790. so much honour and credit to himself and profit to the 
Lodge, and appointed and installed Bro. Loxdale 
Master, instituted Bro. Lloyd into the office of Senior Warden, 
and proper charges were given on the occasion." That his ability 
and industry were considerable is evident by the progress the 
Lodge had made under his fostering care ; and that his efforts 
were appreciated by the Lodge is seen from a minute dated May 
10th, which records that "After a most excellent charge delivered 
by the Right Worshipful Master to Bros. R. Jones and Rowley, 
who had been raised to the sublime degree of Master Masons last 
lodge night, he gave an extraordinary fine lecture on the 3rd 
degree of Masonry, and afterwards one on the first, when the 
Lodge was closed in Peace and Harmony." 

On October 5th the Lodge Room was put in mourning for 
the late Grand Master, H.R.H. the Duke of Cumberland. A 
hatchment was ordered to be prepared, and inquiries were 
addressed to the P.G.M., "asking if it was necessary to observe 
any particular ceremony on the occasion." 

A curious event took place on December 27th — On that 
day Rro. Loxdale resigned the Chair, and Bro. Barkley was 
elected unanimously in his place, and was duly installed ; he then 
immediately resigned office, and Bro. Loxdale was re-elected 
Master, and was installed in proper ionn. This is the only 
instance of ' Passing the Chair,' viz. of obtaining the rank of 
P.M. without having served the office of W.M., recorded in the 
annals of the Lodge. The rank of Installed Master, then 
regarded as a degree, was considered to be a necessary qualifica- 
tion for exaltation in the Royal Arch, and the fiction of ' Passing 
the Chair ' was invented to enable an ordinary Master Mason to 
be exalted before he had presided over a Lodge as Master. The 
use of this fiction was at the date of the Union in 1813 declared 
to be no longer necessary, and any Master Mason can now be 
exalted. The custom, however, in some Lodges continued until a 



THE PROVINCE OP SHEOPSHIRE. 121 

much later period. "In Nos. 37 and 42 it lasted until 

1846 and 1850 respectively."(i) I have found no trace 1790, 

of the Royal Arch being worked in Shrewsbury before 

the year 1797, and I therefore conclude that Bro. Barkley must, 

unless he was receiving a mere honorary degree, have passed the 

Chair with a view to exaltation in some other part of England. 

In the minute books of 117 many instances of several Brethren 

' Passing the Chair ' on the same evening may be found, but this 

was at a time 20 years later than the period of which I am 

writing. 

The initial impetus now began to lose its force. 
Only 16 lodges were held during the year ; the average 1791. 
attendance was lowered to 15, and the number of 
ceremonies to 9. Considerable pecuniary difficulty was also felt, 
and in consequence the subscription to the Salop Infirmary was 
reduced to 3 guineas, and an application for aid from the 
Humane Society was refused. Subscriptions in arrear were 
closely looked after, suppers were discontinued for five nights, and 
strict economy generally enforced. These measures were success- 
ful, and at the end of the year, notwithstanding considerable 
outlay on distressed Brethren, the Treasurer had a balance of 
£12 17s. lOd. in his hands. On Feb. 1st., a Quarterly Commun- 
ication was received notifying the election of H.R.H. George, 
Prince of Wales, afterwards George IV., to the office of Grand 
Master; he had been initiated in 1787. It is curious to note 
how the words " Quarterly Communication " early changed their 
meaning. Originally they implied that personal communication 
or intercourse which the Masters and Wardens of the Lodge were 
expected to keep up with the officers of Grand Lodge, and the 
quarterly meetings of Grand Lodge were called Quarterly Com- 
munications.W In 1791 we see that the words had come to 
mean the quarterly letter from Grand Lodge to the Lodges 
subordinate to it. 

(1) Gould's History o£ Freemasonry, vol. ii., p. 460. 

(2) Book of Constitutions 1781 at p. 200. 



122 FEEEMASOXEY IN 



rrom the Minutes of Feb. 1st and March 1st we find 
1791. that Bro. Collier was anxious about the proceeds of the 

sale of his Sermon, preached in the previous year, and 
which had been printed by the Lodge. The Secretary was 
accordingly " ordered to make out an account of the Sermons sold 
and remit the money due.'' This is only one instance amongst 
many which might be quoted from the records, of the eagerness 
with which the Brethren purchased printed Sermons. Our tastes at 
the present day diifer somewhat from those of by-gone generations. 
Two other entries on March 1st are worth noting. The 
first records a resolution " that the Lodge will not take upon 
them to decide upon the misunderstanding which arose between 
Bros. Neale and Hall, and that the Secretary write to Bro Hall 
to attend as usual." This, Bro. Hall, with true Masonic Spirit, at 
first refused to do, as his enmity still existed. However, the 
matter was ultimately disposed of, for on August 2nd we find it 
" Resolved that Bro. Hall be excused paying his arrears for the 
past six months, his absence being occasioned by a disagreement 
between him and another worthy Brother, which is now amicably 
settled." The other entry referred to is as follows : — " Resolved 
that in future the Lodge be formed with the Wardens in the 
West, agreeable to the usage of the Grand Lodge — that the Office 
of Deacon be abolished and Stewards appointed in their stead." 
Upon this it may be remarked that the Lodge was misinformed 
as to the proper position of the Wardens. At this time Grand 
Lodge followed the usage of the present day, though at a much 
earlier date I believe the Wardens were found in the West. "In 
different rites the positions of these officers vary. In the York 
and American rites, the Senior Warden sits in the West and the 
Junior in the South. In the French and Scottish rites, both 
Wardens sit in the West, the Senior in the North West and the 
Junior in the South West."(i) This latter position is that shown 
upon an old Apron found in Ireland, which is described by Bro. 
D. R. Clark, F.S. A. in the Journal of the Quatuor Coronatorum.(-) 

(1) Mackey's Encyclopcedia. 

(2) Tol. iv., part 1, p. 56. 



THE PUOVINCE OE SIIUOPSIIIRE. 123 

The abolition of Deacons, when once established 
as regular Lodge officers, is very curious. Bro. Shirreff's 1791. 
views upon the change would be most intei'esting, if we 
could ascertain what they were. I have already suggested that 
it was probably a re-action towards " Modern " customs, caused 
by his excessive tendencies in favour of " Ancient " usages. 

In this year we first liear of a Lodge of Instruction 
established in connection with the Lodge. It obtained the use 
of the old lodge jewels for its meetings, which were held every 
Tuesday Evening at the Trumpet Inn. I do not think it 
existed for any great length of time, as it is never mentioned 
again, and the minutes from time to time make it perfectly clear 
that this was only the first of a long series of attempts to establish 
such an institution. 

Bro. Neale appears to have left Shrewsbury about this 
time, as we find the Lodge recommending him to the notice of 
Sir Robert Cotton, P.G M. for Cheshire, in whose neighbourhood 
he went to reside. His name is never again mentioned. by the 
Secretary, but his change of residence does not seem to have 
brought him prosperity, for I find shortly afterwards, from the 
columns of the Shrewsbury Chronicle, that he became bankrupt. 

On December 6th a letter was read in Lodge from " the 
author of Freemasonry for the Ladies." •ft would be interesting 
to see the work in question, but the Lodge apparently did not 
think so, as it refused to purchase a copy. There can be little 
doubt, I think, that the full title of the work in question was, 
" The Use and Abuse of Freemasonry ; a Work of the greatest 
utihty to the Brethren of the Society, to mankind in general, 
and to the Ladies in Particular." The author was Captain 
George Smith, who in 1783 failed to obtain the sanction of Grand 
Lodge for its publication.(i) 

A present of some candles to the Lodge by Bro. Beck may 
be noted, as also of a crane by Bro. Taylor. Candles, then the only 
illuminants, formed a very heavy item in the Lodge expenditure. 



(1) Gouia, vol. ii., p. 470. 



124 FKEEMASONEY IN 



In October the thanks of the Lodge were ordered to be 

1791. sent to "Bro. Sketchley, of Birmingham, for his polite 
attention to them in sending the acct. of the late Grand 

procession at Hereford." The Lodge there was called the 
Palladium, and still exists, its number being 120. It was 
founded in 1762. I have no details of the Grand Procession to 
supply ; but " Bro. Sketchley " was, I think, Bro. Schichley, who 
in the year 1791 struck, in Birmingham, a Masonic token to 
celebrate the election of H.R.H. the Prince of Wales as Grand 
Master, (i) A copy of this interesting token is now in the possession 
of Bro. A. E. Lloyd Oswell, P.M. Forty members and visitors 
sat down to dinner on St. John's Day in December, the Secretary's 
only remark on the subject is that " the Evening was spent in 
hai'mony and due decorum." 

The average attendance in the year 1792 was only 12, 

1792. and only 8 Ceremonies were performed. Three of these 
ceremonies were performed in one evening upon Bro. 

Partridge, whose case is deserving of some further notice. He 
was a visitor, without any protest being made, at the February 
lodge, but when his name was mentioned in September as a 
joining brother, it was decided, as he was a member under the 
" Antient Constitution," he could not become a member of a, 
Modern Lodge without undergoing re-initiation. He was 
accordingly balloted for as an ordinary candidate, and being 
accepted, was initiated, passed, and raised the same evening. 
Bro. William Ford who was also a " Member of the Ancient 
Constitution " was rejected when proposed under similar circum- 
stances. Bro. Gould remarks'^' — " Undue stress has been laid 
upon the custom which prevailed under the two Grand Lodges 
of England of requiring brethren who had already graduated 
under one system, to go through the ceremonies a second time 
under the other. The fees for registration may have been at the 
bottom of the whole affair, and in each case, as the admission of 

(1) Hughana Masonic Kegister, p. 30. 

(8) History o£ Freemasonry, vol. ii., p. 461. 



THE PliOVINCE OF SHBOPSHIKE. 125 

brethren from the rival camp in. the capacity of 
visitors — until a comparatively late period— plainly 1792. 
indicates, a remaking was more a protest against the 
regularity than the validity of the degree to which the postulant 
had previously been admitted." A converse re-making may be 
noted in the records of 117, which was, as we know, until the 
Union, an "Ancient" Lodge. Under date Jan. 9th, 1811, we 
read that "Mr. John Beer, Sergt. was proposed to be ancinized" ; 
the Secretary, we may conclude, meant to say " ancientized," if 
such a word may be coined for the occasion. 

The Chair during the entire year was filled by the Senior 
"Warden, Bro. Jones, as Bro. Barkley, who had been elected 
Master, resigned that office on Jan. 3rd. 

The Lodge exercised a great amount of caution in the 
initiation of a Serving Brother. His note of hand for £3 7s. Od. 
was required from him before the Ceremony was performed, in 
case " he quitted Bro. Trehearn's (the Caterer) services before 3 
years." This was evidently to prevent the possibility of a gratu- 
itous initiation, which might have taken place if the Brother in 
question had suddenly ceased to serve the Lodge. 

In the previous year the Lodge appears to have lent a 
Bro. Johnston, who was not a member, the sum of £& 10s. 4d., 
and to have taken from him his notes of hand for that amount. 
Bro. Johnston was evidently in poor circumstances, as in this 
year a Committee appointed to deal with his business, accepted 
from his sureties " half the money due upon the notes in full 
satisfaction to the Lodge." The minute then continues—" but 
the notes should remain in the possession of the Lodge, in order 
to enable the persons to whom the same are made payable, to 
recover the money from Johnston, and reimburse the sureties 
what money they should pay." 

The appointment of a Committee of Charity about this 
period, is worth noticing. Hitherto the W.M. seems to have 
been the principal almoner, except in cases where rehef was voted 
to specific Brethren in open Lodge. 



126 FKEEMASONRY IN 



At this time, too, occurs the first mention of the 

1792. "Cumberland Society for the Support and education of 
Female children, daughters of Masons,'' ealled after- 
wards the " Royal Cumberland Free Masons School," and now 
the well-known Masonic Institution for Girls. The Lodge 
determined to support its funds by collecting 5/- from every 
initiate, but with considerable caution added, "provided the 
Lodge shall have the privilege with other Lodges to recommend 
proper objects for this Charity." The School was founded in 
1788, and took its original name from the Duke of Cumberland, 
the Grand Master of the " Moderns." 

The by-laws were now revised ; a copy is preserved in the 
Minute Book, but only three changes need be mentioned. — 
These are (1) that the choice of a Secretary and of the Wardens 
was now placed in the hands of the W.M., subject, however, to 
the approval of the Lodge — (2) that a single fee of £3 3s. Od. was 
to be paid for initiation, no subsequent charge being made for 
the other ceremonies — and (3) that all polls and ballots were to 
be taken by the Junior Warden. The last mentioned alteration 
was doubtless due to the abolition of the office of Deacon, which 
has been already noticed. 

The next entry that calls for notice relates to one of the 
saddest events that a Mason has ever to deal with. — " Bro. John 

, lately admitted a member of the Lodge, having conducted 

himself improperly, and having defrauded several members, 
of the Lodge of money, and otherwise degraded the character of 
a Mason. — It was therefore unanimously resolved that the sd. 

John be expelled the Lodge, and his name be erased from 

the list of Members." 

The number of the Lodge, owing to a general re-numbering, 
now became 434. 

Some members of the Lodge now appear to have 

1793. become anxious for a more frequent change of officers, 
but a proposal to elect them half-yearly was ultimately 



THE PROVINCE OP SHROPSHIRE. 127 

negatived. Funds were very plentiful, so that it was 
proposed to reduce the yearly subscription of 30/- 1793. 
(2/6 a month, 1/- being for the Lodge funds, and 1/6 
for the expenses of the night) to 20/- The Brethren appear to 
have been delighted with the prospect, as they adopted a resolu- 
tion to that eifect at four successive meetings. Even this 
reduction, when carried out, failed to empty the Treasurer's 
coffers ; at the end of the year we find he had a balance of 
£25 in hand, part of which was employed "in encouraging the 
production of, and becoming subscribers to the Freemasons 
Magazine." 

At a Lodge of Emergency held on Nov. 20th the sum of 
5 guineas was voted to the " relief of the British Troops then in 
Flanders." This was in the time of the younger Pitt, when 
British troops, under the Duke of York, was sent to support the 
coalition of Russia, Austria, Saxony, Sardinia, and Spain, against 
France, then distracted by Civil War, under the Revolutionary 
Government. The whole country seems to have taken part in 
the effort to assist our army. A public meeting in that behalf 
was held in Shrewsbury in November, and from the Chronicle we 
learn that another was held at Bridgnorth, "to supply the 53rd 
or Shropshire Regiment with 500 waiscoats as a tribute to the 
courage and bravery which that regiment had lately shown at 
Nieuport." In the following year, when the situation of the 
Allies was critical, the Earl of Moira was sent out with a 
reinforcement of 10 000 men, and after one of the most brilliant 
and extraordinary marches in history, succeeded in effecting a 
junction with the Duke of York, then nearly surrounded by 
forces much superior in number to those under his command. 
The genius of Napoleon ultimately proved more than a match for 
the Allies, who suffered great privations in their ineffectual 
efforts to oppose him. 

A good part of the Treasurer's Accounts for the year is 
taken up by details in connection with the death and burial of 
Bro. Innys, who, almost since the foundation of the Lodge, had 



128 FREEMASONRY IN 



been in receipt of relief — his rent being paid for him, 

1793. and pecuniary aid constantly given. He was buried at 
the expense of the Lodge, the bills amounting to 

£10 3s. lid.; the Brethren attending the funeral, however, 
provided their own bands and gloves. The Lodge appears to 
have seized all his effects, and sold them by auction amongst the 
members. A total of £19 19s. 6^d. was thus received, the details 
of each Brother's purchase being fully set out. There seems to 
have been some dispute about the rent due by Bro. Innys, as a 
minute of April 15th records that " The Right Worshipful 
Master declared his entire disapprobation of a charge contained 
in Mr. Bickerton's bill against the late Mr. Innys, and also 
declared that Mr. Bickerton never made any such demand in the 
lifetime of Bro. Innys. It was therefore unanimously " Resolved 
that the sd. charge of £1 lis. Od. in the said bill be disallowed." 
The whole history of Bro. Innys supplies an excellent instance of 
the exercise of the brotherly love inculcated by the Craft, and 
also of the close attention then devoted by the Lodge to the 
aifairs of its members. 

In another part of the same Accounts is the item 
£5 6s. 2d. " Cash paid for soldgers clothing," while on the other 
side of the account appears " By cash reed, by Br. Steward of 
Sundry Br. for soldiers cloathing £4 Os. Od." This transaction 
has reference, I suppose, to the relief voted for the troops in 
Flanders. The 5 guineas voted out of the funds of the Lodge, 
seems to have been partly defrayed by private subscription 
amongst the members, and its value in clothes duly forwarded to 
the Seat of War. 

This was a very quiet year in the history of the Lodge ; 

1794. in many instances the minutes of the meetings held 
only record the names of the Brethren present. Bro. 

Shirreff, D.P.G.M., now joined the Lodge as an honorary member. 
We find a trace of his quarrel with the P.G.M. in the fact that 
the Lodge forwarded a subscription of one guinea to the General 
Fund of Charity through the latter, and not through his Deputy, 
as in former years. 



THE PROVINCE OP SHROPSHIRE. 129 

The Treasurer records on June 26th having 
received 5/- for the first seven numbers of the Free- 1794. 
masons' Magazine," but its published price does not 
appear. Bro. Secretary seems to have been in a hurry on Dec. 
29th as his only remark is "The Lodge spent in Harmony, &c." 

The question of arrears was again seriously con- 
sidered in this year, and Grand Lodge was written to 1795. 
for advice upon the subject. An absent P.G.M. and a 
discredited Deputy, left the Lodge no other source of information 
to apply to. A Committee of Charity was again appointed, but 
on this occasion it received very definite instructions as to its 
mode of action — " It is orderecl that when any person shall 
apply in that situation (viz. distressed) one or more of the 
Committee shall examine him, and if he or they discover him to 
be a true brother, they give an order to the treasurer for such 
relief as shall be by them thought necessary, and that no brother 
be relieved out of the Fund of the Lodge by any other means." 

On April 7th a letter was read from Bro. Bourlay charging 
Bro. Trehearn with ill-usage, and a lodge was summoned to 
inquire into the matter, which accordingly met in July. The 
minute runs : — " The Lodge this night assembled having heard 
Bro. Bourlay's charge against Bro. Trehearn, and also Bro. 
Trehearn's defence thereto, and having heard the evidence of 
Bro. Jones who was present at the affray between Bro. Bourlay 
and Bro. Trehearn, do adjudge that Bro. Trehearn did not 
conduct himseK as a Brother Mason towards Brother Bourlay, 
and therefore the Lodge doth order that Bro. Trehearn shall and 
do make a concession to Bro. Bourlay in the Lodge Room for his 
misbehaviour, which was accordingly done." One cannot help 
wondering from whence the Lodge conceived it had received its 
jurisdiction to make such an order, or what would have been the 
consequences of disobedience to it. 

On August 4th a letter was read from Sir Robert Cotton, 
P.G.M. for Cheshire, recommending to the notice of the Lodge 

Q 



130 FREEMASONRY IN 



"A Chronological and Brief History of the French 

1795. Revolution," by Bro. Talma. Bro. Talma was a visitor 
on this occasion, but the Lodge does not appear to have 

bought a copy of the work in question. 

In November the Lodge was invited to the Consecration 
of the Royal Edward Lodge. This was the Leominster Lodge, 
which became extinct sometime before 1832. There is now, 
however, a Lodge of the same name (No. 892) in the same town, 
which was founded in 1861. Bro. Jones, the Treasurer, died 
during his year of office. The Brethren attended the funeral, and 
refreshed themselves very liberally at the expense of the Lodge. 

Bro. Thomas Gray, Junr., applied for relief, but as his 

1796. name had some time before been erased for non-payment 
of his subscription, his application was refused. Bro. 

Carline, W.M., seems to have had a frugal mind, as he 
proposed "that all visitors in future should pay 2/6, and also 
that only the sum of money arising from the subscribing members 
be expended on the lodge night, any extra expense to be paid by 
the members present." These propositions were ultimately 
adopted, and twelve months later we find the second of them 
ordered to be strictly enforced. Some such arrangement was 
evidently necessary, as the Lodge was clearly going down hill, 
and not nearly so prosperous as formerly. The average 
attendance during the year only reached 1 1, and only one 
initiation took place. 

In March we find the Lodge at conflict with its printer. 

1797. " The Lodge unanimously agreed that Mr. Wood be 
paid for advertising the Festival of St. John once only, 

it appearing to the Lodge that Mr. Wood had made a wilful 
mistake in inserting the advertisement before the date — by adver- 
tising the festival on the 18th Dec, and dating the same the 25th." 

The ordering of two columns for the use of the Wardens, 
leaves us in doubt whether or not the Lodge had previously been 
destitute of these articles of furniture. 



THE PROVINCE OF SHROPSHIEE. 131 

Once again, after a long interval, we hear of 
Bro. Johnston's notes of hand. A Committee was now 1797. 
appointed to interview him on the subject. The result 
of this interview is evident from an inspection of the Treasurer's 
Book as we find in it an entry dated August as follows — " Bro. 
Johnston 10/- in the pound on his notes of hand £3 5s. Od." 
This sura was not half of the £8 10s. 4d. previously stated to 
have been lent, but I cannot account for the discrepancy. The 
Lodge apparently never paid over this sum of £3 5s. Od. to Bro. 
Johnston's sureties, which assuredly ought to have been done in 
pursuance of the agreement made with Bro. Johnston in 1792. 
Perhaps we may assume that Bro. Johnston's circumstances had 
now materially improved, and that he himself reimbursed his 
sureties for the payments made by them on his behalf. 

Two Brethren in prison, recommended to the notice of the 
Lodge by the Egerton Lodge, were " found on enquiry not to be 
proper objects " of charity. It is interesting to note that at this 
period prison discipline allowed relief to be administered to the 
prisoners from outside sources. In the Chronicle of Dec. 19th 
the following curious advertisement occurs : — " The prisoners in 
the County Goal return their hearty thanks to a Gentleman 
Farmer for his annual donation to be laid out in beef and plum 
pudding for their dinner on Christmas Day." 

The Festival of St. John was celebrated as usual, but the 
Secretary's only remark thereon is — " The Evening conducted in 
the best manner." 

Henry Bowdler, aged only 17 years, was initiated 
in March, by virtue of a Dispensation from the P.G.M. 1798. 
(Egerton). The petition presented by Bro. Bowdler 
was for some reason put upon the minutes. From the subjoined 
copy it will be seen that it was practically identical with the 
form in use at the present day. " I Henry Bowdler of my own 
free-will, unbiassed by friends or uninfluenced by mercenary 
motives, do freely and voluntary (sic) offer myself a candidate for 



132 



FMEEMASONIIY IN 



ye mistiry of free masonry, it's soly from the favourable 

1798. oppinion I have of the Institution makes me solicit to 

become a Brother, if I should therefore be happy 

enough to be accepted, I am determined to chearfuUy conform to 

all the Rules Customs and Regulations of the Society. Witness 

my Hand this first day of March, 1798. 

HENRY BOWDLER." 

The dispensation was in the form of a letter to Bro. Geo. 
Bowdler, the father of the Candidate — 

" Sir — I have this morning received your letter forwarded 
from Whitchurch ; and by the first, in hopes this may arrive in 
time, I forward my permission as P.G.M. to make your son a 
Mason tho' under age, in case the Lodge chuse to elect him. If 
a regular dispensation should be necessary, I shall order you to 
be acquainted therewith. I beg leave to present my respects to 
the Shrewsbury Lodge, 

Duke of Bridgewater and am Sir 

Cleveland Court, yr. obedt. hble. Servt., 

5 March 1798 FRANCIS H. EGERTON." 

Under the address was written these words — " The Post- 
master at Salop is desired to order this to be delivered on 
Tuesday Evg. 6th March." 

The certificate given to Bro. Bowdler was " signed by the 
Master and Wardens &c.," and is in the form of a letter 
addressed to him ; apparently this was deemed sufficient. 

The minute of July 10th has a curt quaintness about it 
worth noticing, it is : — " Nothing particular occur'd." 

Bro. Gray, whose name had been erased from the roll of 
the Lodge members, applied for a Certificate, which was refused j 
he made several attempts in succeeding years to melt the Lodge 
into acquiesence with his wishes in this respect, but without 
success. 



THE PROVINCE OF SHEOPSHIUE. 133 

The Brethren, appeared to think that they had 
had enough of Sermons in their previous experiences, as 1798. 
they now resolved not to send any answer to " a letter 
from Mr. Perfect of Mailing with proposals for the Sermons by 
the Rev. Jethro Inwood, B.A." 

Up to this date the number of Brethren admitted was 
about 90. Amongst the names of old Salopians we find the 
following — John Beck, Thomas Loxdale, Samuel Meire, William 
Heighway, John Carline, William Clement (the father of 
W. J. Clement, the late well-known Shrewsbury Surgeon), and 
James Sandford. 

From this year until 1813 the downward course 
of the Lodge continued almost without a break. Only 10 1799. 
lodges were held, with an average attendance of 9 
members ; twice, the orthodox number to form a complete lodge 
was only obtained by the presence of visitors. No ceremonies of 
any description were performed ; no lodges were held in January, 
February, or July ; and the minutes contain no records of business 
transacted until December. In that month we find a Committee 
was appointed " to take into consideration the state of our 
finance and other urgent Busines's. Also our continuance of one 
guinea Subn. to the Grand Lodge Fund of Charity.'' Part of this 
business was certainly urgent, as the Treasurer only had 2/7 in 
hand at the end of the year. 

The pecuniary difficulties mentioned in the pre- 
ceding year caused the subscription to be again raised to 1800. 
30/- per annum. Even this measure was ineffectual to" 
prevent the existence of a deficit of £i 8s. 4d. on this year's 
accounts. About this time the 21st Dragoons seems to have 
been quartered in Shrewsbury, having come there from Bridg- 
north. Four members of the Regiment joined the Lodge ; they 
had been made in the Lodge of Industry 578, founded in 
Bridgnorth in the previous year. As a consequence, perhaps, of 
this influx of Bridgnorth Masons, the intercourse between the 



134 PREEMASONEY IN 



Salopian Lodge and the Lodge of Industry was of a 

1800. most friendly character, and mutual invitations passed 
between them. The members of the former Lodge 

attended a procession at Bridgnorth in their private capacity, and 
the Bridgnorth Lodge came to Shrewsbury to celebrate the 
Festival of St. John. The minutes also from time to time contain 
the names of casual visitors from Bridgnorth. 

In February the Secretary notes the levy by Grand 
Lodge of a poll tax of 2/- per member. This tax was established 
in 1799 to pay off the debt on the Freemasons' Hall, which had 
greatly increased. Stringent regulations were made for the 
erasure of lodges not paying it, and in consequence many, 
including two Shropshire Lodges, were struck off the roll ; it was 
exacted every year till 1810. 

An instance occurs in this year of a matter which has not 
been previously noted, but which was then usual and continued 
so for many years. It appears to have been considered that the 
passing or raising of a brother could only take place after a 
proposition to that effect had been duly made and carried. The 
W.M. does not seem to have then had that discretion in such 
matters which he now exercises. 

The minute of Augt. 5th discloses the first sign of the 
dissatisfaction of the Lodge at their accommodation at the Fox. 
" It was ordered that the ill-treatment of the Lodge by Bro. 
Trehearn should be inquired into." Accordingly in October the 
Lodge gave notice of its intention to move to other quarters. 

The new home of the Lodge was in the Trumpet Inn, 

1801. kept by Bro. Cottom, its first Junior Warden. The 
Trumpet was situate in Hill's Lane, Mardol. The 

change does not seem to have been at all successful. 

In March a Bro. who wished to join the Lodge was black 
beaned, but in May another ballot was taken, as some of the 
members thought there was an error in the former one, and upon 
this occasion he was duly elected. 



THE PROVINCE OP SHROPSHIRE. 135 

In June Bro. Clement waselected W.M. Why 
this election took place is not disclosed. Bro. Bassett, 1801. 
who was W.M. in the first half of the year, also presided 
over the majority of Lodges held during the remainder of the 
year, but he is always described thus — " Bro. Bassett as W.M." 
Bro. Clement never took the chair at this, or any other, period. 

In August the Lodge was invited to attend a P.G. Lodge 
at Hereford. A grand procession was in contemplation to go to 
Divine Service. The Ceremony was in honour of the birthday of 
the Royal Grand Master, afterwards George IV. 

A Bro. Finch of Canterbury in this year honoured the 
Lodge with the first of a long series of letters with " proposals 
for publishing by subscription a Masonic Key, price 3/6, 
containing upwards of 500 different allusions and explinations 
(sic) relative to the Masonic Order, which contains full one third 
more than what is practised in either Ancient or Modern Lodges." 
The Lodge declined to subscribe, and it acted wisely in so doing. 
Finch was a Masonic impostor of an unusually brazen and 
pertinacious type. One of his works was the creation in Ireland 
of a fancy degree called the Order of Philippi. 

In December occurs the first mention of the " Masonic 
Society's Fund for the relief of the Sick." This, I imagine, was 
the " Masonic Benefit Society," which was started in 1799 upon 
the same basis as all other Benefit Societies, but probably did 
not survive the Union in 1813. 

The average attendance was again lowered, it now only 
reached 8 ; on three separate occasions only five members were 
present. Bro. Trehearn of the Fox seems to have borne no 
lasting animosity on account of the Lodge having left his house, 
as his name once more appears in the list of Members. 

Ten ceremonies performed in this year recall the 
memories of non-flourishing days gone by, and four 1802. 
raisings in one night must have kept the Lodge fully 



136 FREEMASONRY IN 



employed. It is rather curious that Bro. Hitchcock, 

1802. one of the new initiates, should have been elected 
Secretary in December, his fitness for that post must 

have been to a great extent a matter of faith. 

As an instance of the close attention paid by the Lodge 
to the affairs of its members, the case of Bro. Carswell may be men- 
tioned. For some time the Brethren had been greatly concerned 
about his non-attendance to his Masonic duties. The Secretary 
was ordered to visit him, and when that official reported at the 
next meeting that he had visited Bro. Carswell but could not see 
him, the Tyler was sent to him during lodge hours. The Tyler 
announced that he " found him particularly engaged, but would 
certainly attend next Lodge night." This promise was not kept, 
and the Brethren then appear to have looked upon the matter 
as hopeless, and did not worry Bro. Carswell any further. 

The late Treasurer was requested in December " to pay 
immediately what money was due to the Lodge." He declared it 
not to be in his power to do so, " but would certainly pay it by 
the end of January next." The amount was £8 Is. 2d., and, so 
far as I can ascertain, no repayment was ever made. 

The entries this year are purely formal, and do not 

1803. require any notice. The only business recorded outside 
the ordinary routine, is that the Tyler was admonished 

for neglect of duty. 

The Lodge was invited on August 13th to another 

1804. procession at Hereford, but does not seem to have 
accepted the invitation. The attendance of Brethren 

at lodge was very small, and no business is recorded on several 
dates. A letter from a Bro. Pullen was answered, " inclosing his 
imaginary Notes " (? Notis). Wliat this minute refers to I have 
been unable to discover. 



THE PKOVINCE OF SHEOPSHIRE. ' 137 

In September, the Mercian Lodge, Ludlow, 
founded in this year, invited the Lodge to join in their 1805. 
procession, but an answer was sent " stating the 
impossibility of attending as a Lodge." In return for this 
invitation, the Salopian Lodge wrote a letter to the Mercian 
Lodge " stating the necessity of well considering the custom of 
relieving Brethren in distress, and that caution is necessary to 
prevent being the dupes of impostors." The former Lodge had 
twice in the previous year refused assistance to applicants, as 
they were not ht objects of Charity, so that this letter of advice 
to the younger Lodge was by no means superfluous or 
unnecessary. 

The lodges in these years were regularly held, 
but little interest seems to have been taken in Masonic 1806-7-8 
work by the great majority of members. The average 
attendance was very small, and only two ceremonies were 
performed in the whole period. A rather quaint minute on 
Nov. 2nd, 1807, records that a proposition to erase the names of 
members in arrear with their subscriptions, " was generally 
seconded but particularly by Bro. Bassett." In July ' 1808 
another invitation from Ludlow was received, another procession 
having been arranged for in that town. 

Once more the Secretary records the expulsion 
of a member "in consequence of his irregular 1809. 
behaviour." The brother in question was Junior 
Warden, and was actually present in the lodge at the time the 
resolution expelling him was carried. The Brethren appear to 
have been desirous of acting very strictly in the matter, as the 
Secretary was ordered to report it to Grand Lodge, and the 
minute was signed by the W.M. The practice of confirming the 
minutes had not then been invented, or at all events had not yet 
been introduced into the Salopian Lodge, and this is only an 
isolated instance of such a custom, not the beginning of a regular 
habit of so doing. 



138 



PREEMASONUT IN 



The small attendance of members, which had now 
1810-11 continued for some years, induced the Lodge to hold its 

meetings quarterly instead of monthly. The day of 
meeting was also changed from Tuesday to Monday, although no 
alteration was made in the by-laws. To get a larger number of 
Brethren together, a circular letter of invitation was sent to all 
Masons resident near Shrewsbury, but no effect was produced. 
Only three visitors appeared during the entire year 1810, and 
none in 1811. In the former year the total amount received by 
the Treasurer, including Subscriptions to the banquets, only 
reached the sum of £6 l-Ss. 6d. This may account for the 
" inability of the Lodge to subscribe anything towards the relief of 
the British prisoners in France.'' 

In December, 1811 the celebration of the Festival of 
St. John was postponed to Jan. 1st, 1812, owing to the election 
of a Member of Parliament for the Borough of Shrewsbury. The 
member then elected was The Hon. H. G. Bennet, afterwards 
Provincial Grand Master. 

On Jan. 1st is the first recorded instance of the 
1812. Lodge holding its banquet in the evening. The 
hour was 7 o'clock, and the price of the tickets 
2/6 each. 

In December Grand Lodge requested a subscription 
towards a Masonic jewel to be presented to the Right Honble. 
the Earl of Moira. The answer of the Lodge weis a refusal, 
couched in the following terms : — " As we are not subscribers to 
the Charity Fund, it would npt be proper to subscribe, our Lodge 
being small." The Earl of Moira, afterwards the Marquis of 
Hastings, was then the Acting Grand Master, and was about to 
proceed to India as Governor General of that Colony. The 
jewel was duly presented to him, no less a sum than £1000 being 
spent in purchasing it. I cannot attempt to give any account of 
his life, interesting though it be ; both as a soldier and a Mason 
it was full of work well done. I may, however, state that to his 



THE PUOVINCE OF SHKOPSHIKE. 139 

influence is commonly ascribed the exemption of the 
Society from the provisions of 39 Geo. III. c. 99, 1812. 
which was intended to suppress all Secret Societies. 
Had his efforts been unsuccessful in this respect, the Craft 
could not have continued to exist as a legal institution. 

Another instance occurs this year of the custom of 
attending the funeral of a deceased brother. The expenses for 
refreshments were, however, on this occasion only 6/- 

Owing to Bro. Cottom leaving the Trumpet, the 
Lodge had to seek a new home, and removed to the 1813. 
Britannia Inn. There it remained but one year, and held 
only four meetings. No record of any change of officers exists, and I 
believe that frpm 1812 to 1814 inclusive, the brethren appointed 
in the former year remained unaltered in their respective posts. 

This year was a most eventful one in the history of the 
Craft in England, as in it the Union between the rival Grand 
Lodges was effected. The great impetus given to the prosperity 
of the Masonic Order by this happy event cannot be over- 
estimated. Immediately it was consummated, the Craft, 
formerly divided and distracted by internal dissensions, acquired 
a greatly extended influence and reputation. New Lodges 
sprang up in every direction, and the old Lodges found the 
number of their members increasing rapidly. An increased 
public knowledge of and sympathy with Masonic work, produced 
renewed efforts to spread the "Light," on the part of its 
guardians. That success crowned those efi'orts is a matter of 
notoriety. The story of the Union is so well-known, that any 
attempt to relate it here may seem superfluous, but as it forms a 
most important page in the history of any last century Lodge, a 
short account is appended. 

The Grand Lodge of England, established at the 
memorable meeting of the members of the Four Old Lodges, 
held in. London in 1717, held, until the year 1739, undisputed 



140 



FKEEMASONRY IN 



sway over all the Lodges in England, with the single 
1813. exception of that belonging to the York Masons. This 

Body had been established in the City of York for a 
very long period of time and was in 1725 acknowledged by the 
Grand Lodge of England to be independent of its jurisdiction. 
Thereupon it assumed the title of the Grand Lodge of All 
England, which it retained until its collapse in 1792. Its efforts 
were always practically confined to Yorkshire and Lancashire. 
In the year 1739 the Grand Lodge of England proceeded to 
" consider a complaint against certain brethren suspected of being 
concerned in an irregular making of Masons," and ultimately 
ordered that " the laws be strictly put in execution against all 
brethren who should, for the future, countenance, connive, or 
assist at any irregular makings." The supposed consequences of 
this order are very forcibly put in a note by Bro. Horthouck, the 
Editor of the Book of Constitutions, 1784, appended to the 
report of the proceedings of Grand Lodge above quoted. He 
says : — " The Grand Lodge justly considered such proceedings as 
an infringement on the original laws, an encroachment on the 
privileges, and an imposition on the Charitable fund of the 
Society. It was therefore resolved to discountenance those 
assemblies, and to enforce the laws against all brethren who were 
aiding or assisting in the clandestine reception of any person into 
Masonry at any of these illegal conventions. This irritated the 
brethren who had incurred the censure of the Grand Lodge, who, 
instead of returning to their duty, and renouncing their error, 
persisted in their contumacy, and openly refused to pay allegiance 
to the Grand Master, or obedience to the mandates of the Grand 
Lodge. In contempt of the Ancient and established laws of the 
Order, they set up a power independent ; and, taking advantage 
of the inexperience of their associates, insisted that they had an 
equal authority with the Grand Lodge to make, pass, and raise 
Masons. At this time no private Lodge had the power of passing 
or raising Masons, nor could any brother be advanced to either 
of these degrees but in the Grand Lodge, with the unanimous 
consent and approbation of all the brethren in communication 



THE PKOVINCE OF SIIKOPSHIRE. 141 

assembled. Under a fictitious sanction of the Ancient 

York Constitution they presumed to claim the right of 1813. 

Constituting Lodges. Some brethren at York continued 

indeed to act under their original constitution, notwithstanding 

the revival of the Grand Lodge of England in 1717 ; but the 

irregular Masons in London never received any patronage from 

them. The Ancient York Masons were confined to one Lodge, 

which is still extant, but consists of very few members, and will 

probably soon be altogether annihilated. This illegal and 

unconstitutional claim obliged the regular Masons to adopt new 

measures to detect these impostors, and debar them and their 

abettors from the countenance and protection of Regular Lodges. 

To accomplish this purpose more effectually, some variations were 

made in the established forms, which afforded a subterfuge, at 

which the refractory brethren readily grasped. They now 

assumed the appellation of "Ancient Masons," proclaimed 

themselves enemies to all innovations, insisted that they preserved 

the ancient usages of the Order, and that the regular Masons, on 

whom they conferred the title of " Modern Masons," had adopted 

new measures illegal and unconstitutional ; thus by a new species 

of deceit and imposition, they endeavoured to support an 

existence, using the necessary precautions taken by Grand Lodge 

to detect them, as a ground for a novel and ridiculous distinction 

of Ancient and Modern Masons. This artifice strengthened 

their party to some degree ; the uninformed were caught by the 

deception, and in order to procure further support to their 

assumed authority, they also determined to interrupt the regular 

mode of succession of Grand Master by electing a chief ruler 

under that designation, and other officers under the title of 

Grand Officers, appointed from their own lodge ; convinced that 

the most probable means for establishing their opposition, would 

be by liberally conferring honours on their votaries to secure 

their allegiance, and induce others to join them. They framed a 

Code of Laws for their government, issued patents for new 

Lodges, and exacted certain fees of constitution, from which they 

hoped to raise a fund sufficient to support their power. They so 



142 FKEEMASONEY IX 



far succeeded in their new plan as to be acknowledged 
1813. by many; some gentlemen of family and fortune 

entered among them, and even many regular Masons 
were so unacquainted with their origin, or the laws of the Society 
as to attend their Lodges, and give a tacit sanction to their 
proceedings — of late years, however, they hav.e not been so 
successful." Such is the account of the origin of the Great 
Schism which has been, until comparatively recent times, received 
as Gospel. It is, however, important to note that it is derived 
from "Modern" sources, and like all other productions of party 
writers, was written rather to run down the opposite faction, than 
to present a true view of the real facts of the case. Bro. Gould, 
whose opinion is worthy of all respect, considers that in the 
period of neglect and misrule which the Craft suffered from 
during the time Lord Byron was Grand Master (1747-1752), and 
in the summary erasures of numerous Lodges for non-attendance 
at the Quarterly Communications and non-payment to the Fund 
of Charity, we find the true causes of the Schism. Another 
recent writer (Bro. Sadler) considers that there is no evidence 
yet brought to Hght, which would justify him in believing that 
any considerable number of the so called Ancients, ever owed 
allegiance to the Grand Lodge of England. His "Masonic Facts 
and Fictions " is an elaborate and able attempt to prove that the 
generally received account of the origin of the Schism, is the 
greatest of all Masonic fictions. His theory, so far as it can be 
presented in a few words, is this : — that there were always in 
existence, from 1717, certain Lodges which never owned allegi- 
ance to the Grand Lodge founded in that year ; that chiefly 
through Irish influences these Lodges maintained the old land- 
marks intact in their struggles with the Society element 
introduced into the Craft at the beginning of the last century — • 
and that from them ultimately developed the Grand Lodge of 
England according to Old Institutions, viz. the " Ancient " Grand 
Lodge. Whatever may have been its true origin, this Grand 
Lodge undoubtedly continued to grow in strength. In 1813 it 
counted 260 Lodges under its banner, at which date its older 



THE PROVINCE OE SHUOPSHIEE. 143 

rival held sway over 386. In the early years of the 
present century efforts were made to put an end to the 1813. 
existing conflict between the two bodies; and, in 1813, 
when the Prince of Wales, afterwards George IV., was Grand 
Master, and his brother, the Duke of Sussex, was Deputy Grand 
Master of the- "Moderns," and another brother, the Duke of 
Kent, was Grand Master of the " Ancients," these efforts were 
at length crowned with complete success. Chiefly by a judicious 
exercise of their undoubted influence, the Royal brothers caused 
to be drawn up Articles of Union, which were ratified on 
Dec. 8th. A Lodge of Reconciliation, consisting of members of 
both Grand Lodges, met to settle uniformity of ritual and 
practice, and, on the Festival of St. John the Evangelist, 
the Articles were duly signed and sealed. An absolute 
equality between the former enemies was agreed upon, 
and all unhappy disputes were forgotten, and their annoyance 
forgiven. The precedence of the Lodges was settled by lot, in 
which the first advantage fell to the Ancients, and their Grand 
Masters Lodge No. 1 Ancients became No. 1 on the roll of the 
United Grand Lodge. No. 1 " Moderns," the Lodge of Antiquity 
was placed No. 2 on the same roll ; No. 2 " Ancients '' and No. 2 
" Moderns " were placed No. 3 and 4 respectively, and this process 
was continued, the " Ancients " and " Moderns " taking 
alternate places, until the rolls of both were exhausted. Hence 
it was that the Salopian Lodge which was No. 434 in 1792 
became No. 498 in 1814. 




144 FREEMASONRY IN 



Section II. (1814-1832). 



The Salopian Lodge certainly shared in a full 
1814. measure in the growing prosperity of the Craft. No 

less than 18 initiations took place in this year. Bro. 
Richard Phillips, the W.M. elected at the close of the year, was 
also Mayor of Shrewsbury, and it seems probable that his position 
in the town was partly responsible for this sudden influx of 
candidates. In June the Lodge removed to the Unicorn 
Inn, at the bottom of the Wyle Cop, but remained 
there only a few nights and then again changed its home 
to the Raven and Bell Yard Inn, situate at the top of the 
same street. The Unicorn has during the year 1891 been well 
restored, and is now a good example of the old "Black & White," 
style so common in this County. 

Early in the year the Lodge relieved a " Bro. Mons De 
Largen," a French Officer prisoner of war in great distress ; a 
strange contrast this to the refusal in 1811 to assist our own 
countrymen, prisoners of war in France. The contrast is doubt- 
less explained by the altered state of the Lodge Finances. 

I have now to record the most important public event in 
which the Lodge ever took any prominent part. On Dec. 27th a 
Lodge was held at the Town Hall, Shrewsbury, " for the purpose 
of forming a procession, under a dispensation from H.R.H. The 
Duke of Sussex, G.M., to go and lay the first stone of the 
Column intended to be erected in honour of the Right Honble. 
Rowland Lord Hill, K.C.B." The Bridgnorth Lodge attended 
as a Lodge, and including Visitors, more than 50 Masons were 
present at this ceremony. The following account of it is taken 
from the Shrewsbury Chronicle. 



THE PROVINCE OP SHEOPSHIRE. 145 

" On Tuesday the ceremony of laying tho first stone of the 
Column, to be erected in honour of Lord Hill, was performed 1814. 
according to Masonic rule, by the Salopian Lodge of Free and 
Accepted Masons, under the auspices of their R.W. Master, our respected 
Chief Magistrate, Richard Phillips, Esqre., assisted by the brethren from 
other Lodges. The Salopian Lodge and the Deputies from other Lodges, 
assembled at the Town Hall at 11 o'clock, whence thoy proceeded decorated 
with the various insignia of their diffeient Orders, and accompanied by a 
band of Music to the place of the intended Memorial ; where having arrived, 
they thrice marched round in solemn procession, and on the Master of the 
Salopian Lodge coming the third time opposite to the stone appropriated 
for the formal operation, they halted." 

The Rev. Bro. James Matthews, Chaplain to the Lodge, 
then advanced to the platform, and delivered himself of a lengthy 
prayer. This prayer is too long to be quoted here, but it seems 
to have been a remarkable one to have been used on any Masonic 
occasion, as it contained frequent references to the Second Person 
of the Holy Trinity — and concluded with the Lord's Prayer. 
After the Prayer was finished, the W.M. laid the stone, and then 
coming forward he addressed the Architect thus ; — • 

"Sir, As Master of the Work, I salute 3-ou, but as a Mason I greet 
you most heartily ! May God the Divine Architect of the Universe bless your 
Work ! May he endue you with those great blessings he was pleased to 
bestow on our three original Grand Masters ! May he give you wisdom to 
continue, strength to support, and beauty to adorn this our intended work ! 
May he grant you health, wealth, and prosperity during its whole progress, 
and permit you to see a complete finish, or what we Masonically term it — the 
net completely thrown over it." 

To this complimentary eifusion Bro. Straphen (a member 
of the Salopian Lodge), the Master of the Work, replied as 
follows : — 

" Right Worshipful Master, Senior, and Junior Wardens, Brethren All 
—I have to return you my most sincere and hearty thanks for the honour you 
have done me this day ; for the confidence you repose in me on this occasion ; 
for presenting me with this scroll, the jewels, the tools of an operative Master ; 
hoping by conforming to these, and a strict observance of tlic rules of 
Masonry, I shall acquit myself in that department, and with the Divine Aid 
of the Great Architect of the Universe and the assistance of the Brethren, I 
shall be enabled to complete this intended structure, so as to prove an honour 
to the Craft, as well as a lasting Memorial in honour of our Shropshire Hero, 
Lord Hill." 

After the inscription had been read by Bro. Bassett, the 
W.M. then addressed the Lodges again : — 



146 FREEMASONRY IN 



" Brethren, This is the only honour that we as Masons can 
1814. publicly confer upon our Noble Warrior. We have other honours 

to bestow, but, owing to the strictness of our Order, these honours 
must be given within the walls of our Lodge. With your permission we will 
return thither, and with your kind assistance perform the honours which his 
Lordship so richly merits from the heart and hand of every true Mason." 
" The band then played God Save the King ; the first verse of the National 
Air was sung in full chorus ; after which three times three cheer.s to the honour 
of the Shropshire Hero concluded the ceremony. The Brethren then returned 
in procession to the Town Hall. In the evening the festival of St. John was 
celebrated in their new Lodge Boom at the Raven and Bell with that spirit 
of harmony so peculiar to Masonic Institutions." 

The inscription placed upon the Column was as follows — 

"The first stone was laid by Richard Phillips, Esqre. , Mayor of 
Shrewsbury, and Master of the Salopian Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons, 
assisted by the Chaplain, Wardens, the Brethren of this, and Deputies from 
other Lodges upon the 27th day of December in the year of our Lord 1814, 
and in the year of Masonry 6814, being the Festival of St. John. The funds 
for this beautiful memorial, in honour of splendid talent and private woith 
were furnished by a public subscription raised chiefly by the inhabitants of 
this town and County of Salop." 

Amongst minor details in connection with this event I 
may mention that the stone, thus laid by Bro. Phillips, weighed 
4| tons, and measured lift. Sin. long, by 3ft. broad, and 2ft. high. 
Bro. John Carline, a very well-known member of the Lodge, 
obtained third prize for his design in the competition arranged 
for securing suitable plans for the erection of the Memorial. 
The Lodges paid £i 10s. Od. for the band which headed the 
procession, and also paid for having the bells of the Abbey Church 
and St. Chad's rung, besides giving a liberal fee to the 
" "Workmen at the Collumn." Fifty-one sat down to dinner 
in the evening, and the bill for refreshments was sufficiently 
large to show us that the Lodgfe dealt out hospitality with no 
niggardly hand. Lord Hill was not, so far as I can ascertain, a 
member of any Shropshire Lodge, but the allusion in one speech 
of Bro. Phillips to those honours which could only be conferred 
upon him within the walls of the Lodge, seems to indicate that 
he was a member of the Craft. 

In February Lord Hill called on Bro. Phillips, and 

1815. asked him to thank the members of the Lodge for the 

honour they had done him in attending in Masonic 



THE PROVINCE OP SIIROPSHIEE. 147 

form to lay the first stone of the Column. Bro. Phillips 

must have died shortly afterwards, as in August the 1815. 

Lodge appeared in mourning for him. He was the 

only Master of the Lodge who died during his year of office. 

Commenting on his death, the Chronicle of July 21st remarked 

that — " He died whilst Mayor, an office in which he exerted 

himself with unwearied diligence, and for the public benefit." 

An attempt was made in this year to obtain the services 
of Bro. Sir John Hill, Bart., who had lately joined the Lodge, to 
act as Master. His reply is, perhaps, worth recording — 

Hawkstone, 

15tli December, 1815. 

" Mr. Bowley, I am much obliged to you and other good friends and 
Brother Masons, for the hint given, that 1 might probably be honour'd with 
a high situation in your most respectable Lodge at Shrewsbury, but as I now 
lind that at my time of life (tho' blessed with better health than most are 
when in the 7(ith year), it will not be probable that I shall be able to attend 
to the duties as I ought to do. Indeed was it not for this impedieut I should 
think myself very improper to undertake anything of the sort, for altho' 
having regularly attended for abont three years, to our late R.W. Master at 
AVhitchurch, Major Shirreff, and having been admitted a Master, want of 
practice would make me a very unfit person to undertake any office in a. 
Society to which I ever shall retain a most sincere Brotherlike regard." 

I presume the words " having been admitted a Master," 
refer to the time when the writer filled the chair of the Egerton 
(Whitchurch No. 2) Lodge. The title " Right " prefixed to the 
words "Worshipful Master" was discontinued at the Union, 
but from this letter, as well as from the Lodge minutes, we see 
that it was, as might reasonably be expected, still used for several 
years in the Country. 

A fit of economy led the Lodge to discontinue suppers 
during the summer months, and also to arrange " that no spirits 
should be allowed at the expense of the Lodge " during the same 
period. 

This was a very busy year; 20 Lodges were 
held, and 28 Ceremonies performed. Four raisings I8I61 
were carried out on two separate occasions; 



148 FHEEMASONEY IN 



On May 9th it was proposed " that a procession should 
1816. be made on the 21:th of June to lay the last stone 

of the Column," and the Secretary was instructed 
to write to Grand Lodge for a dispensation, and also to 
the Chester, Bridgnorth, and Ludlow Lodges, inviting them 
to attend. The dispensation was duly obtained, but the 
minute book does not record whether or not this procession 
took place. Its silence upon the point leads me to believe 
that the Ceremony was abandoned, and this belief is 
confirmed by the only account of the matter contained in the 
Chronicle, which records that "The last stone of Lord Hill's 
Column, erected near this town, was laid on Tuesday 18th, 
being the anniversaiy of the battle of Waterloo." A public 
ceremony would probably have received more notice from a local 
paper than is contained in the passage quoted. The top stone of 
the Column could, I imagine, be laid with greater ease and 
safety by Operative than by Speculative Masons, and considera- 
tions of personal risk may have conduced to the absence of 
Members of the Lodge. The Salopian Lodge does not seem at 
this period to have realized that the Salopian Lodge of Charity 
had settled down in Shrewsbury in the previous year, or the 
invitation above referred to would have been extended to its 
members The first mention of the latter Lodge in the minute 
books of the former occurs in 1819. 

Suppers were again discontinued during the Summer 
months, but in this year this abstinence on the part of the 
brethren was partially compensated for by the unanimous vote 
that " A proper quantity of spirits be allowed." 

The Lodge now again moved ; this time it found a home 
at the Crown, which was then kept by Edward Jones, who was 
at once initiated, and made a member of the Lodge. It is worth 
noting that this removal was voted for in a lodge summoned 
especially to consider the subject, and that none but Master 
Masons were allowed to attend. In later years the practice of 
sxcluding E.A's and F.C.'s from a participation in Lodge 



THE PROVINCE OP SHEOPSHIEE. 14:9 

proceedings was referred to as " an old established 
custom." This is the first occasion upon which I can find 1816. 
this custom was adopted, and there is no evidence to be 
found in the minute books, that either previously or subsequently 
to this date such a custom passed into a common practice. 

New by-laws were passed, and an inventory of the Lodge 
furniture was made in this year, but no copy of either has been 
preserved. One new by-law, which was enacted at this time, 
provided that fines should be paid by every brother absent from 
the Lodge of Instruction, or on a regular Lodge night, or from a 
Lodge of Emergency, but it was, I think, speedily allowed to be 
forgotten. 

A letter -was received in September from Grand 
Lodge (? Grand Chapter) proposing to the members 1817. 
of the Lodge to have a Chapter of the Royal Arch. 
A very short time before this letter was written, the two 
Grand Chapters, which had formerly existed under the 
patronage of the rival Grand Lodges, had effected a Union, 
and the United Grand Chapter of England was evidently 
endeavouring to secure as many dependent Chapters as 
possible. No chapter was formed in Shrewsbury at this time, 
though, as will be seen hereafter, (i) the Brethren of 262 were 
undoubtedly surreptitiously yet innocently working the Eoyal 
Arch at this very period, without any proper charter or authority 
for that purpose. Such working was, however, not carried out 
in the Craft Lodge, as was frequently the case in " Ancient " 
Lodges before the Union. 

The office of Deacon was now quietly re-established, 
without any resolution upon the subject. This was only natural, 
as the office was at the Union recognized by the United Grand 
Lodge to be a useful and necessary one. 

In this year the name of Bro. Thomas Slater is recorded 
as a visitor from the "Opperative Lodge of St. John 184." 



(1) See History of Salopian Chapter. 



150 



FREEMASONRY IN 



In Bro. Hughan's Masonic Register I find that No. 184 

1817. was at this date the Lodge of St. Albans, Birmingham, 
but I cannot ascertain if this was the Lodge of which 

Bro. Slater was a member. The existence of a truly operative 
Lodge so late as 1817 must, I think, be doubtful. 

Bro. Horsman, formerly a member of the Lodge, now 
rejoined it, and was accepted as a member without a ballot — a 
strange piece of irregularity. 

About this time the Lodge began to feel indignant at 

1818. the long continued absence of the Rev. F. H. Egerton, 
P.G.M., from the Province, and wrote to Grand Lodge 

upon the subject, requesting that a new appointment should be 
made. 

In response to a circular from Grand Lodge asking if any 
alterations were thought desirable in the Laws and Regulations 
of the Craft, a reply was sent that in the opinion of the Lodge 
the Registering (10/6) and Certificate (6/6) fees, were too high. 
This question of the amount of the Registering fees had been for 
some time a sore point with the Lodge, and the Grand Secretary 
had to write many times upon the subject, as the Brethren 
practically refused to pay them to the Lodge, which was, 
nevertheless, held liable for them hj Grand Lodge. In June 
three members, and in July one resigned sooner than pay them, 
though it may be said to their credit that two years later they 
rejoined the Lodge, and then paid what was required without a 
murmur. One of the letters from Grand Lodge was pasted into 
a blank page of the Book of Constitutions (1815), and so has 
been preserved. An extract from it will show that relations 
were getting rather strained. 

London, 

Freemasons' Hall, 
"Sir and Bro., August, 1818. 

After the numerous letters which have been written in respect of the 
Salopian Lodge I did not expect to be under the necessity of addressing you 
again on the same subject. The language contained in your letter is such as 



THE PROVINCE OP SHROPSHIRE. 151 

I would not chuse for your sakes to lay before the Board of 
Finance. It begins by slating 'The demand made by the G.L. 1818. 
against the Salopian Lodge &o." and which according to your 
own showing is only the just dues and contributions payable by the Lodge 
and which has been too long withheld * * * In referring you 
to Bro. Gilkcs I mentioned he would instruct you in the correct method 
adopted since the Union, it is quite useless to enquire of me 'which is 
correct,' more I cannot say by this mode of Communication." 

I am. Sir and Bro., 

very faithfully yours, 

ED. HARPEE, G.S. 



The last sentence of this letter, though not referring to 
the subject for which the letter is primarily quoted, is most 
interesting. It evidently refers to some change in ritual, or 
those other matters which cannot be written of, which were 
settled by the Lodge of Reconciliation after the Union, but 
which had not yet in the Country Lodges been stereotyped in 
practice. In September the Secretary shortly records — '' Received 
two letters from Grand Lodge respecting fees, which business is 
now finally settled." The settlement was of course made by the 
Lodge paying in full what was due. The actual transfer of a 
great part of the money due was however avoided, as the 
Treasurer stopped out of it the sum of £5 granted to Bro. Quick 
out of the General Fund of Benevolence. The passing of a 
Bro. Sinclair, who never was a member of the Lodge, is rather 
curious and irregular, especially as it seems to have been done 
without any communication with his Mother Lodge (No. 28). 
In May the following minute was written — " The W.M. having 
stated to the Lodge that some brother had informed Mr. P — — 
that he was black beaned ; and also that information had been 
o-iven to the wife of a brother respecting business that had been 
transacted in the Lodge, the S.W. proposed that the W.M. be 
requested to inquire into it." This proposition was agreed to, 
but the result of the inquiry is not recorded. Let us hope it will 
prove a warning to the married members of the Lodge, and teach 
them discretion. The initiation fee was twice raised in this year, 
first to 3| guineas, and afterwards to £L 



152 



FREEMASONRY IN 



In February the Secretary was ordered to write to 
1819. Grand Lodge "to know whether the Lodge No. 186 of 

the Shropshire MiHtia had a right to initiate persons 

who were not military men, and also if they had a right to admit 

persons who had been rejected by another Lodge." This is the 

first mention of 186, now 117, contained in the minutes. Grand 

Lodge investigated the subject thoroughly, and a report on the 

matter was made to it by the Board of General Purposes. A 

portion of this report is contained in the Quarterly Communication 

for June, and is as follows : — 

"That a complaint had been preferred against a Military Lodge for 
initiating individuals wlio were not of the Military profession ; that, upon 
inquiry into the ease, it appeared that the Lods;e had acted under the 
mistaken notion, that as the Coips to which their Lodge was attached was 
stationary, the Laws relative to Military Lodges were not applicable to them. 
The Laws of the Grand Lodge relative to Military Lodges being general, aiid 
prohibiting them from initiating any person who does not belong to the 
Military profession, the Lodge was informed that though it was stationary, it 
could not initiate a civilian ; but inasmuch as the Lodge had acted under a 
mistaken notion, and not with any intention to disregard the laws, the Board 
recommended that no further proceeding should be taken against the Lodge 
on this occasion." 

In the following year 117 changed its Warrant for a 

Civil one. 

In May one brother complained that another had traduced 
his character, and the Lodge decided to inquire into the matter. 
It was found, however, that the evidence of non-Masons, who 
could not attend in open Lodge, would be required, and so the 
matter was allowed to drop. 

A journey to London was evidently considered a serious 
matter in the early days of which I am writing — so much so, 
that a Lodge of Emergency was held to initiate a person about to 
proceed there on urgent business. From Owen and Blakeway's 
History of Shrewsbury we learn that in 1822 the journey by 
Coach which had formerly taken 22 hours, was then reduced to 
18, and that 7 coaches ran every day. Incidentally it may be 
mentioned that coaches then ran daily from Shrewsbury to 
Chester, Hereford, Welshpool, and Newtown ; and others, 13 in 
number, to Manchester, Worcester, Aberystwith, Holyhead, and 
Birmingham. 



THE PROVINCE OF SHROPSIIIEE. 153 

On Feb. 7th the Lodge drew up an address of 
condolence to King George IV. upon the death of his 1820. 
father and of congratulation to him upon his own 
accession to the Throne. It is of considerable length, and 
couched in language of extreme loyalty and affection. It is, 
however, chiefly interesting from the fact that it was presented 
to His Majesty by the new Provincial Grand Master, The Honble. 
Henry Grey Bennett, whose name for the first time appears on 
the books of the Salopian Lodge. George IV. had been Grand 
Master, while Prince of Wales, from 1787 to 1813, and, when he 
resigned that office in the latter year, took the title of Grand 
Patron, which he retained after his accession to the Throne. In 
due course an answer to the address, signed " Sidmouth," was 
received by the Lodge, and informed them that " His Majesty had 
been pleased to receive the same in the most gracious manner." 

In March a resolution was passed "that in future no 
brother shall be allowed to vote in any ballot in this Lodge, who 
is not a master mason and a subscriber thereto." This resolution 
was an attempt to establish some legal foundation for the 
exercise of the " old established custom," said, at a subsequent 
date, to have force in the Lodge. It shows that the previous 
.instance already noticed was an irregular proceeding on the part 
of the Master Masons, as there was then no by-law or resolution 
authorising the exclusion of brethren in the lower degrees from a 
participation in Lodge business. 

In July the Lodge sent a subscription to the Royal Kent 
Lod^e of Antiquity, ISTo. 20, held at Chatham, to assist in 
replacing the regalia of that Lodge which had been burnt. This 
Lodge was founded in 1723; its original number on the 
" Modern" roll was 10, but at the Union it became 20, and still 
retains that number. 

Under dispensation from the P.G.M., dated Dec. 27th, 
Andrew Vincent Corbet, of Acton Reynald, though under age, 
was initiated on the following day. He was the father of the 

T 



154 FREEMASONRY IN 



late Baronet of the same name, and was apparently, 

1820. sometime before 1826, appointed D.P.G.M. by the 
Honble. H. G. Bennett, P.G.M. He was a most 

enthusiastic mason, and, even in his old age, constantly attended 
the Installation Ceremony in December. 

In this year the Lodge invested in a painted cloth 
representing the Seven Liberal Arts, and ordered the Trans- 
parency to be completed. This was the beginning of an attempt 
to make the furniture of the Lodge more complete. In the 
following year we find that new pillars were ordered for the 
Wardens, "a Mosaic pavement, Tesselated border and Blazing 
Star" were supplied, and, in 1822, "a Statuary Marble Pedestal" 
was added at a cost of six guineas. This last article might have 
been expected to have resisted the ravages of time, especially as 
an oak case to store it in was provided, bnt it is not now in the 
possession of the Lodge. 

In March the brethren agreed "that in future no 

1821. candidate should be initiated on the night he is 
balloted for except in case of emergency " ; a departure 

from what is found in modern times to be a most convenient 
practice. 

The Lodge about this time began to worry Grand Lodge 
on the subject of the first part of the Book of Constitutions, 
" which has been paid for several years." It appears that shortly 
after the Union in 1813 Grand Lodge obtained subscriptions 
from all the Lodges for the production of this work, which was 
originally designed to be issued in two parts. The first part was 
to contain the history of the Craft in general, and the second 
part the rules and regulations appointed by Grand Lodge for its 
good government. The second part was delivered in due course, but 
various causes delayed the production of the historical volume, 
which was in fact never published. The proof sheets show that 
it would have been only a servile imitation of the history contained 
in the Book of Coiastitutions for 1784 edited by Northoouck, and 
so no great loss was sustained by its non-appearance. 



'Sun PROVIltCE 01* SlillOPSHlftE. 155 

A gentleman who had been proposed as a can- 
didate for initiation in 1816, and then duly accepted, 1821. 
now applied for the return of his deposit money, or in 
the alternative to be admitted. The Lodge, with considerable 
dignity, informed him that " either proposition was contrary to the 
spirit of the by-laws, and could not be entertained." 

The Committee of Management for the celebration in 
Shrewsbury of the Coronation of His Majesty King George IV., 
invited the Lodge to attend the Mayor to Church on that day. 
The Mayor on that occasion was Mr. "VVingfield, uncle to our late 
Bro. Colonel Wingfield, of Onslow, P.M. 262, P.P.G.W., who 
died in May, 1891. The brethren very properly declined this 
invitation, on the ground " that it is contrary to the principles 
of the Craft for a Lodge of Freemasons to join in any other than 
a Masonic Procession.'' 

The Festival of St. John was celebrated as usual in 
December, but on this occasion the enjoyment of the banquet 
must have been considerably damped by the knowledge that it 
had been previously arranged that " No Wine should be on the 
table at the expense of the Lodge after 12 o'clock at night." The 
early closing movement indicated in the first set of by-laws, seems 
by this time to have collapsed. On referring to the Treasurer's 
accounts I find that the banquet alluded to cost nearly £1 a 
head, so that the brethren must have made good use of their 
opportunities before the fatal hour had struck. 

Bro. Hill, passed on Nov. 5th, was raised on Dec. 3rd, an 
irregularity which seems to have escaped the notice of Grand 
Lodge. 

Early in this year it was proposed that " the old 
established custom of excluding Entered Apprentices 1822. 
and Fellow Crafts from participating in the trans- 
actions of the Lodge, be enforced." As has been already 
noticed the only recorded instance of this exclusion was in 1816, 



156 FEEEMASONRY IN 



and even after the resolution passed in 1820, and 

1822. already referred to as making such exclusion from 
thenceforth legal, it was not insisted on. The point 

does not appear to have been again raised, and we subsequently 
find that many propositions were both proposed and seconded by 
members of the classes thus sought to be excluded. A more 
proper proposal, and one more in accordance with the true 
Masonig spirit of equality, was carried shortly afterwards. It 
provided that "no brother should be raised until he had shown 
some proficiency in the Lectures." 

In July the sum of 2 guineas was voted to the "distressed 
Irish." 

From a correspondence with Grand Lodge about this 
period we learn the curious fact that in the last century the 
registering fee for any brother made in the Lodge, was not paid 
until he had been raised. This custom was pleaded as an 
excuse for the non-payment of the fees in the case of a brother 
who had been initiated in 1794, but who had left Shrewsbury 
before he was a Master Mason. Needless to say Grand Lodge 
did not recognize the validity of this excuse, and the fee was 
duly paid. 

A purchase of the "Antiquities of Freemasonry," by 

1823. the Rev. G. Oliver, P.G. Chaplain for Lincoln, for the 
use of the Lodge, is an instance recorded in this year 

of the very commendable custom of our forefathers to keep the 
Lodge well supplied with Masonic literature. The Freemason's 
Pocket Book was always supplied to the Master, who was 
required to bring it with him to Lodge. Preston's Illustrations 
were bought when they first appeared, and many other like 
instances might be recorded. In the minutes of 117 the dates 
upon which books belonging to the Lodge were borrowed for 
perusal by the members may frequently be noticed, and I have 
little doubt that a similar method was adopted in 262. 



THE PEOVIKCK OP SHROPSHIRE. 157 

After the consideration of an application for 
relief received . from Hugh O'Neil, a prisoner in the 1823. 
County Goal, for selling goods without a license, the 
Secretary records — " The Lodge did not think him worthy, 
having offended against the Laws of the Country." 

Bro. Laurence presented the Lodge with a new set of 
collars, and the " Execution of the Sun and Moon in stained 
glass " was ordered. 

In May it was discovered that a brother had 
just been made the same evening as he had been 1824. 
balloted for, contrary to the provisions of a by-law 
passed a few years previously. The difficulty was, however, 
disposed of by passing a resolution to the effect that " the 
proceedings of this evening should not be deemed a precedent for 
future initiations." 

Bro. Evans, in August, was ordered to make "a new 
Moon." The fate of the old Moon does not appear on the 
minutes, but in a rough draft minute-book then kept by the 
Secretary, it is stated to have been " made into Stars." This 
remarkable astronomical occurrence is only intelligible when we 
remember that stained glass was the chief ingredient in the 
composition of the lunar orb referred to. 

In this and the following year the Lodge subscribed to 
the funds of " The Humane Society for the Recovery of drown'd 
persons," founded in Shrewsbury at this period. From the 
Chronicle we learn that the Society established a house on the 
river bank containing life saving apparatus, and all the usual 
appliances for restoring suspended animation. This Society must 
have been rather circumscribed in its efforts, as the field open to 
its operations was a rather limited one. 

In November a deputation was sent to The Honble. H. G. 
Bennett to know when he intended to be installed as Provincial 



l58 t^EEESiASOURY IlJ 



Grand Master. This was not an unnatural proceeding, 
1824. as five years had elaped since the date of his appoint- 
ment. The P.G.M. expressed to the Deputation " a 
wish to meet the Lodge if convenient to assemble on Friday the 
12th Day of December 1824, and that the delay that had 
occurred with resjDect to his installment arose from Domestic 
circumstances which prevented him attending as he wished to do 
to the Duties, but that it was his intention in the course of next 
year to be installed with all the Pomp and Ceremony usual on 
such occasions." The Lodge accordingly met on Nov. 12th, and 
resolved that the P.G.M. should be received " in a manner 
worthy of himself and worthy of the Salopian Lodge." Elaborate 
arrangements were made for his entertainment, but the Secretary 
while carefully recording these, unfortunately omits altogether to 
mention whether or not the P.G.M. ultimately arrived on the 
scene. 

At last, after repeated applications, a letter was received 
from the Grand Secretary, stating his " inability to inform when 
the first part of the Book of Constitutions would be printed, 
but when it did take place he would be sure to appr'ize the 
Lodge.'' This entry is followed by three distinct notes of 
interrogation, showing the opinion the brethren had upon the 
subject. Subsequent events, as has been already noticed, fully 
justified their incredulity, and the Lodge still waits for the 
arrival of this long paid for volume. 

About this period, the Secretary, much to his relief, I 
should imagine, found himself provided with printed summonses. 

The last event worth noting in the history of this year is 
the purchase of gauntlets by the Lodge for the use of the 
officers. A very long letter from a Bro. Whitney, P.P.G.W., 
Somerset, who appears to have been asked for information on the 
subject, has been preserved, and a portion of it may be here 
quoted. He says i^^ 



THE PROVINCE OF SHROPSHIRE. 159 

" It is usual with us, to have the gauntlets made out of the 
same leather as the gloves for all members, the officers excepted, 1824. 
according to this shape (diagram sketched showing glove and 
gauntlet in one piece). This gauntlet is made simply of stout white leather. 
The gauntlets worn by the officers, are with the Collars and Aprons furnished 
at the expense of the Lodge, -and of course considered a part of its property. 
It is detached from the glove in tlie following manner (diagram sketched 
showing gauntlet and glove as now worn by Provincial Grand Officers). With 
ns they are made of pasteboanl covered with sky blue silk to correspond in 
colour with the apron and collar and edged with silver lace * * The 
reason we have them unconnected with the glove is, that in case any officer 
be absent, the Brother who officiates for hiui has only to slip the gauntlet 
over his own gloves, without being obliged to wear gloves worn by other 
)5rethren « « j highly approve of the Standing Order of your 
Lodxe. Nothing gives so respectable an appearance to an assemblage of 
Hrethren — as uniformity of dress, especially black * * I sincerely 
hope you passed a pleasant day at the inauguration of your Prov. G. Master." 

There is no record of any such sfcandmg order being made, 
bub about this period some such regulation was being generally 
adopted by the Lodges. On the subject of Masonic clothing, I 
may mention that the Lodge now apparently bought aprons, and 
sold them to the initiates at a profit. This letter is dated 
Nov. 12th, so that Bro. Whitney (a relative of the then Lodge 
Sacretary) was misinformed about the inauguration of the P.G.M. 
on that day, as may be seen from what has been already said. 



Bro. Sir Andrew Vincent Corbet was W.M. in 
this year, and he seems to have made a vigorous effort 1825. 
to get a Masonic Hall built. A lodge was held on 
Jan. 31st to consider the question, and the sum of £320 was 
then and there subscribed amongst the brethren in £10 shares. 
The W.M. offered to supply the stone necessary for the purpose 
from his quarry at Grinshill ; the P.G.M. was written to, and he 
replied giving his approval to the scheme, and offering his 
assistance to forward the same. Plans were ordered to be 
prepared, and success seemed probable within a very short time, 
but some brethren objected to the scheme on the mistaken 
ground that the Lodge would be liable for the expense incurred, 
and so the erection of the Hall was "made a private trans- 
action,'' after which nothing more is heard about it. Other 
subsequent efforts to secure such a building in Shrewsbury have 



160 FREEMASONRY IN 



proved abortive, and its absence, sometimes greatly 

1825. felt, is a standing disgrace to the Masons of our 

town. 

A by-law, passed in 1820, enacted that no proposition 

carried at one Lodge should have the force of a Law 

until confirmed at the next meeting This practice, seems 

at this period to have been strictly enforced. A motion 

was duly carried in May "that two black beans and not one 

should in future be necessary to exclude a candidate proposed for 

initiation." When the motion came on in June for confirmation, 

it was rejected after a full discussion. 

The following entry (June 13th) illustrates another 
practice of the Lodge which has now quite disappeared. 

" Bro. Whitney propd. that Bro. Hodskinson be pass'd to 
the degree of a Fellow Craft next Lodge night, which was seed, 
by Bro. Davies. In consequence of the above proposition 
considerable discussion took place, and it appeared evident that 
it was considered in the Lodge an act of injustice to deviate 
from the usual practice so far as to admit one to be pass'd on a 
regular Lodge night, to the exclusion of others who may be 
equally qualified. That the question may be set at rest Bro. 
Whitney prop, that a by-law be made that in future no Br. 
should be pass'd or raised on a regular Lodge night — That not 
more than 3 Brs. should bs passed or raised on the same night — - 
That no passing and raising should take place on the same night, 
or in other words, that one brother should not be pass'd and 
another raised on the same night, and that on such nights of 
passing or raising, no business should be transacted in a lower 
degree than for which the Lodge was specially summoned." This 
was carried nem. con., and duly confirmed in July. It must be 
clearly understood that the by-law thus cii-cied introduced no 
innovation, but was merely a definite declaration of an ancient 
Lodge custom legally founded on the 6 th by-law passed in 
1788,(i) ijut which had been omitted from the by-laws passed in 

(1) See Appendix C. 



THE PROVINCE OF SHROPSHIRE. 161 

1820. Breaches of the custom may indeed be noted, 
but as a general rule the Lodge only worked the 1825. 
ceremonies of the 2nd and 3rd degrees in Lodges of 
Emergency, the expenses of which were borne by the brothers 
who were passed or raised thereat. The unfairness alluded to in 
the above entry is thus explained — for a brother passed or raised 
on a regular Lodge night escaped the expense which had to be 
borne by one passed or raised in a Lodge of Emergency. 

A commendable instance of strictness may be noticed in 
this year, as it is, I think, unique. On July 11th, "two brethren 
proposed to be passed, were, on examination, found not qualified," 
and two months elapsed before the degree was bestowed upon 
them. 

In October the brethren resolved to have oysters instead 
of hot suppers in future ; for how long a period this practice 
prevailed I cannot say. From this time, too, may be noted the 
custom of guaranteeing the caterer payment for a definite number 
of members, whether that number was actually present at the 
banquet or not. 

The Lodge was now for the first time illumin- 
ated with gas. The pipes for this purpose were laid 1826. 
down at the expense of the Lodge, but the gas was 
supplied gratis by Bro. Jones, the landlord of the Crown Inn. 

The following entry shows that the brethren used 
sometimes to have their supper after Lodge was opened, and 
resume work when supper was finished. — " Agreed, that no 
brother who was in the Lodge previous to its being called oif to 
supper, should leave the same immediately after supper, without 
having previously to its being so called off, had the permission of 
the W.M for that purpose " No instance of the performance of 
these ceremonies of "Calling off" and "Calling on" has taken 
place during recent years in the Salopian Lodge, except in 
connection with the Installation Ceremony. 



162 



rREEMASOSET IN 



A serious domestic disturbance must now be recorded. 

1826. In November the Inner Tyler was charged with an 
attempt to carry away wine, on false pretences, on the 

previous Festival of St. John, and with using gross impertinence 
to the Steward because he was prevented from so doing. The 
minute proceeds : — " N.B. — the pretence assigned was that the 
girls asked for it — the impertinence was calling the Steward a 
mischief-making meddling fellow, a shabby fellow, and many 
other words of the same import.'' The Tyler's defence was that 
" the girls (? waitresses) wanted some wine, and called the members 
a shabby set of fellows for not allowing them anything to drink, 
whereupon he had spoken to Bro. Thomas, who gave him two 
glasses of negus for them,'' and that this was what the Steward 
objected to. As Bro. Thomas vouched for the truth of this 
statement, Bro. Mallard was exonerated from the charge of 
stealing, but relations between the Steward and himself being 
necessarily rather unpleasant after what had occurred, his 
services were dispensed with for the future. Shortly afterwards 
he was again elected Inner Tyler, and served the Lodge most 
faithfully in that capacity for very many years. 

The election of officers was now changed to the month of 
November in each year. • 

A correspondence with Grand Lodge about subscrip- 

1827. tions to the Fund of Benevolence shows incidentally 
that there were 32 subscribing members in this 

year. 

A cushion and flannel waistcoats were provided for the 
comfort of initiates. 

All record of Bro. Colley's initiation was omitted by the 
Secretary, though he was duly proposed and accepted, and 
subsequently passed and raised. 

Owing to the increase of travellers at the Crown Inn, the 
Lodge was obliged to change its quarters after a tenancy of 



THE PROVINCE OF SHROPSHIRE. 163 

nearly 12 years. Once more it returned to the Fox. 
To enable the landlord to accommodate them, the 1827. 
Brethren advanced him £30 to build and fit up a room. 
The situation of the room thus built was at the back of the Inn, 
with an entrance from College Hill. After this move the Lodge 
initiated the landlord, Edward Oliver, but as Bro. Oliver never 
held any oflB.ce in the Lodge, his initiation was, by the Constitu- 
tions of 1815, quite regular. Before the Union it would have 
been irregular. An inventory of the furniture then taken has 
not been preserved. 

The Province was now once more without a P.GM.., and 
the Lodge after obtaining a dispensation direct from Grand 
Lodge to initiate a serving brother, wrote complaining of the 
situation of the Province, and soliciting instructions on the 
subject. 

A copy of " the very elegant and appropriate speech " 
made by the W.M., Bro. Samuel Johnson, at the first meeting of 
the Lodge at the Fox, was, on Oct. 6th, ordered to be inserted in 
the provincial papers. Expecting to derive some information 
therefrom, I have searched the files of the Chronicle from that 
date until the end of the year, but no trace of the speech is 
visible anywhere. 

The new Lodge room seems to have been built 
in such a manner as to cause an interruption of the 1828. 
access of light to the premises of a Mr. Wilding, who 
forthwith issued a writ against Bros. Oliver and Groves, the 
former as the owner of the Fox, and the latter as the builder of 
the room. The Lodge decided to take the opinion of Counsel in 
the matter, and a commmittee was appointed to draw up a case. 
Mr. Wilding was, however, not acting in a very hostile manner, 
and he shortly afterwards accepted the sum of £14 7s. 6d. in full 
satisfaction of all his claims. 

A silver tobacco box was in this year presented to 



164 FREEMASONRY IN 



Bro. Bassett " for his revered and esteemed services to 

1828. the Salopian Lodge." He joined the Lodge in 1788, 
and had been a subscribing member for 40 years. 

During that period he had always been a most regular attendant, 
and had filled the chair no less than six times. It was also 
arranged at the same time that, when the funds of the Lodge 
would allow of it, a similar compliment should be paid to Bros. 
Taylor and Oarline, who were both initiated in 1790, and had 
each also filled the chair six times. 

In October we find the Lodge again stirring in the 
matter of the appointment of a Provincial Grand Master. The 
other Lodges in the' Province were written to and invited to join 
the Salopian Lodge in their endeavours to get the ofiice filled up, 
and to share in the expense incident to such endeavours. These 
other Lodges were only three in number, viz. — 117 (whose 
minutes for this period have been lost), the Lodge of Industry, 
Bridgnorth, and the Mercian Lodge, Ludlow (which was finally 
dissolved in this very month, after a long period of inaction.) 

The money spent in building the new Lodge room, and 

1829. the payment to Mr. Wilding to avoid legal proceedings, 
seems to have exhausted the resources of the Lodge, 

and a very quiet year was consequently spent. No meeting was 
held from May 1st to Oct. 5th, and a strict determination not to 
run into debt is evinced by the following resolution, which was 
duly carried. Resolved — " That in future no proposition for the 
expenditure of any portion of the funds of the Lodge be taken 
into consideration until it has been ascertained that the Treas- 
urer has actually money in hand to defray the expenses thereof, 
exclusive of any arrears owing to the Lodge, and over and above 
any debts owing by the Lodge, as also the expenses of the night 
on which such proposition is made." Notwithstanding this rigid 
rule, the Lodge ended up the year indebted to its Treasurer in 
the sum of £9 5s. 8d. It is however quite evident, independently 
of all questions of finance, that the Lodge was now going down 



THE PROVINCE OP SHUOPSHIEE. 165 

hill rcipidly. Its members were decreasing largely by 
resignations, and few new members came forward to fill 1829. 
the vacant places. The average attendance was only 
about 9, and little or no work was done. 

The new year brought no sign of amelioration — 
the finances went from bad to worse, and work vanished 1830. 
utterly. The minute-book contains nothing beyond a 
bare list of the members present at Lodge, with the single 
exception of a proposal to dissolve the Lodge " owing to the 
inattention of several members to its duties." A Lodge of 
Emergency was called to consider this proposal, and the fact that 
only 9 members attended it, is in itself a proof of the low ebb to 
which matters had come. These nine were, however, all good 
men and true, and they unanimously resolved — "that the Lodge 
should not be dissolved, and that each Brother will use every 
means in his power to support it.'' 

The making of a solitary candidate in this year 
was but the last flicker of the candle, and in March it 1831. 
was proposed that " the Lodge do not meet again until 
called together by the W.M. (Bro. W. J. Clement), requesting, 
at the same time, that his Worship would endeavour to assemble 
the Brethren in such numbers as formerly." The next meeting 
was not held till November, and as it then appeared that many 
brethren had abstained from attending Lodge owing to its being 
held at the Fox Inn, a Committee was appointed to look out for 
a more agreeable place of meeting, and report their opinion to 
the next Lodge. This is the last entry in the Minute- 
book until Nov. 23rd, 1836, and as the minute of the 1832-6 
last mentioned date follows immediately after that of 
Nov. 15th, 1831, there can, I think, be little doubt that the 
Lodge did not meet during the interval. Sufficient vitality was 
however left in it to enable it to keep up some connection with 
Grand Lodge, and in 1838 when it applied for permission to 
celebrate its Centenary, sufficient evidence of that continuing 
connection was found in the Grand Lodge records, and the 



166 FUEEJIASONEY IN 



permission sought for was duly granted. Until the 
1832-6 recovery of the Treasurer's Account Book(i) for the 

period 1788-1843, no records in the possession of the 
Lodge threw the slightest light upon the darkness of this obscure 
period in its history. In this book there are, however, several 
entries which may be regarded as confirming the evidence 
unearthed in Freemasons' Hall, and, as they are quite unknown 
to any member of the Lodge, they are here given in extenso : — 

Postages— 23d Septr. &. 9 Nov. 1831 <fe 29 Feby. and 

6 Aug. 1832 3 4 

„ 5 Sept. & 5 Deer. 1832. 6 Mar. 24 Apl. 

1832 & 7 June 1832 4 2 

October 33. Goolden 5d. 1833. Aug. 12 & 

Dec. 4th 1833 2 1 

Nov. 13. 1833 10 

1833 

Nov. 19. — Remitted to Grand Lodge subscription 
from 18 Brethren to Fund of Ben- 
evolence for 1831 ... ... ... 1 16 

Do. Registering fees & certificate for 

Wm. Heighway Jones ... ... 17 

„ Subscription from 11 Brethren to 

Fund of Benevolence for 1832 ... 12 

Postages 

1834 5 March 30 April 3 December 2 6 

1835 23 March 29 April 2 Sept. & 2 Deer. ... 3 4 
1836-7 27 April and March 1. 1837 18 

1836 Nov. 23rd— Remitted to Grand Lodge for 

8 Brethren to the Fund of Benevolence 

for 3 years by payment of Bro Whitney 2 8 

In my opinion this page of figures indicates to a nicety 
the exact state of the case. The Lodge did not meet, but, though 
always in arrear with its payments to Grand Lodge, managed to 
pay sufficient to tide over the period when erasure must have 

(1) This book together with another kept by the Steward, was in the yenr 1891 
kindly entrusted to my care by Bro. G. J. Grroves, 117, for presentation to the 
Lodge. It had doubtless been in the possession of his grandfather, who was 
an old and valued member of the Lodge. 



THE PROVINCE OF SHROPSHIRE. 167 

been ever growing nearer, and, having escaped extinc- 
tion, on its resumption of work paid off all arrears. 1832-6 
The postages given in this list were undoubtedly paid 
on the Quarterly Communications from Grand Lodge, and the 
fact that the Treasurer paid them for live years is tolerably 
conclusive evidence that he, at all events, did not regard the 
Lodge as extinct by the mere fact of no meetings being held. 




168 FREEMASONRY IN 



Section III. (1836-1892). 



It was in. the year 1833, during the period of inaction 

1836. through which the Lodge passed, as mentioned at the 
close of the preceding section, that its number was 

changed to 328. At the same period The Salopian Lodge of 
Charity became 135. 

The first information we possess as to the resumption of 
work by the Lodge is contained in a minute of the meeting 
already referred to, which was held on Nov. 23rd, 1836. On 
this occasion the brethren present were Sir A. V. Corbet, Bart., 
William J. Clement, William Cooper, Junr., William Heighway 
Jones, John Carline, James Whitney, Thomas Groves, and 
Samuel Johnson. A communication having been read from 
Grand Lodge requiring the Lodge to pay the arrears due from it 
to the Fund of Benevolence, it was resolved that the Lodge 
should resume its meetings. A Committee was appointed to 
select a Lodge room, and in December the Raven Inn was 
selected. The Raven Inn was situated on the present site of the 
Raven Hotel. 

The arrears due to Grand Lodge were duly paid, a few 

1837. of the old members rejoined, and some candidates for 
initiation came forward ; meetings were regularly held, 

and the Lodge was soon placed on the firm footing which it has 
ever since retained. The day of meeting was changed to the 
second Monday in the month, and has never since been altered. 
From this date the names of members of 13-5 are frequently 
recorded as visitors, and on the Festival of St. John in December, 
appears the first instance of an interchange of civilities between 
the two Lodges, which continued to be practised in the same 
form for many years. The minute runs as follows: — "Bros. 



THE PROVINCE OF SHROPSHIRE, 169 

Horsman and Teece were requested to visit the Lodge 
No. 135, and oifer the brethren Brotherly Greeting. A 1837. 
deputation consisting of Bros. Drinkwater, Lea, and 
Owen from Lodge 135 visited us and gave Brotherly Greeting." 
The entire minutes of this year are copied out a second time into 
the Secretary's book, verbatim in all important particulars with 
those immediately preceding. The solitary variation is that the 
year is always written 1838 instead of 1837. As the minutes 
for 1838 follow immediately in proper order, it is impossible to 
explain how such a mistake could have been made. The Secretary 
would have been better employed in noting the election of officers 
for the following year, which he has omitted to do, 

In July, 1838, Bro. Samuel Wood, then House 
Surgeon at the Salop Infirmary, was initiated. His 1838. 
name is still familiar to all Salopians. While still an 
Entered Apprentice he was elected Secretary, but, notwithstand- 
ing his inexperience, the minutes kept by him show a distinct 
advance on those of many of his predecessors. The practice in 
each Lodge of confirming the minutes of the preceding one was 
now first adopted, and now also for the first time we find it 
regularly recorded that the Lodge was " closed in form and 
harmony," words which shortly afterwards were changed into 
those with which we are now familiar. 

The Lodge was again moved from the Raven to the Lion 
Inn, and, as it now contained 21 subscribing members, the funds 
permitted a resumption of the banquets, which since 1836 had 
not been held regularly. It may be noticed that visitors at 
these banquets were still required to pay their proper share of 
the expenses, as if they had been full members. 

The last instance in which the interference of the Lodge 
was requested for the purpose of settling a quarrel between two 
members is recorded in this year. As the quarrel was over a 
disputed account, it is little wonder that the Lodge refused to 
meddle in the matter. 



170 FREEMASONRY IN 



The Earl of Zetland, Pro. Grand Master, having died 
1839. in this year, the Lodge went into mourning. The 

Public Rooms in the Market Square, now known as the 
Music Hall Buildings, were commenced in March. The Lodge 
was invited to be present at the laying of the Foundation Stone 
by the Honble. Thomas Kenyon, but refused the invitation on 
the ground that the Constitutions of the Order did not allow 
Masons to appear as such in an unmasonic ceremony. 

In April the name of " Bro. Price (? initiated 1814) of 
Salopian Lodge of St. John 328 " appears as a visitor. An old 
member of the Lodge who was then not a subscribing member is 
clearly referred to, but this is the only place in the whole records 
of the Lodge where the words " of St. John " are added to its 
original title — " The Salopian Lodge." I am, however, informed 
by a very old member of the staff of the Shrewsbury Chronicle, 
that when he first joined the office of that paper, circulars were 
frequently printed for some Lodge of St. John, which was then 
considered the premier Lodge in the Province. This could not 
apply to the Lodge of St. John, Wellington, which was not 
founded until 1852, and must refer to some page in the history 
of the Salopian Lodge which is completely blotted out from its 
■records. 

In May we find the brethren had invested in an organ 
which cost nearly £22. As further evidence of increasing 
luxury may be noticed the fact that the hour of meeting was 
changed to 5 o'clock, and dinners instead of suppers were 
regularly provided. Dinner seems to have been partaken of 
before lodge was opened, for, in November, a discussion took 
place as to whether it would be pleasant or advisable " that any 
brother be allowed to bring a friend, not being a Mason, to dine 
with the Brethren ; the Brother introducing him paying all his 
expenses,'' and the conclusion arrived at was that as such a 
visitor would have to leave immediately after dinner, " it could 
not be pleasant to him, nor would it be agreeable to the Brethren." 



THE PROVINCE OF SHROPSHIRE. 171 



A miaute of a lodge held on Dec. 9tli records 
that " Bro. Grenville Jones presented an Antique ring 1839. 
dug up in a Held near Haughmond Abbey, which 
appears to have been a signet ring, and on which is the following 
inscription surrounding a Death's Head and cross Bones above 
which is an Hour Glass with a pair of wings, and on either side 
a mattock and spade, supposed to have been a signet ring of one 
of the Abbots of Haughmond Abbey. — To be worn by the W.M. 
on all Lodge nights, and used as a signet ring by the Lodge. — 
The ring has on the inside the letters W.L." A rough pen and 
ink sketch is drawn in the minute book, which corresponds with 
the above description. The inscription referred to is — qualis 
VITA FINIS ITA. Bro. GrenviUe Jones is dead, and it has been 
impossible to discover under what circumstances the ring was 
found. In the " Transactions of the Shropshire Archaeological 
Society "(i) will be found an article by the Rev. W. A. Leighton 
on " Three Ancient Rings found in Shropshire," one of which 
was the ring in question. The account given by that learned 
Antiquarian is as follows: — "Among the ruins of Haghmon 
Abbey, Co. Salop, some years ago, was found a gold seal-ring, 
massive, but of clumsy form, the broad rounded oblong face of 
which bore in shallow incisions the following device. In the 
centre a human skull, frontal view, below which was a thigh 
bone lying horizontally, and on the right side a pick-axe and on 
the left a shovel ; above the skull an hour glass with a candle- 
stick and taper on either side and a pair of expanded wings ; 
around the verge the motto qualis vita finis ita. Within the 
hoop were the initials W.L. As the above emblems of mortality 
and the motto were, identical with similar ones existing on the 
monument of Sir William Leighton, Chief Justice of Worth 
Wales in the time of Elizabeth, in the Chancel of Cardington 
Church, Co. Salop, coupled with the initials, there could be no 
doubt in appropriating it to the Judge. It was no doubt one of 
the rings which it was the custom of those times for Barristers . 
when raised to the rank of Serjeants-at-Law to present to each 

. . : -^ 

(I) Part 2 Vol. 2 pag6 2S0 (April 1878). 



172 PHEEMASONRY IN 



of the Judges of that time, and this particular ring was 
1839. probably that presented to his contemporary Richard 

Barker, Recorder of Shrewsbury and Judge of North 
Wales, whose family then resided at Haghmon Abbey, and 
whose brother, Rowland Barker, of Haghmon, had married for 
his second wife, Cecilia, daughter of Sir Edward Leighton, of 
Wattlesborough." There seems no reason to doubt the substan- 
tial accuracy of this passage, and the Lodge tradition pointing to 
a monastic origin may be considered as untenable. Sir William 
Leighton, it may be added, died in the year 1607, which date 
gives an approximate idea of the age of the ring. In the 
Volume from which the foregoing quotation is taken there are 
two engravings of the ring, made from a wax impression obtained 
by Mr. Leighton when it was exhibited in the Museum formed 
by the Archaeological Institute, on their visit to Shrewsbury in 
1855. A comparison of these engravings with the sketch in the 
minute book shows several discrepancies. The latter omits the 
candlesticks and tapers, and has two cross-bones instead of a 
single horizontal one. Mr. Leighton asserts that from the wax 
impression taken by him " an electrotype was made which is 
now the only existing representative of the lost ring,'' but his 
statement is inaccurate, as another impression in wax and a 
sketch of the ring had been taken by Bro. S. Wood at the time 
of its presentation. As some members of the Lodge may not be 
aware of the fact, I may mention that during the Ceremony of 
the Installation of our W.M. Elect, the I.P.M. takes a ring from 
his finger and places it on the linger of the W.M. Elect, who, 
during his year of office, should wear it on all Masonic occasions, 
and use it as a signet ring on all Lodge business. The ring now 
used in this ceremony is a copy of that presented by Bro. 
Grenville Jones, the original having been unfortunately lost 
during the Mastership of Bro. Niccolls in 1862. This copy was 
made from the wax impression and sketch in the possession of 
Bro. S. Wood. It differs from the engravings already referred 
to in not showing the candlestick and taper on either side of the 
hour glass. A similar remark applies to some impressiona 




The PBOVllfCE OP SHROPSHIRE. 173 

in wax, presumably of the original ring, given to 

Mr. H. "W. Adnitt of Shrewsbury by Mr. Leighton, 1839. 

and it must, therefore, be a matter of considerable 

doubt whether the engravings are accurate 
in this respect. The accompanying woodcut 
is a reproduction of the larger one contained 
in the Transactions of the Shropshire 
Archaeological Society. In one respect the 
present ring is undoubtedly inaccurate ; at 
the back of the seal the letters W.M. are 

engraved, and these certainly ought to be W.L. 

On April 13th Bro Joshua P. White was 
initiated. The name of Bro. White is one that will 1840. 
long be held in loving remembrance by the members of 
the Salopian Lodge. Sprung from a Masonic family (both his 
great uncle and uncle were, in their respective generations. 
Grand Secretary), he early in life joined the Lodge, to which he 
continued a subscribing member until the day of his death in 
1890. He thus completed the Jubilee of his connection with 
the Lodge before the G.A O.T.U called him away from our midst. 

On the same evening as Bro. White was initiated 
arrangements were made for sending a Committee to London to 
try and obtain a Royal Arch Chapter in connection with the 
Lodge. This Committee consisted of Bros. J. Carline, S.W., 
Saml. Wood, J.W., T. Carline, W.M., C. B. Teece, and 
J. Whitney. The result of their efforts will be noted later on. 

The brethren were again dissatisfied with their accommo- 
dation at the Lion, and eventually determined to meet for the 
future in a room then situate on premises at the rear of the spot 
upon which the New Fire Office in High Street is now being 
built. This room was accordingly fitted up at considerable 
expense. 

The dissatisfaction felt by the Salopian Lodge about the 



174 FEEEMASONRY IN 



non-appointment of a P.G.M. seems to have spread to 
1840. the other Lodges in the County, as in September the 
Anchor and Hope Lodge, Woore, 644, sent round a 
memorial upon the subject. 

In this year a subscription of one guinea was given to 
the Testimonial to be presented to Bro. Robt. T. Crucifix, M.D., 
P.J.G.D. Bro. Crucifix was the originator of the Asylum 
Scheme for the assistance of aged Freemasons. 

It is sad to relate that in December a brother resigned on 
the ground of "want of leisure and inclination to penetrate 
further into the mysteries of the Craft " ; he had been passed, 
but not raised. No record of his rejoining the Lodge exists, but 
he must have done so, as he acted as W.M. many years 
afterwards. 

From the Treasurer's accounts we find the Lodge paid for 
the erection of a monument over the grave of Bro. Thomas who 
had recently died. 

Bro. J. P. White was secretary for the year though 
184L only an Entered Apprentice. His duties were, however, 

light, as nothing of interest took place, and no lodges 
were held in the summer months. Two separate attempts were 
made to found a Lodge of Instruction, but Shrewsbury was not 
destined to possess such a valuable Institution for many years to 
come. It is clear, however, that the Salopian Lodge had 
recognized the utility of such a Lodge, without which work must 
often be slovenly and inaccurate. 

The Lodge now appears in the character of a Landlord; 
1842. early in the year negotiations were entered into with 

the Shrewsbury Glee Club for the use by its members 
of one of the Lodge rooms. The terms offered were £5 per annum 
for the lower room and £8 for the upper one. The Treasurer 
received £4 for the "rent of cottage," but this sum was, I think, 
rent for some small building attached to the Lodge rooms. 



THE PROVINCE OP SHROPSHIRE. 175 

Another purchase of gauntlets shows that the 
officers still wore these appendages. The time when 1842, 
they ceased to be worn is not recorded in the minute 
books. 

A proposal was carried in April that " a little ale be 
procured on every regular Lodge night, for the refreshment of 
the labouring brethren." This, it is presumed, meant for 
consumption during the time lodge was open and work actually 
in progress, for the refreshment department at the banquets 
seems to have been conducted in the usual manner. 

It is curious to note that on the Festival of St. John, 
Bro. J. P. "White, who was unable to attend, sent Bro. Clement, 
who was not then a subscribing member, to fill the post of Senior 
Deacon. Bro. Clement apparently found this opportunity for 
Masonic duty pleasant, as he immediately afterwards rejoined 
the Lodge. 

Pecuniary difficulties were at this period very 
great, and many Lodges of Emergency and various 1843. 
Committee meetings were held to consider the matter. 
The causes of this straitness of means are easily found, as the 
Lodge had for two or three years been undoubtedly living far 
beyond its income. The rent, coal, and taxes for the new Lodge 
Room in High Street amounted to over £30 per annum, which 
was nearly if not quite as much as the total amount subscribed 
by the members, leaving no margin for charity, refreshment, and 
incidental expenses. In addition, the cost of furnishing the Room 
had been very great, and as a consequence at the end of the 
year a balance of nearly £70 was due to the Treasurer. Under 
these circumstances another move became essential, and the 
Lodge returned to the Raven and Bell Inn. A subscription list, 
which ultimately produced £18, was opened ; several brethren 
forgave the Lodge small bills owed to them ; some articles of 
non-masonic furniture were sold ; arrears were collected as far as 
possible ; and a strict Course of economy was begun. It is 



176 FKEKMASONRY IN 



pleasant to be able to record that these measures were 
1843. effectual, and by the close of the year 1843 the debt 

of £70 due to the Treasurer was converted into a 
credit balance in his hands amounting to £1 12s. 9d. It is 
evident from a study of the history of this period that the 
brethren were deeply attached to the Lodge, and determined at all 
costs to keep it in existence. In the many meetings held not a 
single suggestion was ever made that it should be discontinued. 
All worked together manfully and made the necessary pecuniary 
sacrifices, and the difficulty was disposed of triumphantly. It 
seems that apart from pecuniary questions the move was a wise 
one. The rooms were very damp and unhealthy, and in 
consequence many members refused to attend. The landlords, 
too, recognized only one duty as incident to the ownership of 
property, namely that of receiving their rent regularly. 

On May 3rd the Lodge forwarded through Bro. Sir A. V. 
Corbet, a letter of condolence to Grand Lodge on the death of 
the Duke of Sussex, G.M. I have already indicated how 
important a part this Royal Brother had played in the Union of 
the rival Grand Lodges in 1813, and his efforts for the good of 
the Craft fully deserved the recognition which they always 
received from the hands of our Masonic ancestors. 

Bro. Sir A. V. Corbet was at this time, as I have already 
noticed, D.P.G.M. ; a week later he was asked by the Lodge if 
he would accept the office of P. G.M. should he be appointed 
thereto. At first he seemed inclined so allow himself to be 
nominated, but ultimately changed his mind, and declined to act 
even after his patent had been sent to him. 

A Bro. Nash was in May paid £2 10s. for lectures ; what 
the subject of these lectures was I cannot say, as the Secretary 
passed them over in silence. Two of his best known lectures on 
the "Ladder of Jacob" and "Mount Moriah" are mystical 
harangues which scarcely repay perusal. 



THE PROVINCE OP SHROPSHIRE. 177 

About the same time the Lodge took a guinea 
ticket in the Distribution of the Masonic Fair at Bath, 1843. 
but was not successful in winning the magnificent 
Masonic furniture, costly jewels, organ, &c. then drawn for, 
which had originally been purchased at a cost of £645 15s. Od., 
and used at the Consecration of the Royal Sussex Lodge. 

The attempt to obtain a Royal Arch Chapter in connection 
with the Lodge was now seriously undertaken and ultimately 
proved successful. The Petitions to Grand Chapter then 
prepared are full of information ; they are given verbatim, in 
connection with the history of the Chapter, at a subsequent page. 

Nothing of interest occurred in the year 1844, 
being the second in succession in which the chair was 1844-5. 
occupied by Bro. S. Wood. 

In the beginning of 1845 the brethren went to Wenlock 
to attend the funeral of Bro. Hinton. 

A brother who applied for a recommendation to the 
Benevolent Fund had to be refused as his subscription was in 
arrear ; and, " having no further call upon their influence, the 
votes and interest of the Lodge for the same fund were left in 
the hands of the Grand Secretary.'' The same plan was 
subsequently often adopted. 

In March it was regularly proposed and carried " that 
any Mason not a Member of the Lodge, may be passed or raised 
in the Lodge after due notice, for the sum of £2 10s. Od." Two 
instances at least might be given of this having been done in 
previous years, although no by-law or regulation of the Lodge 
allowed of it. The lease of the Old Lodge Room in High Street, 
continued to be still a source of trouble, as the Landlords held 
the Lodge liable for the rent. A committee appointed in 1844 
to settle the matter having neglected to do so was reproached by 
the Lodge for their lukewarmness, but eventually cleared them- 
selves of this charge, and induced the landlords to cancel the 

w 



178 FREEMASONHT IN 



lease " on payment of £30 from those brethren who 
1844-5. were members of the Lodge at the time the unfortunate 

deed was executed, together with the further sum of 
£Q 10s. derived from the sale of old furniture." Bro. H. T. 
Wace, who was chosen as W.M. for the ensuing year, declined 
the honour on the ground of illness, and Bro. J. P. White was 
elected in his place. Bro. Wace was initiated in 1838, acted as 
W.M. in 1847, was appointed P.G.S. of Works on the formation 
of the Province in 1852, and is now the only living officer 
appointed on that occasion. 

A serious family squabble seems in this year to have 

1846. upset the harmony of the Lodge. As a consequence 
five resignations, three of which were contained in one 

envelope, were received in one day. The cause of this disturb- 
ance cannot be exactly described, even if it were desirable to do 
so. This much, however, seems clear, that the dissension arose 
because some members felt that transactions in public life of 
which they did not approve, rendered those taking part in such 
transactions unfit for Lodge honours. 

A subscription was raised to present Bro. Thomas Groves, 
who was then Mayor of Shrewsbury, with his portrait. The 
portrait proved to be an excellent likeness, and after hanging 
on the walls of the Lodge room for several years, was ultimately 
presented to Bro. Groves, and it is now in the possession of his 
family. 

The minutes for several lodges held in this year contain 
the names of visitors from the Roden Lodge, Wem, which had 
just been warranted. This Lodge we know from other sources 
had a very short active existence, and all mention of it ceases in 
the same year, though it was not formally erased till 1859. 

Contemporary history is illustrated by an entry which 

1847. records the payment by the Lodge in February of a 
subscription of one guinea towards " the relief of the 

Irish and Scotch districts suffering from the scarcity of food." 



THE PROVINCE 01" SHROPSHIRE. iTi) 

The failure of the potato crop, a fruitful source of 
trouble in the Sister Isle, was in this year almost 1847. 
complete, and great distress was the natural result. 

The Lodge we learn incidentally was at this period in 
possession of 48 votes for the Benevolent Fund, which, following 
the precedent established in 1845, were left in the hands of the 
Grand Secretary to use as he thought fit. 

In December the Lodge wrote to the other Lodges in the 
Province on the subject of the non-appointment of a P.G.M. 
The entry relative to this matter has been fully considered in 
the Provincial History, but I may here, perhaps, repeat that it is 
chiefly interesting as showing that only three Lodges in all were 
in working order at this date, viz. — 262, 117, and the Roden 
Lodge, Wem. 

Very little of any interest took place during this 
period. Lodges were not held very regularly, and few 1848-50 
members attended to their Masonic duties. In Jan., 
1848, only three members and the Tyler attended ; the Lodge 
was, nevertheless, opened in the 3rd degree, bnt no work was 
done. 

In 1849 the sum of £3 3s. Od. was voted towards a 
testimonial to Bro. Wm. Henry White, G.S. Bro. White had 
on several occasions placed the Lodge under great obligations to 
him. He was most active in supporting the Petition for the 
Chapter in 1843, and subsequently presented to the joint 
Province of North Wales and Shropshire the handsome Sword 
now in the possession of the Province of Shropshire. The Rev. 
E. H. Dymock, afterwards for many years D.P.G.M., was elected 
W.M. for the year 1851. 

In February, 1851, occurs the first mention of 
the name of the late R.W.P.G.M., Sir Watkin Williams 1851. 
Wynn, Bart. In that month the Lodge invited him to 
allow himself to be nominated for the ofiice he afterwards filled 



180 



PEEEMASOIfRY IM 



SO successfully, and, in December, when a visitor, 
1851. an intimation was received from him that he would 
accept the post if appointed. 

In this year, also, was consummated a most curious incident 

in the history of the Lodge, namely, the amalgamation with the 

Salopian Lodge of Charity ; the joint Lodge thus formed 

retaining both Warrants. The minute books of both Lodges are 

strangely silent as to the reasons for and negotiations previous to 

this amalgamation. It appears, however, that on the 5th of 

May a meeting of the subscribing members of both Lodges was 

held for the purpose of taking into consideration measures best 

calculated to promote the speedy union of the two Lodges. At 

this meeting Bro. J. N. Heathcote, W.M., 135, and Bro. E. H. 

D3m!iock, 328, presided. A resolution having been carried that 

the amalgamation would materially benefit Freemasonry in the 

County, a series of regulations for the management of the joint 

Lodge were made. Of these I may quote four — 

l.st — "That the Salopian Lodge, 328, should have priority of number and 
take precedence of the Salopian Lodge of Charity." 

2nd — " That Bro. Dymock should continue in the chair until his year of 
office should expire, and that Bro. Heathcote should succeed him." 

3rd — " That after the proposed amalgamationi in the event of a distant dis- 
solution, an Arbitrator should be chosen from among the Brethren 
representing the interests of each Lodge to decide upon the meiits of 
the evidence produced, whose decision should be considered iiual." 

4th — " That an inventory of the property belonging to each Lodge should be 
taken and numbered, and that such of the Lodge furniture of No. 
133 should be used in the Amalgamated Lodge as should be 
required ; that the remainder be safely put aside, with this under- 
standing, that, in the event of a separation, each Lodge shouhl 
claim and be allowed by the arbitrators its own furniture, and be 
placed on exactly the same position regarding the Jewels and 
Furniture as before the amalgamation." 

Upon these terms the union took place, and took effect 
from the October meeting of 328. Frotn that date the minute 
books contain the names of brethren of 135 present at and 
voting in the proceedings of the Salopian Lodge. The presence 
of these names in such an informal way renders it very difficult 
to obtain an absolutely correct list of the bona fide members of 
the latter Lodge. 



THE PROVINCE OP SHROPSHIRE. I8l 

In January a Committee of the two Lodges was 
formed to consider new by-laws for the joint Lodge, but 1852. 
it is doubtful if this Committee ever proceeded to work, 
for in February we find the first traces of the dissolution of the 
union. It was then proposed to hold a Lodge of Emergency at 
the end of the month to consider the whole question of the 
amalgamation. This was accordingly done, and a resolution 
carried unanimously thereat " that the "Warrant of 135 be given 
with a sufficiency of furniture for carrying on the said Lodge to 
any number of Brethren not less than seven who may be 
approved of by the Brethren of Lodge 328." The reason for this 
sudden dissolution is stated in a pencil note at the end of the 
minute book to have been due to a private communication from 
the Grand Secretary, to the effect that the amalgamation was 
illegal. Living witnesses of the event have, however, informed 
me that the first steps towards separation were taken at the 
instigation of Sir Watkin Wynn, who, in preparing, as he then 
was, for the post of Provincial Grand Master, could not but 
regret the loss of precedence to the Province involved in the 
probable erasure of such a low number as 13-5 from the roll of 
Lodges under his care. On the separation being effected, it is 
clear that many of the former members of 135 preferred to 
remain under the banner of 328, and, as a consequence, the former 
Lodge was for some time in a precarious condition. At its first 
meeting in March it was, however, intimated that several 
members of 328 had joined it to help to keep it going until more 
prosperous times set in. These joining members were welcomed 
warmly and admitted for a very small subscription. In a very 
few years No. 135 was in full working order again, and has ever 
since continued to flourish. This amalgamation was, I believe, 
the foundation of the real feeling of friendliness existing between 
the two Lodges — a friendliness never disturbed by the petty 
jealousies and squabbles so common between two Lodges in a 
small town. 

The establishment of the Provincial Grand Lodge of 



182 FREEMASONRY IN 



Shropshire and North Wales caused a great influx of 

1852. joining members about this period. The Salopian 
Lodge was evidently then regarded as the leading 

Lodge, and the chief avenue leading to Provincial honours. 
As a consequence it may be noted that the Lodge had for 
the following few years more subscribing members than at 
any other period of its existence. In 1852 there were at least 
55 on the roll. The influence of the P.G.M. was soon apparent 
in the higher social position of the new members of the Lodge. 
During the period 1850 to 1870 it may safely be asserted that 
scarcely one of the Shropshire County families was without a 
representative belonging to the Craft. 

On Dec. 29th the two Shrewsbury Lodges with the then 
newly established Lodge at Admaston (now 601) joined in 
celebrating the Festival of St. John. On this occasion 51 
brethren attended the banquet. 

The gift of two guineas from the Mayor of Shrewsbury 

1853. to the Widows and Orphans Fund is worth recording, 
as His Worship was not a member of the Craft. His 

example in this respect is imitated more rarely than it deserves 
to be. 

The initiation fee was now raised to 5 guineas. 

In April Bro. Walter Reginald Corbet, son of Sir A. V. 
Corbet, was initiated just before he left England for the Crimea. 
The next time he was heard of by the Lodge was when the sad 
intelligence arrived that he had died on his way home again. 

On October 26th was held the first Provincial Grand 
Lodge meeting in Shrewsbury since the date of the installation 
of the P.G.M. The Lodge worked two initiations and a passing, 
so that with the Provincial business a heavy afternoon's work 
was got through. In this and the previous years Grand Masonic 
Balls were held in Shrewsbury, the attendance in both instances 
being exceedingly large. 



THE PROVINCE OF SHROPSHIRE. 183 

When the Auditors had examined the Lodge 
accounts for 1853, it was found that the Treasurer 1854. 
had in his hands a balance of £108. Of this sum 10 
guineas was sent to the Masonic Institution for Boys, and private 
subscriptions amounting to 25 guineas were added thereto; £10 
was also voted to the Patriotic Fund raised for our Crimean 
Army. A considerable part of the balance was spent in laying 
down wine for the use of the Lodge, a cellar to store it in, at the 
Raven and Bell Inn, being provided only upon payment of a 
heavy corkage fee. This was the beginning of the Lodge cellar. 
It is evident from the report of the Wine Committee on this 
occasion, that the Brethren then, as now, had a weakness for 
Port. The Wine " Whip " at this time seems to have varied in 
amount accovding to the quantity consumed. — No wine, it may 
be noticed, was allowed to be taken from the cellar after 10 p.m. 

Bro. Guise, in October, presented the Lodge with a floor 
cloth prepared from a beautiful design by Bro. Randal. 

Bro. Heathcote was presented with a P.M. jewel and 
plate, with a suitable inscription, for his services to the Lodge. 

Bro. Churchill the W.M. who had been seriously 
ill for some time, died on Jan. 9th, during the time 1855. 
the Lodge was at work. On his decease, Bro. Guise 
was elected to fill the vacant chair, and at the next meeting the 
Lodge appeared in Masonic mourning. The round bottomed 
decanters now in the possession of the Lodge were a present 
from Bro. Churchill. Bros. Chandler and Andrew, old and 
respected members of the Lodge, also died on a Lodge night, as 
many of my readers will doubtless remember. 

The Lodge was again in mourning in October on account 
of the death of Bro. Sir A. V. Corbet, who survived but a short 
time the death of his son already noticed. Bro. Corbet had been 
a subscribing member from his initiation in 1820, and had 
always taken a keen interest in all that concerned the Craft. 



184 FREEMASONRY IN 



In August a great Masonic picnic was held on the 

1855. Wrekin. Masonic festivities were at this time largely 
patronized. 

The following minute is a curious one — •" The Lodge being 
in the 3rd degree it was then called back to the 1st degree in 
order to elect a Master for the ensuing year, when the present 
W.M. (Bro. Guise) was unanimously re-elected and received the 
congratulations of the Brethren, and the Lodge being recalled to 
its duties in the 3rd degree, the W.M. was installed and received 
the usual honours. The Lodge was then closed down to the 1st 
degree." The power vested in the W.M. of a Lodge to "call 
back" into a lower degree, is, I think, rarely used in Shropshire. 

In January, a P.M. jewel, purchased out of the Lodge 

1856. funds, was presented to Bro. J. L. Rowland for his 
valuable services as Secretary. The Brethren of the 

Lodge may be interested to hear that Bro. Rowland in addition 
to being a good Mason, was an excellent amateur wood carver, 
and that to his skill and kindness they are indebted for the 
handsome snuff box they now occasionally use. 

In many Lodges held during the year lectures on the 
tracing boards were given by the W.M. (Bro. Guise), in the 
absence of any regular work — a practice which might well be 
adopted more frequently in the present day. 

The Festival of St. John in December was not celebrated 
till the following month, when the R.W.P.G.M. and many of his 
officers honoured the Lodge with their presence. 

Bro. Dovaston was initiated in this year — he is now the 
senior subscribing member of the Lodge. 

The Lodge now again changed its quarters from the 

1857. Raven and Bell Inn to the Lion Hotel. In March 
Bro. Guise was presented with a P.M. jewel. He 

thoroughly deserved this compliment as he had worked and 
continued to work well for the Lodge and also for the Province. 



THE PROVINCE OP SHROPSHIRE. 185 

The Brethren seem about this thne to have lost 
their taste for music, as they decided they had no 1857. 
longer any use for the organ, and presented it to Bro. 
Bloxam, who had for many years filled the post of Organist. 

A Provincial Grand Lodge was held in Shrewsbury on 
August 8th, it was, as then usual, held in a Craft Lodge. The 
method seems to have been this — The Craft Lodge having been 
duly opened by its officers, the R.W.P.G.M. attended by his 
Officers entered in procession. The P.G. Officers then assumed 
the posts vacated by the Lodge Officers, and the P.G. Lodge was 
duly opened — and, when its business was finished, duly closed. 
The P.G. Officers then retired, and the Craft Lodge work was 
resumed. 

In October the Brethren assembled in mourning for Bro. 
Rowland who had just died. 

In January the following entry occurs : — " The 
Lodge was then opened in the 2nd degree and almost 1858. 
immediately afterwards was closed in that degree. 
Bro. Riou Benson having answered the necessary questions then 
retired and the Lodge again opened in the 2nd degree." This 
indicates a small mistake in ritual which will be easily recognized. 

Bro. Charles George "VVingfieldy whose recent death is so 
universally regretted, joined the Lodge in this year, and remained 
a subscribing member until his death. 

On April 5th Wynnstay, the residence of the R.W.P.G.M , 
was burnt to the ground, and on the 12th of the same month an 
address of condolence was sent to him by the Lodge. The 
following passage from this address sufficiently indicates the 
feelings of the Brethren : — 

" But one sentiment pervaded the hearts of all the Bretlu-en present, 
and it showed itself by an unanimous desire to express to j-on Right Worship- 
ful Sir our feelings of sincere sympathy, earnest condolence, and heartfelt 
thankfulness ; sincere sympathy with you in having now to look upon the 
ashes of that noble pile of building so dear to you from the earliest 

X 



186 FREEMASONRY IN 



associations and ancient family recollections and so suddenly 

1858. reduced to ashes by the ruthless flames— earnest condolence at the 
enormous loss (yea in many things irreparable) of so vast an 

amount of valuable property — and above all our heaitful thankfulness that 
under God"s Good Providence you yourself and Lady Wynn and the guests 
and inmates of your House, have been preserved alive amid the perils of that 
fearful night." 

In the following month this address was suitably 
acknowledged by the R.W.P.G.M. 

The by-law referring to the election of new members was 
in this year altered — it being then finally settled, as is now the 
law, that one blackball in ten should exclude any proposed 
candidate. 

An election to the post of Physician to the Salop 

1859. Infirmary took place early in this year. The vote of 
the Lodge was " left to the W.M. to vote as he may 

think proper." 

The Lodge, owing to the Lion being without a tenant, now 
moved to the Raven Hotel. Considerable difficulty was 
experienced as to the proper disposal of the Lodge wine, as the 
Raven authorities refused to store it. Ultimately it was sold by 
private auction amongst the members, and with part of the 
proceeds a quantity of new furniture and jewels was purchased. 

A new by-law was now added to those already existing. 
It provided " that it shall be one of the duties of the W.M. 
regularly to attend the Quarterly Communication of Grand 
Lodge, or in his stead a P.M. or one of his Wardens as he may 
deem fit to appoint. The travelling expenses being borne by the 
Lodge Fund." 

An old minute book, entrusted to Bro. Oakley for 

1860. presentation to the Lodge, was gladly accepted. This 
book cannot now be identified. 

A Finance Committee sat in the latter part of the year, 
but their report is not given by the Secretary. One result 



THE PROVINCE OF SHEOPSHIRE. 187 

of this report is, however, discernible in the fact 
that the compulsory attendance of the W.M. at the 1860. 
Quarterly Communications was now reduced to twice 
in the year. 

The R.W.P.G.M. honoured the Lodge with his presence 
on the Festival of St. John in December. His attendance at the 
Installation Ceremony was very constant. 

On a further consideration of the new by-law 
referring to the attendance of the W.M. at Grand 1861. 
Lodge, it was entirely rescinded. 

A vote for 15 years for the Royal Masonic Benevolent 
Institution was purchased by the efforts of Bro. Onions, who 
exerted himself to collect from the Brethren the sum necessary 
for that purpose. The portrait of Bro. Groves already referred 
to was now presented to him. 

The costly and handsome set of mauls at present 
used by the Lodge was in this year presented by Bro. 1862. 
H. V. Jones, and a record of his kindness was entered 
on the minutes. 

Bro. Brightwell, who had for many years filled the post 
of Treasurer in the most able manner, was voted an acknowledg- 
ment of his services; a presentation was also made to him, but of 
what nature is not recorded. The sum of £10 was also given to 
the Lancashire Relief Pund. The old ring, presented by Bro. 
Granville Jones in 1839, was lost by the W.M. whilst on a visit 
to London, and a copy had to be procured as already mentioned, 
but this was not done till 1865. 

A Provincial Grand Lodge was held in the 
Salopian Lodge in January. 1863. 

From this year the meeting of the Lodge in May was 
discontinued, and the present system of meeting only in the 
months from October to April was adopted. 



188 FEEEMASONRY IN 



The last formal renumbering of all the Lodges was now 

1863. carried out by Grand Lodge. In this renumbering the 
Salopian Lodge 328 became 262. 

Bro. Wingfield was in this year W.M. At his installa- 

1864. tion 43 subscribing members of the Lodge were present. 
This is the largest number of subscribing brethren ever 

present in the history of the Lodge. 

A proposition that " members living more than ten miles 
from Shi'ewsbury and who had been subscribers for ten years, 
should only pay for the future a subscription of 5/- per annum, 
and 5/- for each banquet attended by them," was almost 
unanimously negatived. 

From this date the dues were paid yearly instead of 
quarterly. 

Bro. Cureton, who was now a very old man, and had acted 
as Tyler for many years, was granted an allowance of 31- a week 
for the remainder of his life. He did not long enjoy the 
allowance as he died in February, 1867. 

These were three very prosperous years, during which 
1865-6-7 plenty of work was done, and the average attendance 

of members reached its maximum. From the point of 
view of a historian they are, however, uninteresting, as little out 
of the ordinary routine of Lodge life took place. A study of the 
list of new members supplies practically the whole Lodge history. 
I may, however, note that Bro. Randal, P.M. was presented with 
a jewel for his valuable services, and that Bro. Guise, P.M. 
failing to get a reversal of the decision of the Lodge, given in 
1864, on the subject of a reduced subscription for old members, 
even though he offered many different modifications of the 
original proposition, resigned. 

In March the sum of £2 2s. Od. was subscribed to the 

1868. Palestine Exploration Fund ; and in December £10 

was voted to the Zetland Memorial, The Earl of 



THE FUOVINCE OF SHROPSHIRE. 189 

Zetland was D.G.M. in 1839, Pro. G.M. in 1840 
under the Duke of Sussex, and G.M. from 1843 to 1871. 1868. 
On his voluntary retirement in the latter year an 
address was presented to him. " The address was supplemented 
by a testimonial consisting of the sum of £2730, together with a 
silver inkstand ; the latter passing into the possession of the 
Earl, and the former constituting the ' Zetland Fund ' for the 
relief of distinguished brethren who might become distressed — of 
which the disposal was to rest with Lord Zetland, and after him 
the Grand Master for the time being, "(i' 

In this and for several years afterwards a curious mistake 
was made by the respective secretaries in noting the installation 
of the W.M. for the time being. This mistake is contained in 
the following sentence, which occurs in the minutes for each 
successive year. — " The Lodge was then opened in the third and 
past masters' degree.'' At the Union in 1813 it was "declared 
and pronounced, that pure Ancient Masonry consists of three 
degrees and no more ; viz. — those of the Entered Apprentice, 
the Fellow Craft, and the Master Mason, including the Supreme 
Order of the Holy Royal Arch." Installation is therefore a 
ceremony only and not a degree. 

A most unpleasant incident occurred in this 
year in the black balling of the son of an eminent 1869. 
member of the Lodge when proposed for membership, a 
dispensation having been obtained for his initiation, though 
under age. The resignation of the father was, of course, 
immediately given, but some explanation evidently took place, as 
the minute referring to his resignation was not confirmed, and he 
remained a member of the Lodge for some time afterwards. 

For the first time in the history of the Lodge its 
W.M. (Bro. G. W. Fisher) attended the Festival of the 1870. 
Royal Masonic Institution for Boys, and took with him 
a subscription of ten guineas. 

(1) Gould vol. iii., p. 25. 



190 FREEMASONRY IN 



On October 10th the Lodge once more began to meet 

1870. regularly at the Lion Hotel, being obliged to leave the 
Raven Hotel through the " refusal of the proprietors 

to comply with its not unreasonable requirements." 

The sum of £/i was voted to the Widow of Bro. Boulter 
Brearey, who had been initiated in the Lodge in the year 1820. 

An elaborate report was in January presented by a 

1871. Committee appointed to deal with the question of 
arrears, no less a sum than £119 being then unpaid. 

As a consequence of this report the names of several brethren 
were erased, only about £16 being ultimately recovered. 

Bro. Mallard died in this year ; he had been Tyler since 
the year 1824, with one short interval caused by the bringing of 
the unfounded charge of stealing wine against him. 

The W.M. (Bro. Cecil Peele) presented the Lodge with 
the handsome Ballot Box now in use. 

The present system of considering the " Whip " paid after 
the banquets as belonging exclusively to the Wine Fund, and 
not to the General Fund of the Lodge, was at this time adopted. 

1872. The by-laws were now once more raised. 

In Nov. the present R.W.P.G.M., Sir Offley Wakeman, 
Bart, was elected a joining member of the Lodge. He has held 
in succession every office in the Lodge from I.G. to W.M , and in 
each and all of these proved himself an excellent working mason. 
The Lodge is proud to still number him amongst its subscribing 
members. 

Bro. R. M. Hickman died in this year, and a warm letter 
of sympathy and regret was written to his family. 

In April Bro. Alfred Salwey of Ludlow, late Chairman 

1873. of the Quarter Sessions for the County of Salop, and 
now Chairman of the County Council, was elected a 

Joining member. 



THE PROVINCE OP SHROPSIIIEE. 191 

At the same meeting the account presented by 
the Clerk of the Peace for the County for recording the 1873, 
list of members of the Lodge was ordered to be paid. 
This is the only reference in the Lodge books to the legal necessity, 
still insisted on, of registering the names of all members of Lodges 
in accordance with the provisions of the Secret Societies Act, 
1799. Such registration was one of the conditions attached by 
the Legislature to the exemption of Masonic Bodies from the 
provisions of that Act. 

With the view of dispensing casual relief upon an uniform 
system, arrangements were now made with 117 that the Almoner 
of that Lodge should also discharge the duties of that office for 
262, the two Lodges to share the expense equally between them. 
This arrangement still continues, and is certainly a most useful 
one, as it prevents the indiscriminate distribution of Charity. 

A donation of £10 10s. Od. to the Royal 
Masonic Institution for Girls was voted in April, and 1874. 
the sum of £5 to the sister of a deceased member 
of 117 in October. 

Bro. E. Cresswell Peele, W.M. presented the 
Lodge with a Past Master's jewel, and received the 1875. 
thanks of the Lodge therefor. 

A donation of £10 10s. Od. was voted to the Royal 
Masonic Institution for Boys in February. 

New collars were provided for the use of the Officers. 

In this year H.R.H. The Prince of Wales was installed 
as Grand Master. The Lodge on this occasion was represented 
by Bros. E. C. Peele, W.M., J. H. Redman, S.W„ E. M. 
Wakeman, J.W., J. B. Cooper, J.D., Sir Offley Wakeman, 
W. Blakeway, P.M., E. Andrew, P.M., and J. P. White, P.M. 

The Lodge now began a regular Subscription 
to the North Wales and Shropshire Charitable 1876. 
Association. 



192 FREEMASONRY IN 



On May 5th a Lodge of Emergency was held ; it was 

1876. attended by both Lodges in Shrewsbury, and addresses, 
congratulating him on his recovery from his prolonged 

illness, were presented to the R.W.P.G.M. Sir Watkin "Wynn. 
One passage from that presented by 262 may be quoted : — "We 
beg respectfully to offer you a most cordial welcome to the Province 
on this our first Masonic gathering since your return, and unite 
in an earnest hope that you may long be enable to fulfil those 
high duties in the Craft which you have for so lengthened a 
period discharged in the Province. Under your rule and 
guidance the Craft has greatly prospered and extended in this 
and neighbouring Counties, and we sincerely trust that for 
many long years to come we may have the honour and pleasure 
of working under a Provincial Grand Master so kind as you 
have ever evinced yourself." This was more than language of 
mere empty compKment, for it expressed the real feelings of 
every thinking Mason in the Province. 

1877. The W.M. Bro. E. M. Wakeman, presented the Lodge 
with the dagger now used by the I.G. 

Bro. John Nigel Heathcote, P.P.G.J.W., died after a 
long and useful Masonic life. He was W.M. of 117 in the 
year 1851, of 262 in the following year, in which year also he 
was appointed the first P.G.J.W. of the then new Province of 
North Wales and Shropshire. Few of our deceased brethren 
were more industrious or better Masons. 

The Lodge voted the sum of 20 guineas, to which another 
5 guineas was added in following year, towards the Sir Watkin's 
Presentation Pund, collected to celebrate the completion by the 
R.W.P.G.M. of 25 years of Office in his exalted post. 

This is the last year in which the rejection of a proposed 
Candidate for initiation took place. 



THE PROVINCE OP SHKOPSHIRE. 193 

Nothing of any interest is recorded in this year 
in reference to the Lodge. It was, however, an eventful 1878. 
year in the history of the Craft, as in it the difference 
between the Grand Lodge of England and the Grand Orient 
of France led to the final rupture between the two bodies. 
The Grand Orient substituted absolute liberty of conscience, 
instead of a belief in the existence of God, as its one fundamental 
religious principle, and the Grand Lodge of England was 
therefore forced to direct all its subordinate Lodges not to 
admit to their meetings any brother, unless (1) he had been 
duly initiated in a Lodge professing belief in the existence of 
the G.A.O.T.U., and (2) himself professed that belief. Every 
Lodge was ordered to insert such direction on its minutes, and 
to see that it was carefully observed. 

The transfer of £20 from the Lodge Fund to the 
Wine Fund in this year shows that in 1879, as well 1879. 
as in 1889, the Wine Whip was sometimes insufficient 
to cover the expense of the quantity of wine consumed. In the 
latter year, however, the difficulty was met in a different way. 

The death of Bro. Samuel Wood severed another link 
that bound the Lodge to the remote past. Bro. Wood, well- 
known in Shrewsbury as an eminent Surgeon, was initiated in 
1838, filled the chair in 1843 and the following year, and took 
an active part in the foundation of the Salopian Chapter, 262. 
He was P.G.A.D. of C. in 1852-3, and P.G.J. W. in 1856-7. 

Sir Offley Wakeman, Bart., the W.M., presented 1880. 
the Lodge with some new collars. 

Once more the appointment of a Committee to deal with 
the large number of Subscribers in arrear may be noted ; but, 
like most of its predecessors for the same purpose, its efforts 
were productive of little good. 

At this time the Deacons took an inventory of the 

Y 



194 FREEMASONRY IN 



Lodge furniture and effects, which has, however, not 

1880. been preserved. Under the present by-laws that duty 
now appertains to the office of the Junior "Warden. 

Towards the end of the year the Lodge supported the 
petition for the foundation of the Lodge at Newport, which was 
consecrated in the following year, and named " The Audley 
Lodge." It was the last Lodge in Shropshire founded in the 
old joint Province. 

For almost the last time we now read of the appoint- 

1881. ment of a Committee to make inquiries about the 
practicability of getting a Masonic Hall in Shrewsbury, 

to be used chiefly for the purpose of the Craft. No report of 
their labours in such a good cause is recorded, but the result 
is evident, inasmuch as the Hall still remains unbuilt. Of the 
utility of such a building there can be no doubt, and the 
Brother, if any, who will in the future be mainly instrumental 
in procuring its establishment, will lay the Masons of Shrewsbury 
under an obligation, which no gratitude they can give him will 
ever discharge. 

An inventory of the old Lodge books was taken in this 
year, but it, like all similar documents of prior date, has 
disappeared. 

A subscription of ten guineas was voted to the 

1882. Institution for girls, and was placed on the list of the 
R.W.P.G.M. who attended the festival as a steward. 

1883. Bro. J. P. White for the second time filled the chair 
in this year. 

The great growth of the Craft in the Joint Province 
now led to a general desire that it should be divided, 
as it was found inconvenient to work so large a district 



THE PUOVINCE OF SHUOPSHIKE. 195 

from one centre. However, tha Salopian Lodge in 
answer to a letter from the Segontium Lodge, Carnar- 1883. 
von, 606, replied — "That whilst the Lodge cordially 
agrees with the desirability of separating the Province of North 
Wales and Shropshire, they consider the present time in. 
opportune, and would defer any discussion thereon, until our 
respected P.G.M., Sir Watkin Wynn, Bart., P.G.M., is in a 
better state of health." 

The sum of ten guineas was voted to each of the three 
Masonic charities for the purchase of permanent votes; the 
harmonium now in use was also purchased at an expense 
of £19. 

The Lodge now began its subscription of 2 guineas 
to the Eye and Ear Hospital in Shrewsbury, and another 1884. 
ten guineas was invested in the purchase of votes for 
the Masonic Institution for Boys. To this Institution the 
boy, France, an account of whose satisfactory progress was read 
out at the P.G. Lodge held at Ludlow in September, 1891, was 
shortly afterwards elected. He was a candidate earnestly 
supported by the Salopian Lodge. 

The W.M., Bro. R. A. Craig, P.P.G.R., and the 
Stewards were appointed to act with a Committee 1885. 
appointed by the Salopian Lodge of Charity 117, to 
make arrangements for a joint Summer pic-nic. So far as 262 
was concerned this pic-nic did not come off ; the Lodge never 
appears to have cared for un-masonic festivities. 

On the deeply regretted death of the R W.P.G.M., a 
letter of condolence was sent to Lady Wynn and was warmly 
acknowledged by her. 

Bro. Thos. Sullock Stooke was W.M, but his jggg 
year of office was a quiet and uneventful onei 



196 FREEMASONRY IN 



The sum of 25 guineas was voted to the Masonic 
1887. Institution, for Girls. In this year the chair at the 
Festival of the Institution was taken by the 
R W.P.G.M. Sir Offley Wakeman, Bart, P.M. 

Bros. Andrew and Chandler both old and valued 
members of the Lodge died on the evening of a Lodge meeting. 
The former was W.M. in the year 1874 and 1882, and was 
P.G.D. in the years 1878-9. The latter was W.M. in 1861, 
and acted as P.G.R. in the two following years. It will be 
remembered that the same coincidence was noted with respect 
to the death of Bro. Churchill in the year 1855. 

The Lion Hotel being now closed the Lodge changed its 
quarters to the Music Hall, but remained there only for a few 
months and then again removed to the old Museum Rooms. 

In this year the Lodge celebrated its Centenary. A 
18S8. Committee was appointed to consider the best method 

of celebrating that most interesting event, and decided 
that, in addition to obtaining permission to wear the "Regulation 
Centenary Medal," an Initiation Ceremony should be worked, and 
a sketch of the Lodge History be read prior to the banquet. 
To this banquet it was also decided to invite all living members 
of the Lodge whether subscribers or not. The Warrant is dated 
the 13th of May, 1788, and on the day following, 100 years 
afterwards, the Centenary was celebrated. The programme 
settled by the Committee was gone through, and Bro. Tredinnick 
had the honour of being initiated on such a special occasion, in 
the presence of nearly 60 brethren. The sketch of the Lodge 
History was prepared and read by Bro. R. A. Craig, P.M., 
P. P.G.R , and was most highly appreciated by the large and 
interested audience It dealt chiefly with the social side of 
the past life of the Lodge, and with those amusing entries 
recorded by the successive Secretaries from time to time, ere 
the close supervision of Provincial Grand Lodge had cramped 
the development of individual eccentricities in this respect. 



THE PROVINCE OF SHROPSHIRE. 197 

A copy of the Centenary Warrant will be found 
amongst the Appendices. It is chiefly remarkable 1888. 
from the fact that, doubtless through a desire for 
brevity, no mention of the number 434 by which the Lodge 
was called from 1792 to 1813 is inserted, and the terms of 
the recital referring to the general renumberings in 1832 
and 1863, do not disclose that the Lodge was once 
numbered 328. The correspondence with the Grand Lodge 
prior to the grant of this Warrant was carried out entirely by 
Bro. W. E. Harding, P.M., P.P G.W. The only difficulty the 
Lodge had to experience was in connection with the years 1831 
to 1836. The semi-dormant condition of the Lodge at this 
time has been already dealt with on a previous page. It will, 
I think, be sufficient here to remark that from the books of 
Grand Lodge sufficient evidence was produced to ensure the 
grant of the Warrant so eagerly sought for. Such evidence 
mainly consisted of entries of payments made by the Lodge 
for the period in question. On the books of the Lodge being 
placed in the hands of the Grand Secretary for inspection, that 
official discovered that the names of many members on the 
Lodge Roll had never been registered in Grand Lodge, this 
being especially the case between the years 1800 and 1816. 
He then suggested that the Lodge would probably like to make 
the Register complete, but as the Secretary records : — " The 
Brethren did now show that anxiety to have the Registry 
complete, as it would mean a considerable payment to Grand 
Lodge." 

The Lodge was fortunate enough to receive a Centenary 
birthday present from the R.W.P.G.M. in the shape of two 
decanters, facsimilies of some old ones carefully preserved and 
valued by the Lodge. 

The W.M., Bro. P. M. Berkeley, PD.G., 
presented the Lodge with an exceedingly handsome 1889. 
banner desiged by himself, such presentation being 



198 FREEMASONRY IN 



intended as a memorial of his year of office. No 

1889. gift could have been more acceptable to the Lodge, 
as it had never previously possessed such a necessary 

ornament. 

The wine Fund being in an unsatisfactory state, various 
proposals were considered for placing it on a better footing. 
These proposals indicated considerable ingenuity on the part 
of the brethren proposing them, but ultimately the simple plan 
of increasing the wine whip was adopted, and has, I believe, 
produced satisfactory results from the Treasurer's point of view. 

The death of Bro. J. P. White in this year, though it 

1890. was not unexpected, was a great blow to the Lodge. 
On his death the last link that bound us to what may 

be called our past history was severed ; the Lodge lost a true 
hearted member and faithful Mason who had served it well ; 
and all of us lost a brother who carried out in every action of 
his life the dictates of true Masonic spirit. He was initiated 
as we have already seen, in 1840, and was Master in 1846 and 
again in 1883. He was also a member of 117, of which Lodge 
he filled the chair in the years 1855 and 1857, after having 
taken a very prominent part in re-establishing it after the 
amalgamation in 1851-2. 

He was appointed P.G. Treasurer of the Province of 
North Wales and Shropshire in 1852, and continued in that 
office till the separation of the joint Province in 1885, he also 
occupied the chair of the Senior Warden of the Province in the 
year 1883. He was always especially proud of the gold snuff box 
presented to him by the Provincial Grand Lodge as already 
mentioned, and it has many times circulated round the dinner 
table of 262. He frequently expressed his intention of bequeathing 
it to the Lodge on his death, but his final Will contained no 
reference to the subject, and his representatives refused to 
recognize an existing, but informal, expression of his wishes as 
binding upon them. The snuff.box was accordingly sold by public 



THE PROVINCE OP SHROPSHIRE. 199 

auction, and fetched the sum of £37, one quite beyond 
the reach of the Lodge finances. In the closing year 1890. 
of his life Bro. White was unable through illness to 
accept an invitation from the two Shrewsbury Lodges to be 
present at some celebration of the jubilee of his connection with 
the Craft, and the celebration was according allowed to fall 
through. Shortly afterwards he passed away to the Celestial 
Grand Lodge, his funeral being attended by a large gathering 
of Shropshire Masons. 

The only other event in this year which I need record is 
the gift by Bro. W. E. Harding, P.M., P.P.G.W. of a charity 
box in the shape of a column standing on a pedestal. The 
efforts of Bro. Harding in the cause of all the Masonic Charities 
are unwearying, and he proves a most efficient and energetic 
Charity Representative to the Lodge. The box is used for 
collecting the donations of the brethren after the banquet, and 
the sale of its contents by the "W.M., who acts in a truly 
professional manner, is productive of much amusement and 
keen competition, if not of profit to the pocket of the brother 
who purchases them. 

Early in this year the sum of £13 was voted to 
pay for the panel placed by the Lodge in the window of 1891. 
the Royal Masonic Institution for girls. This window 
was erected to celebrate the Centenary of the Institution which, 
like the Salopian Lodge, was founded in 1788. 

The by-laws were again revised, and, for the first time for 
many years, issued in a book form to the members. This book 
also contains lists of the Officers, Past Masters, and Subscribing 
Brethren of the Lodge. 



Such, as best I can tell it, is the history of my mother 
Lodge, 262. The history is, I think, full of interest, and 
contains evidence of a century of quiet unobtrusive work. If 



200 FREEMASONRY IN 



my efforts have failed to do justice to my subjeat, that failure 
is, the result of inability not of want of love for the task. 
If, on the other hand, I have succeeded in any degree in 
interesting my brethren, and arousing in them a feeling of 
deeper affection for our Lodge, I shall feel that I am amply 
rewarded. 




THE PROVINCE OP SHROPSHIRE. 201 



List op Masters. 



1788— William Neale. 
1789— 

1 7<)0 / ^illi^Di Neale. 
I Thomas Loxdale. 

1791 — Thomas Loxdale. 

1792— Samuel Jones (S.W. as W.M.) 

1793 — Samuel Jones. 

1794— Thomas Bassett. 

1795— William Taylor. 

1796— Richard Phillips. 

1797 — John Carline. 

1798— Richard Phillips. 

179 9— Thomas Bassett. 

1800— William Taylor. 

, D^l f Thomas Bassett. 

) William Clement (elected, but never acted.) 

1802— Richard Phillips. 
1803— William Taylor. 
1804— John Carline. 
1805 — Thomas Bassett. 
1806— William Taylor. 
1807— William Hitchcock. 
1808— Henry Linell. 
1809 — Thomas Bassett. 
1810— Richard Phillips. 
1811 —William Taylor. 
1812— John Carline. 
1813— 
1814— 

-.r^-iR Richard Phillips. 
'^^^^ John Carline. 



202 FREKMASOXRY IN 



-John Carline. 
—William Taylor. 
-"William Bowley. 
—Thomas Bassett. 
—"William Cooper. 
-"William Barnes. 
-George Morris. 

~~ )) 

-Thomas Groves. 

-Sir Andrew Vincent Corbet, Bart., P.P.G.S."W. 

—John Carline, Junr. 

-Samuel Johnson. 

-James Lawrence. 

-John Whitney. 

-James Moore. 

-William James Clement, P.P.G.S.W. 

I No records. The Lodge 

probably did not meet, and 
the officers elected in 1831 

' remained in office till 1836. 

-William James Clement, P.P.G.S.W. 
-William Cooper. 
-Thomas Groves. 
-Charles Bowen Teece. 
-Thomas Carline. 
-William Henry Cooper. 
-Henry Bloxam, P.P.G.R. 
-Samuel Wood, P.P.G.J.W. 

-William Wood. 

-Joshua Pugh White, P.P.G.S.W. 

-Henry T. Wace, P.P.G.S. of W. 

~ J) 

-William Brightwell, P.P.G.S.W. 

-William Burr, P.P.G.J.W. 

-Rev. Edward H. Dymock, P.D.P.G.M. 



THE PROVINCE OP SIIROPSHIllE. 203 

1852— John Nigel Heatlicote, P.P.G.J.W. 

1853— John Broughall, P.P.GR. 

1854— George Gordon, P.P.G. Std. B. 

1855— Benjamin Churchill, P.P.G.D. of C. 

1856— Rev. George C. Guise, P.P.G.C. 

1857— William Harley Bayley, P.P.G.J.W. 

1858— John Lawrence Randal, P.P.G.S.W. 

1859— Rev. John Hinton Bluck, P.P.G.C. 

I860— Rev. WlUiam Elliot, P.P.G.D. of 0. 

1861— Charles Chandler, P.P.G.R. 

1862— Robert Niccolls, P.P.G.P. 

1863— Rev. W. B. H, Bulkeley-Owen, P.P.G.J.W. 

1864— Charles George Wingfield, P.P.G.S.W. 

1865— Charles Oakley, P.P.G. Swd. B. 

1866— Edward Tipton, P.P.G.R. 

1867— Thomas K. Gardner. 

1868— R. Jasper More, P.P.G. Steward. 

1869— WilUam Eddowes. 

1870— Rev. George W. Fisher, P.P.G.C. 

1871— Cecil Peele. 

1872— William Blakeway, P.P.G.J.W. 

1873— John Davies Harries, P.P.G. Std. B. 

1874— Edwyn Andrew, P.P.G.S.W. 

1875— Edmund Cresswell Peele, P.P.G.J.W. 

1876— Joseph H. Redman, P.P.G.J.W. 

1877— Edward M. Wakeman, P.P.G.S.W. 

1878— Henry Newman, P.P.G. Steward. 

1879— Henry Charles Clarke, P.P.G.R. 

1880— Sir Oifley Wakeman, Bart., R.W.P.G.M. 

1881— W. E. Stuart, P.P.G.S.D. 

1882— Edwyn Andrew, P.P.G.J.W. 

1883— Joshua Pugh White, P.P.G.S.W. 

1884— William Edward Harding, P.P.G.J.W. 

1885— Robert A. Craig, P.P.G.R. 

1886— Thomas S. Stooke. 



201 FREEMASONRY IN 



1887— Arthur Lowcock, P.P.G.S. of W. 
1888— John Avery, P.P.G.J.W. 
1889— Paul Maurice Berkeley, P.G.S.D. 
1890— Arthur E. Lloyd Oswell, P.G.S. of W. 
1891— Wyndham Deedes, P.G. Steward. 
1892— James Edward Smith. 




THE PllOVINCE OF SHROPSHIUE. 205 



THE SALOPIAN CHAPTER, 262. 



The Charter for this Chapter, working in connection with 
the Salopian Lodge, was granted on May 17th, 1843. The 
history of the Royal Arch in Shrewsbury is set out very clearly 
in the Petitions forwarded to Grand Chapter before the Charter 
was granted. These Petitions are inserted in the minutes of the 
Lodge for May 8th, and are as follows : — 

" The Petition of the members of the Salopian Lodge No. 328. 

To the Supreme Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons of 

England 

Sheweth 

That your petitioners have 
existed as a Lodge of Craft Masons since July 1788. That in 
1797 the brethren determined to hold a Royal Arch Chapter 
which for a few years regularly met. Circumstances with which 
we need not trouble the Grand Chapter caused its discontinuance. 
In the year 1820 the companions of the Chapter, including 
several who had been companions at its commencement, resumed 
it, and continued to meet until 1830, without being aware that 
they were in the slightest degree infringing any of the statutes 
of the Order. The impression on the minds of the so constituted 
companions being that they had a right to exalt any members of 
the Salopian Lodge. Upon hearing to the contrary their 
meetings ceased. We name this to show that any infringement 
of the constitutions was inadvertent on their parts. Our humble 
prayer therefore is that the Supreme Grand Chapter will allow 
all the companions exalted in such Chapter attached to the 
Salopian Lodge, who are now alive, to be duly registered on their 
paying the usual fees to the Supreme Chapter. In consequence 
of there being no regularly registered Royal Arch Mason in 
Shrewsbury, with the exception of two of the members of this 



206 FEEEMASONHY IN 



Lodge who were exalted in London for the purpose of obtaining 
a Chapter, and also from the circumstance of the Agenorian 
Chapter No. 398 Bridgnorth having, as we are informed, ceased 
to exist, your petitioners have been induced to adopt the only 
course which appears open to them, and which we humbly hope 
will be sanctioned by the Supreme Grand Chapter. We your 
petitioners firmly believe that Shrewsbury being the county 
town, and from other and various causes, that, should the 
Supreme Grand Chapter grant our prayer, it will tend greatly to 
the advancement of the Craft in the County of Salop." 

" To the Supreme Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons 
of England — 

"We the undersigned being Royal Arch Masons are 
desirous of establishing a regular Chapter to be holden in 
conformity with the laws and regulations of the Supreme Grand 
Chapter of the Order, and, for the convenience of our dwelling, 
do pray for a Charter enabling us to meet at the Masonic 
Rooms in the Town of Shrewsbury on the 3rd Wednesday in the 
months of Octr., Janr., April, & July, to be attached to the 
Salopian Lodge No. 328, and we also nominate and recommend 
Thos. Groves to be the first Principal Z., Comp. Wm. Cooper to 
be the first Principal H., & Comp John Carline to be the first 
Principal J. 

The prayer of this petition being granted, we promise 
strict obedience to the laws of the Grand Chapter and a strict 
observance of the ancient Rites and Ceremonies of the Order. 

Signed 

W. H. White, G.S.E., London. 
Wm. Cooper, Shrewsbury. 
Thomas Groves 
John Carline 
Chas. B. Teece 
Wm. Wood 
Thos. Carline 
James Whitney 



THE PROVINCE OF SHROPSHIRE. 207 

The date of the introduction of the Royal Arch into 
England cannot be definitely stated, approximately it is placed 
by Bro. Hughan about the period 1737-1740. The "Ancients" 
were acustomed to- work the Ceremony in their ordinary Craft 
Lodges, whereas the "Moderns" early separated it from Craft 
Masony, and worked in it Chapters holding Charters for that 
purpose from a Grand Chapter. 

The Salopian Lodge cannot, I think, in 1797, have 
adopted the practice of the "Ancients," for not a trace of it 
appears in the records, nor, on the other hand, did it follow 
the custom of the "Moderns" by working the degree, (as it 
was then called), by virtue of a legal constitution from Grand 
Chapter; a middle course seems to have been adopted, namely 
that of working the Ceremony apart from the Craft Lodge under 
the mistaken notion that the Craft Warrant legalized such 
working. The fact that only one brother is recorded to have 
passed the chair, and this so early as 1790, seems to show that 
only the past masters of the Lodge could have been present at 
such private working. It may, perhaps, be only a coincidence 
that the only visitor described as being a Royal Arch Mason 
(G. Bott. 37 St. Pauls, R.A.M.) visited the Lodge twice in 
November, 1796, whether or not his presence had anything to 
do with the introduction of the Royal Arch into Shrewsbury 
in the following year, I cannot say. As at this date Grand 
Chapter was not formally recognized by Grand Lodge, the 
Salopian Lodge by its working the Royal Arch above mentioned, 
did not violate the Laws of the Grand Lodge in any way, but, 
in the year 1820, when, according to the first Petition above 
quoted, work was resumed, the Grand Chapter had been 
formally recognized by the Grand Lodge, and working the 
Ceremony without a Charter was clearly irregular. The 
minute books contains no reference to the subject, but on the 
back cover of an old Steward's book the following is scribbled 
in pencil : — " Parcel to London Royal Arch book, 2/6. Same 
returned June 4th, 1823, 2/6." I can make no guess what 



208 FREEMASONRY IN 



this book contained, or to whom it was sent, but the entry 
supports the statement, made in the Petition, that between 
the years 1820 and 1830, the Royal Arch was worked in 
Shrewsbury, 

From the minute book of 117 it may be seen, as already 
noticed, that two members of that Lodge went to Bridgnorth 
to be exalted in the year 1834.(i) These brethren were not 
however, subscribing members of their Mother Lodge, and as 
the Agenorian Chapter had in the latter year ceased working, 
there can be little doubt that the statement contained in the 
Petition that there was then no regular registered Royal Arch 
Mason in Shrewsbury, was correct. 

The founders according to the Charter, were Thomas 
Groves, Z ; William Cooper, H ; John Carline, J ; William 
Clement, W. H. White, G. Scribe, E ; C. B. Teece, William 
Wood, Thomas Carline, and James Whitney. The first 
minute book is not now in the possession of the Chapter, and 
little is known of its working until the year, 1862. From an 
old letter(2) dated 17th August, 1843, addressed to Comp. 
J. P. White by Comp. W. H. White, I gather, however, that 
the first meeting was held on August 12th, 1843, and that 
Comp. W. H. White acted as Z on that occasion. Two 
brethren were then exalted. The progress of the Chapter has 
been sure and steady, but quiet work, rather than a participation 
in notable events, has been its chief characteristic. In 1875 
its possessed over 30 members, since which date little variation 
in its numbers has taken place. 

List of P.Z's. 

1862— W. Brightwell. 
1863-4-T Onions. 
1865— S. Wood. 



(1) See ante p. 77 The date, 1843, after the name of Bros. Powis and Dodd is 

a mis-print for 1834. 

(2) This letter, with other Masonic remains of Bro. Onions, P.M., 117, has been 

kindly placed in my bands by Bro. E, Urry, of Shrewsbury. 



THE PROVINCE OP SHROPSHIRE. 209 

1866-7-T. Phillips. 

1868— C. G. Wingfield. 

1873— J. P. White. 

1873— T. Onions. 

1873_\V. Brightwell. 

1874 — J. Loxdale Warren. 

1875— C. Chandler 

1876— G. Gordon Warren. 

1877 — E. Andrew. 

1878— E. 0. Peele. 

1879— J. B. Boucher. 

1880— E. M. Wakeman. 

1881— J. H. Redman. 

1882— E. M. Wakeman. 

1883— Sir Offley Wakeman, Bart. 

1884— T. W. Thompson. 

1885— V. 0. L. Crump. 

1886— J. Blockley. 

1887— W. E. Harding. 

1888— R. G. Venables. 

1889— W. Belton. 

1890— T. Whitefoot, Junior. 

1891^J. H. Parsons. 




AA 



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214 FREEMASONRY IN 



[Appendix C] 

BYE LAWS FOR THE GOOD RULE AND 

GOVERISrMElsrT OF THE SALOPIAN LODGE OF FREE 

AND ACCEPTED MASONS, No. 525, 

Adopted August 20th, 1788. 



1st 

Tliis Lodge shall be held at Fox Inn in Shrewsbury from whence it 
cannot be removed by any one or more of the Member's of their own accord, 
but any one or more may mention to the Master the rea.son of their dislike 
to meet there any more of which ho is to acquaint the Lodge when a 
majority of the members present at that time on the List may determine 
whether it is to continue there or to be removed. 

2nd 

The Lodge is to meet on the first Tuseday in every Month in the 
year in the Months of March, April, May, June, July, August and September 
at Eight o'clock and close at Ten and in all the other Months at Six and 
close at Nine and no Brother shall remain in the Lodge-Room on a 
Lodge-Night after Eleven o'Clock under the penalty of Two Shillings and 
Sixpence for each offence. 

3rd 

This Lodge is to have according to ancient custom a Master and officers 
(viz) two Wardens, two Deacons, a Steward a Secretary, a Treasurer, a 
grand and deputy Tyler, also subscribing and honorary Members, the Officers 
shall be chosen annually on the lodge night preceding Saint John the 
Evangelist, the Master to be elected out of such of the subscribing Master 
Masons who shall have served the Office of Wardens, the lodge to elect the 
two Wardens and Treasurer and the Master to appoint the other Officers, 
the Master and Officers to be installed and enter upon their respective 
Offices on the day of Saint John the Evangelist. 

4th 

The Master shall £;overn and regulate the lodge in a Mason like 
manner agreeable to the Book of Constitutions set forth and authorized 
by the Grand Lodge of England from time to time and it ' is strictly 
recommended to all the Members of this lodge to pay the greatest attention 
to the Worshipful Master and duly to observe the Senior and Junior 
Wardens, therefore at the Master's request every one must submit to 
order, and no more than one must speak at a time, that thej' address 
the master and not continue more than five minutes speaking with out his 
permission, in case two or more shall rise to' speak the Master shall appoint 
who is to speak first, and all the others shall submit to order under the 
penalty of two Shillings and Sixpence. 



THE PROVINCE OP SHROPSHIRE 215 



5th 

The Master when the business and welfare of the lodge I'equires it 
shall appoint out of the subscribing Members a Committee to enquire into 
sueli business which shall at some short convenient time make snch enquires 
and collect such information as may be ottered and applicable thereto, 
and report the same at the grand lodge Night next afterwards for their 
consideration, the expencea of which Committee shall be paid out of the 
fund of the Lodge. 

6th 

The Master on request shall call Lodges of Emergency And shall 
cause the business to be inserted in the Summonses the expence of which 
shall be borne by the person requesting such lodge to be callol, unless when 
the Master shall call it on some particular business of the Lodge and then 
it shall be defrayed out of the fund of the Lodge. 

7th 

The Master shall not neglect to set his men to work and to instruct 
them by Seasonable Lectures in the grand principles of Masonry under such 
penalties as the Wardens and Brethren shall think proper. 

8th 

The Wardens and ofiGcers of the Lodge shall duly attend each lodge 
Night under such penalty as the Master and Brethren shall think proper 
for each neglect. 

9th 

In case of the absence of any of the officers the Master shall appoint 
out of the subscribing Master Masons another or others in the room of 
Absentee or Absentees for that Night only. 

10th 

In the absence of the Master the Senior Warden shall officiate as 
Master, in his absence the Junior Warden and in the absence of the Junior 
Warden the past Master or oldest Master Mason shall officiate as Master. 

nth 

Upon the election of officers and in all other cases when the Master 
shall direct a poll to be taken and the Votes shall be equal, the Master shall 
have a casting Vote. 

12th 

The Master shall fine any brother who shall enter the Lodge disguised 
In liquor in the sum of one Shilling and order him to depart the Lodge for 
that Night and he shall severely reprimand any Brother who shall curse, 
swear or make nse of any prophane, obscene, or indecent language in the 
lodwe and fine him in the sum of one Shilling for the first oifence and for the 
second he shall expel him the Lodge. 



216 FREEMASONRY IN 



13th 

The Master upon such Bfotlier making due submission and paying 
,five shillings to the fund of the Lodge shall cause a Ballot to be taken by 
the Senior Deacon aud if it appear that two thirds of the Members then 
present shall be for his readmission he shall be readmitted but if otherwise 

he shall not and shall have the live shillings returned. 

i 

14th 

The Secretary shall enter the proceedings of each Night in the Lodge 
Book shall mention in what degree of Masonry the Lodge was opened, and 
shall read the proceedings of the general lodge Night next preceding, and 
likewise such proceedings if any, as shall have been entered in the Book 
subsequent thereto. He shall send Summonses to the subcribing Members 
oue day at least before any general lodge Night. He shall obey the master 
in sending summonses for a lodge of emergency and specify tlierein the 
particular business of such Lodge. 

15th 

The Treasurer shall receive and pay all sums of money that shall be 
received and paid by or on account of the Lodge and enter the sanje in a 
Book or Books to be kept for that purpose, which shall be open on general 
Lodge Nights for the inspection of the Members of the Lodge. He shall pay 
no Bills on account of the Lodge but such as shall have beeu signed by the 
Master. He shall give np to the Master and Lodge at the end of the year 
for which he hath been chosen Treasurer or on another Treasurer having 
been chosen in his room, a fair, just and true account of monies received 
and paid by him, also Vouchers for such sums of money as he shall have 
paid together with the said Books of Accounts and pay over to the succeeding 
Treasurer such balance as appear to be due to the Lodge on settling such 
accounts, such accounts shall be allowed by the Lodge and signed by the 
Master and Wardens and any other of the members of the Lodge. 

16th 
All Ballots and Polls shall be taken by the Senior Deacon. 

17th 

The grand Tyler shall attend within the Lodge each Lodge nigbt 
likewise at the Festivals and on Lodges of emergency. The deputy Tyler 
shall deliver out all such Summonses as shall be delivered him by the Master 
or Secretary, and attend the Lodge each Lodge night as before. 

18th 

The qualifications of those who are desirous of being made Masons 
or of becoming Members of this Lodge must be such as the ancient 
Constitutions and Laws prescribe. 

19th 

A person desirous of being made a Mason must be proposed to the 
Lodge by a Member on a general Lodge Night. Which proposal must be 
seconded by another Member or not admitted, a Member proposing a person 
to be made a Mason in this Lodge shall at the time he proposes him present a 



THK PROVINCE OP SHUOPSHIEE. 217 



petition from such person, praying to be made a Mason and shall likewise 
pay half-a-Giiinea to the Treasurer which in ease of the non-appearance of 
the person to be made on the Lodge appointed for his being made, shall be 
forfeit unless m, satisfactory cause be made for him in which case another 
Night shall be appointed, of which he shall have six days notice at least 
from the Lodge and if he shall not attend within three Montlis from the 
time first appointed the half Guinea shall be forfeit and applied to the fund 
of ;he Lodge. 

20th 

The petition of such person so proposed to bo made a Mason shall be 
taken into consideration the general Lodge Night next after his having been 
proposed, and the Members then present shall Ballot for him by black and 
white Beans, if on taking such Ballot there shall be one black Bean 
against him he shall not be made, and the half Guinea shall be returned. 

21st 

Any person being made a ilason in this Lodge shall pay Two Pounds 
fifteen Shillings including the half Guinea five Shillings of which shall be 
for registering Two Shillings and Sixpence for the Secretary one Shilling 
and Sixpence for the Deputy Tyler and the residue shall be applied to the 
fund of the Lodge. On a Brother being passed to a fellow Craft he shall 
pay ten shilings and sixpence and on being raised to a Master Mason the 
like sum of Ten Shillings and Sixpence which shall be respectively applied to 
the fund of the Lodge. 

22nd 

If a Brother is desirous of becoming a member of this Lodge he shall in 
like manner be proposed on a General Lodge Night, and if upon taking 
such Ballot it shall appear that two thirds of the Members then piesent be 
for his admission, he shall be admitted otherwise he shall not be admitted 
nor again proposed a Member of this Lodge and for his admission he shall 
pay half-a-Guinea, and which shall be applied to the fund of the Lodge. No 
person who shall have been proposed to be made a Mason in this Lodge and 
rejected, .shall be admitted a Member of this Lodge unless he shall in like 
manner be balloted for, and if upon taking such Ballot there shall be one 
Black Bean against him he shall not be admitted. 

23rd 

If any Brother demands a Certificate of his having been regularly 
admitted a Mason in this Lodge, or of his having taken any degree of 
masonry, the Master shall direct the Secretary to make out the same, it 
shall be sealed with the Seal of the Lodge signed by the Master and Wardens 
and contersigned by the Secretary, and for which such person shall pay five 
Shillings one half of which shall go to the fund of the Lodge and the other 
to the Secretary. 

24th 

Every Member of this Lodge shall pay One Shilling a Month 
which shall be collected by the Treasurer three Months in advance and 
applied to the fund of the Lodge. Every subscribing Member of this Lodge 
shall pay One Shilling and Sixpence per month for the expences of the 
Night which shall likewise be collected by the treasurer three Months in 
advance and no brother shall be peimitted to be an honorary Member if his 
usual place of residence is within five miles of Shrewsbury. 

BB 



218 PREEMASONEY IN 



25th 

A Brotlier visiting this Lodge shall have his name entered in the 
Book containing these Hye-laws also in what degree of Masonry he stands, 
the name of the Lodge to which he belongs and be admitted the first Night 
of visiting free of expence ho shall afterwards pay One Shilling and Sixpence 
for the Nights expences and One Shilling to the fund of the Lodge except 
such brother shall be a subscribing Member to some other Lodge in which 
case he shall pay the Nights expences only. 

26th 

No member shall have a property in the Jewels and Furniture of this 
Lodge until he shall have subscribed and paid to the fund of the Lodge 
three years. 

27ai 

If any member neglect or refuse to attend the Lodge or pay his 
Monthly dues, he shall be written to and admonished for the first three 
Months, and if he pays no regard to that, at the end of six months he shall 
be expelled, as the arrears of the Lodge must all be settled in that time. 

28th 

It shall be at all times lawful for the Officers with the consent oi the 
subscribing Members to repeal, alter, amend or add to these Bye Laws in 
such manner as shall seem most expedient to promote the Interest and 
strengthen the Cement of this Lodge. But such repeal, amendment, or addition 
shall be proposed on one general Lodge Night taken into consideration the 
second and confirmed on the third and all the subscribing members then 
on the List shall bo apprised of the nature of the business in the Summonses 
for each Night. 

29th 

These Bye Laws shall be read by the Secretary on the admission ot 
every new made Mason and Member, to which each Member shall subscribe 
his name under the following obligation :— 

We the subscribing members of this Lodge do most sincerely declare 
that it shall be our study to ob.sorve a strict obedience to these Bye Laws, 
Kules Orders, and Regulations before mentioned and will always confoim 
to such well advised Charges and Constitutions as the free and accepted 
of all Ages have chearfully submitted to from time immemorial. 

In Witness whereof we have hereunto subscribed our Names, d) 

(1) Here following the Signatures of 78 Brethren, the last of whom was initiated 
in 1814. 



THE PKOVINCE OP SHROPSHIRE. 



219 



[Appendix D.] 



LIST OP MEMBERS 



OF THE 



SALOPIAN LODGE, 



262. 



Name. 

Original Members. 

tWilliam Neale 
+Thomas Barkley 
tWilliam Cottom 
tJohn Beck 

+Jolin Brackley 

Pritchard 
t John Hall 
tEdward Innys 
Alexander Keate 



*E. T. Smith 
*Thomas Telford 
+*John Gellion 
*John Greene 

* Thomas Sanders 
*Thomas Gray 
t*J. Watkis 

* Thomas Bassett 
John Hodges 
Thomas Loxdale 
Thomas Lloyd 
James Trehearn 
George Bowdler 
Thomas Jellicoe 

George Holland 
Richard Durnell 
Philip Williams 
William Tunstall 
John Podmore 



Profession 

or 
Occupation. 



Hosier 

)j 
Innkeeper 
Banker and Wine 
Merchant 

Painter 
Draper 

Working Jeweller 
Tea Dealer 



Royal Navy 

Surveyor 

Carrier 

Dyer 

Engraver 

Mercer 

Wire Worker 

Upholsterer 

Attorney 

)) 
Innkeeper 
Merchant Tailor 
Gent. Farmer 

Reverend 

Surgeon 

Steward 

Farmer 

Ensign 47th Reat. 



Residence. 



Shrewsbury 



Shrewsbury 

Chester 

Shrewsbury 



Shrewsbury 



Loton Park, 



Salop 



Condover 
Pitchford 
Stoke Castle 



Year o£ 
admis- 
sion. 



1788 



220 


FEEEMASONEY IN 






Name. 


Profession or 
Occupation. 


Residence. 


Tear of 
admis- 
sion. 


James Matthews 


Reverend 


The Schools, 


1788 


Thomas Lloyd 
Thomas Cooke 


Reverend 

Malster 


Shrewsbury 
Shrewsbury 


J) 


Richard Dansey 
*William Bourlay 
John Warren 


Esquire 

Dancing Master 
Accountant 


Little, Hereford 
Shrewsbury 
J) 


1789 


Richard Oliver 


Grocer 


J) 


J) 


Robert John 








Cartwright 


Gentleman 


Manchester 


)j 


Richard Jenkins 
Samuel Jones 
John Samuel Meire 


Esquii-e 

Oil Case Maker 

Gentleman 


Bicton, Salop 
Shrewsbury 
J, 




Sacheveral Harwood 


Printer 


J, 




Richard GoiF 


Gentleman 






AVilliam Hazledine 


Millwright 


— 




Robert Jones 


Organist 


Shrewsbury 


}} 


Henry Podmore 
William Bowley 
Wythen Evans 
John Lewis 


Captain 
Engraver 
Esquire 
Gentleman 


Calcott 

Shrewsbury 

Machynlleth 


J) 
)J 

J) 


William Evans 


Gentleman 


Bridgnorth 




*tBennett Dorsett 


Reverend 





1790 


William Heighway 
John Salisbury Dod 
Thomas Hodges 


Esquire 
Surgeon 
Farmer 


— 




John Niccolls 


Farmer 


— 


• ) 


Edward Lewis 


Reverend 


— 


J) 


Edward Kyffin 
Thomas Lowe 
Paul Wilkinson 


Waiter 

Land Surveyor 

Tea Dealer 


Shrewsbury 




tThomas Colley 
John Carline 
James James 


Architect 
Gentleman 


Shrewsbury 


J) 


William Simes 
William Taylor 


Attorney 
Malster 


Shrewsbury 


J) 


*Richard Phillips 
John Jones 
Jacob Jones 
*John King 
f Carter 


Attorney 
Esquire 
Innkeeper 
Organist 


Shrewsbury 
Machynlleth 
Aberystwith 
Shrewsbury 


1791 
1792 


t John Heighway 
tJoseph Hodges 
John Jaundrel 
Thomas Whitney 


Wine Merchant 

Schoolmaster 

Waiter 


Eereford 

Pontesbury 

Shrewsbury 





THE 


PROVINCE OF SHKOPSHIRE. 


221 


Name. 


Profession or 
Occupation. 


Residence. 


Year of 
admis- 
sion. 


Myttoii Skrymsher 


Surgeon 


Pontesbury 


1792 


John Lawrence, Jun. 


Esquire 


The Mines, Salop 


)) 


Benjamin Partridge 


Bookbinder 


— 


jj 


^■'t William Hamilton 


— 





1793 


William Clement 


Apothecary 


Shrewsbury 


J) 


f John Jones 


Reverend 


Pontesbury 


)> 


-HCharles Shirreff 


Major 


Whitchurch 


1794 


*+ — • — Driver 


— 







+John Nash 


— 







+John Rawlins 


— 





)) 


Bythell 


— 


— 


1795 


John Sheppai'd 


— 


— 


J) 


James Uley Harris 


— 


— 


)> 


William Chrees 


— 


Wolverhampton 


)J 


Henry Tiinell 


Mason 


Shrewsbury 


1796 


*trrancis Careswell 


— 


)> 


1797 


John Long 


Gentleman 




J) 


Samuel Griffiths 


Shopkeeper 


Made gratis for 
Tyler 


JJ 


James Bryan 


Innkeeper 


— 


)) 


Henry Bowdler 


Gentleman 


— 


1798 


John Jenks 


Currier 


Broseley 


J» 


*t Lewis 


Innkeeper 


Worcester 


1800 


*tJ. Garthside 


Lieutenant 21st 

Dragoons 


— 


)J 


*+J. G. Whitaker 


Serjeant-Major ,, 


— 


)) 


*t William Hackett 


Quarter-Master ,, 


— 


)) 


*+Thomas Wilkinson 


jj J) 


— 


)3 


*+Edward Wall 


Private (?) „ 


— 


77 


tPhilip Jones 


— 


Shrewsbury 


1801 


+John Kent 


— 


— 


3J 


* William Roberts 


Shoemaker 


— 


1802 


*tCamel Hinkley 


(? Campbell) — 


— 


3J 


William Hitchcock 


Land Surveyor 


Shrewsbury 


>> 


William Garden 


Builder 


J) 


») 


*tThomas Whealan 


Reverend 




1803 


George Grant 


Gardener 


Shrewsbury 


J) 


t William Macaulay 


— 


— 


1807 


tThomas Kenyon 


Serjeant 53 Regt. 


. — 


1812 


*tDavid Dear Seygil 


— 


■ — 


)) 


*Peter Horsman 


Clerk 


— 


1813 


*+Richard Davies 


. — . 


— 


J) 


*John Straphen 


Architect 


Shrewsbury 


1814 


*t James Phillips 


— 


■ — 


JJ 


•Sir John Hill 


Baronet 


Hawkstone 


J) 



'Zi-1 


FREEMASONRY IN 




Name. 


Profession or 


Residence. 


Year of 
admis- 




Occupation. 




sion. 


William Barnes 


Whitesmith 


Shrewsbury 


1814 


Charles Bigg 


Seedsman 


J) 


JJ 


William Hams 


Carpenter 


•? 


JJ 


+ William Studley 


— 


— 


JJ 


+Thomas Turner 








Shelton 


— 


— 


JJ 


+George Thornton 


— 


— 


JJ 


John Davies 


— 


— 


JJ 


George Osmond Quick 


Innkeeper 


Shrewsbury 


JJ 


James Anderson 










Samuel Johnson 


— 







Joseph Whitford 


— 





3J 


f Richard Jenkins 


— 







James Sandford 


— 


— 




tWilliam Wilding 


Hatter 


Shrewsbury 


JJ 


James Price 


— . 


. 




Thomas L. Watkinson 


Actor 


— 




*t— Duck 


— 


. — 


18J5 


*t Robert Atkinson 


— 


— 




Richard Loxdale 


Solicitor 


Shrewsbury 




tJames Barnaby 


Mercer 


)) 


JJ 


William Thomas 









tEdward Davies 


— 


Welshpool 


1816 


t William A. Pro vis 


Civil Engineer 


Ellesmere 




+George Sharpies 


— 


— 


JJ 


Richard Broughall 


Grocer 


Shrewsbury 


JJ 


Thomas Groves 


Builder 






Roger Beckett 









Thomas Dawson 


Parmer 






Edward Jones 


Innkeeper 


)j 


J} 


William Millington 


Joiner 






tJohn Stanton 










*Richard Bratton 


Broker 


Shrewsbury 


1817 


William Griffiths 


Surgeon 






William Cooper 


Solicitor 


jj 




George Morris 


Bookseller 


" 




Simon Barber 


Mercer 






*James Ryan 


Director of Mines 





1818 


John Denstone 








Shepherd 


Mercer 


Shrewsbury 


1819 


George Hanley 


Seedsman 


)) 


}) 


John Edgerley, Junr. 


Solicitor 


)) 




James. Pughe 


Gentleman 




1820 


Hugh Boulter 


Commercial 









Traveller 







THE PROVINCE OF SHROPSHIRE. 



223 



Name. 

William Griffiths 
Sir Andrew Vincent 
Corbet 
Thomas Hancorn 
William Samuel Hill 
John Carline, Junr. 
John Cartwrii:;ht 
David Evans 
Thomas Lawrence 
Thomas Goldsboro 
George Harper 
*John Jobson 
William Carline 
James Whitney 
James Moore 
Philip Corbett 
Thomas Carline 
George Ernest 

Hamilton 
Americus Hitchcock 
Charles Lloyd 
Richard Hodskinson 
John Wood 
Wilham J. Clement 
John Jones 
Thomas Seed 
Charles Lloyd 
Richard Corbett 
*John Goolden 
Robert Turner 
Charles Bowen Teece 
Nathan Hubbersty 
John Colley 
Edward Steedman 
Edward Oliver 
William Jones 
Thomas Colley 
John Lawrence 

Gardener 
Henry Bloxam 
David Birds 
Francis K. Leighton 
William Heigh way 

Jones 
*+ More 



Profession or 


Residence. 


Tear of 
admis- 


Occupation. 




sion. 


Painter 


Shrewsbury 


1820 


Bart. 


Acton Reynald 


>> 


Ironmonger 


Shrewsbury 


1821 


Distiller 




)) 


Architect 


jj 


1822 


Ironmonger 


)) 




Glazier 


)> 


JJ 


Tailor 


jj 


JJ 


Reverend 


Welshpool 


)J 


Solicitor 


Whitchurch 


1823 


— 


Birmingham 


1824 


Ironmonger 


Shrewsbury 


)) 


Chemist 


)> 


)) 


Solicitor 


J) 


JJ 


Artist 


J) 


1825 


Sculptor 


)) 


JJ 


Surveyor 


jj 


J) 


Silk Mercer 




JJ 
JJ 


Esquire 


jj 


JJ 


Tanner 


)j 


JJ 


Surgeon 


)> 


JJ 


Cooper 


— 


ij 


Merchant 


Liverpool 


JJ 


Esquire 


Adderley, Salop 


JJ 
JJ 


— 


— 


1827 


Solicitor 


Shrewsbury 


)J 


School Master 


)j 


JJ 


Gentleman 


Astley 


JJ 


Gentleman Farmer 


High Ercall 


JJ 


Innkeeper 


Shrewsbury 


JJ 


Shoemaker 


» 


JJ 


Tailor 


?j 


JJ 


Gentleman 


)j 


1828 


Attorney 


Ellesmere 


JJ 


Reverend 


Penley 


JJ 


Reverend 


Cardiston 


1829 


Esquire 


Pontesbury 


1831 


Esquire 


Larden 


1837 



224 



FREEMASONRY IN 



Name. 

Robert Phillips 
Samuel Scoltock 
George Brittain 

Peplow 
William Pickin 
* William Wood 
Henry Keate 
Henry T. Wace 
Grenville Jones 
George Matthews 
Samuel Wood 
*Robert Skelton 

Mackenzie 
*Lord Dungannon 
John Hinton 
Harry Collins Jeffreys 
Robert Plowden 

Weston 
George Gordon 
Joshua Pugh White 
J. J. Barlow 
J. Nigel Heathcote 
William Brightwell 
Thomas Jones Drury 
Thomas Onions 
James Bratton 
John Hawley ' 

Edwards 
Abraham Woolrich 

*Charles P. Baker 
E. H. Dymock 
Samuel Betton 

Gwynne 
Georffe Tomline 
William Burr 
*John Leche 

Rowland 
"tSamuel Hayward 
■'John Watton 
John Broughall 
John Harris 
George E. Hay 
William Henry 

Cooper 



Profession or 
Occupation. 

Esquire 
Grocer 



Solicitor 

Surgeon 

Solicitor 

Dentist 

Printer 

Surgeon 

L.L.D. 



Surgeon 
Solicitor 
Cabinet Maker 

Surgeon 

Schoolmaster 

M.D. 

Tax Collector 

Surgeon 

Solicitor 
Refreshment 

Contractor 
Solicitor 
Reverend 

Surgeon 

M.P. 

Lead Merchant 

Solicitor 

Innkeeper 

Publisher 

Solicitor 

Merchant 

Gentleman 

Solicitor 



Residence. 



Shrewsbury 



Wellington 

Liverpool 

Shrewsbury 



Tear of 
admis- 
sion. 

1837 



1838 



1840 



Wenlock 

Wellington 
Shrewsbury 
J) 

Shrewsbury 



1841 
1843 

1844 



Wem 
Oswestry 

Wem 
Shrewsbury 



1845 



1849 



1850 



THE PROVINCE OP SHROPSHIRE. 



225 



Name. 


Profession or 


Residence. 


Tear o£ 
admis- 




Occupation. 




sion. 


Edward Mostyn 








Owen 


Esquire 


Yeaton 


1851 


Joseph Henry Lee 


Esquire 


Redbrook, Flint 


)' 


Charles Sparlinj; 


Captain 


Petton 


J) 


William John Beach 


— 


Admaston 


J) 


J William Henry 








NicoUs 


Esquire 


Newnham 


J» 


J William Patchett 


Station Master 


Shrewsbury 


)) 


JJohn W. Towers 


Post Master 


J) 


-"? 


JBenjamin Churchill 


H.M. Civil Service 


Oswestry 


J? 


JCharles Thomas 








Woosnam 


Solicitor 


Newtown 


)J 


JRobert Moorson 








Scarth 


j> 


Shrewsbury 


)> 


JCharles Heathcote 




Warrington 


)> 


JHenry Dubbs 


Ironfounder 


jj 


3) 


JRobert Haycock 


Builder 


Shrewsbury 


t) 


1 George S. Barnett 


Jeweller 


)> 


J» 


JLewis Meredith 


Grocer 


)) 


13 


Isaac Taylor 


Coach Proprietor 


j> 


33 


*Peter George 








Bentley 


Reverend 


Ellesmere 


J> 


tHenry Shaw 


Fishing Tackle 

Maker 


Shrewsbury 


JJ 


*Sir Watkin W. 








Wynn 


Baronet 


Wynnstay 


1852 


*J. Hinton Bluck 


Reverend 


Shrawardine 


3) 


*G. C. Guise 


Reverend 


Pulverbatch 


33 


*Charles Wigan 


— 


Ruabon 


53 


*+Augustus Dillon 


— 


— 


J) 


*Gabriel Rollings 


Adjutant 


Shrewsbury 


53 


Sir Henry George 








Harnage 


Bart. 


Belswardine 


)3 


Robert D. Newill 


Solicitor 


Wellington 


53 


William Anslow 


Farmer 


Eyton 


33 


Thomas C. Eyton 


Esquire 


The Vineyard 


33 


+ William Smith 


Esquire 


Chirk 


53 


Christopher R 








Soulsby 


Esquire 


Wrexham 


33 


George Knox 


— 


— 


3) 


Isaac Knowles 


Solicitor 


Wellington 


53 


Edward Jeffreys 


Civil Engineer 


Shrewsbury 


5) 


D. Glynne Mytton 


Reverend 


Oswestry 


53 


William M. Rowlanc 


Miller 


Mytton Mill 


1853 


William Paddock 


— 


Ellesmere 


33 

cc 



226 


FREEMA SONET IN 






Name. 


Profession or 


Residence. 


Year of 
admis- 




Occupation. 




sion. 


Charles James Lloyd 


— 


Machynlleth 


1853 


Edward Oswell 


Esquire 


Oswestry 


iJ 


Walter Reginald 








Corbet 


Lieutenant 


Acton Reynald 


>) 


David Lloyd 


— 


Oswestry 


J) 


tSamuel D. Hoole 


Miller 


Chirk 


J) 


tP. Buckley Williams 


Major 


Pennant 


J) 


James Herbert Preme 


79th Highlanders' 


— 


)j 


William Harley 








Bayley 


Banker 


Shrewsbury 


JJ 


t*Edward Lloyd 








Hunt 


— 


jy 


)j 


+*J. Andrews 


. — 


Oswestry 


)J 


* Joseph W. Smith 


Wharfinger 


Wellington 


)> 


*John Hamer 


Esquire- 


Glanrafon 


)» 


* William Elliot 


Reverend 


Shrewsbury 


1854 


*Robert Hornby 


Reverend 


Lythwood Hall 


)) 


Henry Alfred Jones 


Auctioneer 


Shrewsbury 


JJ 


Charles Chandler 


Solicitor 


)j 


J) 


Henry Davies 


Solicitor 


Oswestry 


JJ 


Francis Peter Roberts 


Bank Manager 


)) 


JJ 


Gr. J. Saunders 


Chemist 


J) 


J) 


*Rowland Hunt 


Esquire 


Boreatton 


1855 


*John Lawrence 








Randal 


Architect 


Shrewsbury 


JJ 


* William 








Majoribanks 


Wine Merchant 


Leamington 


>J 


*Henry Greenwood 


Schoolmaster 


Shrewsbury 


JJ 


Thomas Savin 


Draper 


Oswestry 


JJ 


James Lyndon Pedley 


Architect 


Birmingham 


JJ 


John Dovaston 


Esquire 


West Felton 


1856 


Robert Phibbs Dod 


Captain, Shropshire 
Militia 


Oswestry 


« " 


*Robert Nicolls 


Wine Merchant 


Shrewsbury 


1857 


*tWilliam Ackerman 


Esquire 


Hereford 


ij 


Riou George Benson 


Reverend 


Lutwyche Hall 


JJ 


William Jellicorse 


Reverend 


Clunbury 


JJ 


Richard S. Prance 


Railway Contractor 


Sibberscote 


JJ 


Walter Blythe 


Surgeon 


Dulwich 


JJ 


Richard Scott Deane 


Esquire 


jj 




William Thomas 


Surgeon 


Shrewsbury 


)J 


»W. E. Curtis 


Esquire 


Caynham Court, 
Ludlow 


JJ 


*Ralph A. Benson 


Esquire 


Lutwyche Hall 


JJ 


"B.H.BulkeleyOwen 


Reverend 


Tedsmere Hall 





THE 


PROVINCE OF SHROPSHIRE. 


227 


Name. 


Occupation or 
Profession. 


Residence. 


Year of 

admis- 

Bion. 


*Charles G. Wingfield 


Colonel 


Onslow 


1858 


J. Caple Cholmon- 








deley 


Major 


Condover 


)J 


Charles Oakley- 


Surgeon 


Shrewsbury 


)> 


Sir Thomas Meyrick 


Bart. 


Bush, Pembroke 




Henry Sheridan 








■Rlliott 


. — 


— 




George Owen 


Engineer 


Oswestry 


1859 


Gustaf Tornourd 


— , 


Finland 




Edward Tipton, Junr. 


Manager, Fire Office 


Shrewsbury 


)) 


■\\illiam John Hope 








Edwardes 


Esquire 


Netley Hall 


n 


R. Jasper More 


Esquire 


Linley 


)) 


+Offley Wakeman 


Esquire 


Oxford 


n 


Richard Banner 








Oakley 


Esquire 


Shrewsbury 


n 


Sir Baldwin Leighton 


Bart. 


Loton Park 


)) 


*Robert Hanson 








Coldwell 


Major 


Shrewsbury 


I860 


*Robert Forrest 


Professor of Music 


)) 


)> 


*Thomas Kynnersley 








Gardner 


Captain 


Leighton House 


>) 


Joseph Tomlinson 




-- 




Barlow 


Commercial 

Traveller 


Shrewsbury 


)) 


+Thomas Owen 


Major 


Condover 


(?) 


Spencer Cosby Price 


Captain 


— 


5J 


William Lees Berry 


— 


— 


1861 


*Edward Burd 


M.D. 


Shrewsbury 


5) 


P M. Crampton 


Captain — Chief 

Constable 


ii 


)J 


Walter Thursby 








Pelham 


Captain 


Cound 


)) 


Francis Thursby 








Pelham 


Esquire 


)) 


)> 


George F. B. Willing 


M.D. 


Cressage 


J) 


William Blakeway 


Miller 


Hanwood 


1862 


George Juckes 


Solicitor 


Shrewsbury 


)J 


H. V. Jones 


Esquire 


Ruchley 


J> 


Walter Moseley 


Esquire 


Buildwas 


)) 


Robert Sloman 


Esquire 


Welshpool 


1863 


WilUam Eddowes 


Surgeon 


Shrewsbury 


)) 


William Ash 


Reverend 


West Felton 


)) 


*William Clarke 


Civil Engineer 


Shrewsbury 


)) 


*Philip Whitcombe 


Reverend 


11 


)) 



228 


FREEMASONKY IN 




Name. 


Profession or 


Residence. 


Year of 
admis- 




Occupation. 




sion. 


*Walter Whitmore 


Captain 


Apley Park 


1863 


*"Williain Minton 








Beddoes 


Physician 


Ludlow 


1864 


*Richard Chambers 








Roberts 


Reverend 


Ruabon 


JJ 


*W. J. Lane 


Esquire 


Bishop's Castle 


J) 


Charles G. Wade 


Merchant 


London 


J) 


George W. Fisher 


Reverend 


The Schools, 

Shrewsbury 


J) 


Thomas Jobson 


Corn Merchant 


Shrewsbury 




W. J. Ward 


Reverend 


)) 


J) 


G. T. Archer 


Esquire 


London 




Francis Needham 


Bank Manager 


Shrewsbury 




Cecil Peele 


Solicitor 


JJ 




Robert Charles 








Webster 


Civil Engineer 


Oswestry 


5» 


Andrew Good 








Brookes 


Physician 


Shrewsbury 


1865 


Richard Palin 


Solicitor 


JJ 




Scarlet Lloyd Parry 


a 


JJ 


)) 


W. Bryan Bryan 


Reverend 


)j 


J) 


John Davies Harries 


Surgeon 


>j 


J] 


Charles L. Heathcote 


jj 


JJ 




*Edwyn Andrew 


Physician 


JJ 


1866 


*John Barber 


Auctioneer 


Wellington 




*John H. Slaney 


Wine Merchant 


J) 


J) 


*Lord E. Hill Trevor 


— 


Oswestry 


J) 


Thomas Fenn 


— 


Downton 




*J. Ralph Ormsby 


Esquire(afterwards 






Gore 


Lord Harlech) 


Oswestry 


1867 


Thomas Griffiths 


Solicitor 


Bishop's Castle 


JJ 


John Maguire 


Tyler 


Shrewsbury 




George Terry West 


Esquire 


Bishop's Castle 


,, 


*F.B.WyndhamQuin 


Esquire 


Market Drayton 


1868 


*Anthony Gardner 


Esquire 


Leighton 


JJ 


*Charles H. Corbett 










Edmund Cresswell 








Peele 


Solicitor 


Shrewsbury 


)) 


*t — Greenwood 


Reverend 


JJ 


1869 


(Hon. Mem.) 








John Edward Stainer 


Esquire 


Uppington 


J) 


*G. C. Nottley 


Reverend 


Ratlinghope 


1870 


*Edward M. 








Wakeman 


Esquire 


Coton Hall, 

Bridgnorth 


J) 



THE 


PROVINCE OP SHROPSHIRE. 


229 


Name. 


Profession or 


Residence. 


Tear o£ 
admiB- 




Occupation. 




sion. 


*Henry Newman 


Inland Revenue 

Officer 


Shrewsbury 


1870 


*C. J. S. Churchill 


Rev., The Schools 


jj 


jj 


John Thomas Jones 


Surgeon 


Llanfyllin 


)) 


Richard M. Hickman 


)> 


Newport 


)J 


Thomas Hickman 


Land Agent 


Leaton 


JJ. 


John Taylor 


Miller 


Wellington 


)> 


Richard W. Owen 








Withers 


Surgeon 


Shrewsbury 


)> 


John Bucknall Cooper 


Solicitor 


J) 


)J 


Joseph H. Redman 


Barrister-at-Law 


J) 


J) 


John Ernest Frail 


Esquire 


)) 


)J 


*Montague Hulton 








Harrop 


Esquire 


Lythwood 


1871 


Arthur George Brooke 


Clerk 


Astley 


)) 


J. Harley Bayley 








Crawford 


Esquire 


Shrewsbury 


)) 


*Sir Oflley Wakeman 


Bart. 


Cound Hall 


1872 


*John Bodenham 


Banker 


Newport 


)J 


William Thomas 


Serving Brother 


J) 


3) 


Herbert L. Snow 


M.D. 


Shrewsbury 


J) 


Thomas Charles 








Marsh 


Surgeon 


jj 


>) 


William Scarlett Price 


Solicitor 


TJ 


)) 


Charles C. T. Fagan 


Reverend 


>) 


3J 


*Henry Charles 








Clarke 


Solicitor 


)J 


1873 


*Charles H. 








Drinkwater 


Reverend 


)) 


3J 


*John James Saville 


Surgeon 


)J 


>) 


♦Arthur John Peele 


Civil Engineer 


J) 


>3 


*Henry Offley 








Wakeman 


Esquire 


Oxford 


J) 


''Alfred Salwey 


Esquire 


Ludlow 


)) 


*Charles B. H. Soame 


Surgeon, — Baronet 


Dawley 


)> 


* Henry Woolner 


Artist 


Coalbrookdale 


)J 


* John Bishop Boucher 


Professor of Music 


Shrewsbury 


3> 


Algernon G-. B. 








Whitmore 


Esquire 


Stockton, Salop 


J) 


Samuel Pountney 








Smith 


Architect 


Shrewsbury 


1874 


Benjamin Newnes 


Tyler 


n 


3) 


James Ouston Smith 


Surgeon 


)) 


1876 


Arthur Lowcock 


Engineer 


» 


)> 


*W. E. Stuart 


Major 


Betton Strange 


)> 



230 


FREEMASONRY IN 






Name. 


Profession or 


Residence. 


Tear of 
admis- 




Occupation. 




sion. 


*Jolm Sides Davies 


Surgeon 


Oswestry 


1876 


*Johri Barr 


Bank Manager 


Shrewsbury 


J) 


Sydney Freme 








Clemenl 


Surgeon 




1877 


* Arthur Henry 








Downes 


J) 


jj 


J) 


* John Briscoe Bagnal] 


Gentleman 


)j 


;; 


Joseph Parry Jones 


Solicitor 


Oswestry 


1878 


John T. Wills 


— 


Shrewsbury 


)J 


Charles Shea Thomas 


Solicitor 


)j 




William Edward 








Harding 


Surgeon Dentist 


J) 




William Lewis Meyer 


Surgeon 


Oakengates 


)J 


* Edward Acherley 








Phillips 


Banker 


Shrewsbury 


J) 


*R. E. Warren 


Reverend 


)) 




Robert A. Craig 


Solicitor 


** J) 


1879 


Herbert Coupland 








Tayloi 


lM.B. 


)> 


J) 


Henry F. Elliott 


burgeon 


Ruyton-IX- 

Towns 


>J 


John Avery 


Wine Merchant 


Shrewsbury 


J) 


■^John Minor Kilvert 


Esquire 


Grinshill 




Herbert G. Wakefield 


Chaplain H.M S. 

Prison 
Surgeon 


Shrewsbury 


1880 


*W. Herbert Packer 


Cressage 




John Wynne 








Jeudwine 


Barrister-at-Law 


Shrewsbury 


1881 


William Aylmer 








Lewis 


Surgeon 


Oswestry 


J) 


Paul Maurice 








Berkeley 


H.M. Civil Service 


Shrewsbury 


)} 


Thomas Slaney Eyton 


Banker 


jj 




*Thomas Sullock 






" 


Stooke 


Civil Engineer 


}) 




*Arthur E. Lloyd 








Oswell 


Architect 






Adolphus Dovaston 


>j 


)) 


1882 


Wyndham Deedes 


Private School 

Master 


3) 


1883 


James E. Parson 








Smith 


Merchant 




1884 


John Downes 








Southam 


Wine Merchant 




1885 


John Gray 


Surgeon 


>1 


)i 



THE PROVINCE OF SHROPSHIRE. 



231 



Name. 


Profession or 
Occupation. 


Residence. 


Tear of 
admis- 
sion. 


*"W. Tiascelles 








Southwell 


Esquire 


Bridgnorth 


1885 


Henry Ponting Cox 


Solicitor 


Wem 




G, Middleton 








Ashdown 


Reverend 


Ruabon 


1886 


Henry Mansell James 


H.M. Civil Service Shrewsbury 


)) 


Samuel Clement 








Southam 


Wine Merchant 


)j 


J) 


James Allan Bratton 


Surgeon 


)? 


JJ 


John Frail Harries 


Surgeon 


J) 


1887 


Arthur T. M. Wood 


Esquire 


Wem 


jj 


Alexander Graham 


Barrister-at-Law 


Shrewsbury 


)) 


Ernest Tredinnick 


Surgeon 


Craven Arms 


1888 


William C. Clement 








Peele 


Solicitor 


Shrewsbury 


1889 


Francis Salisbury 


H.M. Civil Service 


)> 


J) 


William Hugh Sprott 


Coffee Planter 


Mercara, India 


;> 


^Frederick Knollys 








Pigott 


Surgeon 


Shrewsbury 




Cecil Anthony P. 








Osburne 


Surgeon 


Church Stretton 


1890 


*Percy Emson 


Reverend 


Shrewsbury 


1891 


*G. C. P. Williams 


Captain-Chief 






Freeman 


Constable 


jj 


)J 


George Gainwell 


Serving Brother 


?> 


JJ 


Alfred T. Davis 


Civil Engineer 


jj 


)J 


C. W. Campbell 








Hyslop 


Surgeon 


Church Stretton 


)J 



The List of Members originally compiled from the Minute-books was 
carefully compared with the Register of Grand Lodge. In many cases 
differences and discrepancies were discovered ; these, however, were in the 
majority of instances clearly due to inaccuracies in the Register. 

The Minute-books are in places so badly kept, and the Register in 
Grand Lodge was often so irregular, that even from both sources combined, 
a perfectly accurate list cannot be obtained. It is hoped, however, that the 
list given above is substantially correct. 

Names marked * are those of joining members. 

Names marked t are those of members who were never registered in 
Grand Lodge. 

Names marked X a'e those of members who joined without election 
at the amalgamation of the two Shrewsbury Lodges in 1851. 



232 FREEMASONRY IN THE PROVINCE OF SHROPSHIRE. 



In former days liiembers seem to have constantly resigned the Lodge 
ami afterwards rejoined it. No notice is taken in the above list of such 
transactions, even when on such rejoining a fresh registration in Grand 
Lodge was made. It is thought that one entry of a member's name will 
supply all that would be either interesting or useful. 

No attempt has been made to any change of residence. The addresses 
given are those at the time of admission. 




ADNITT AND NAUNTON, PRINTERS, THE SQUARE, SHREWSBURY.